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The SRK Science Thread 2.0

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  • forte95forte95 Buster Cannoneer Joined: Posts: 546
    edited June 2017
    Have any of the physicists here studied RiemannianGeometry? (Riemannian manifolds containing tangent spaces imbued with inner products)

    Im doing research within this topic leading to complex geometry and I figured anyone who likes physics on the theoretical side would take a look at Riemannian Geometry for relativity.

    I only very, very lightly studied it. Learning it would be incredibly useful because a big part of relativity is calculating geodesics in various manifolds, so knowing about Riemannian and hyperbolic geometry beforehand wouldn't hurt. What research are you taking this for?
    I've been meaning to write a segmented, abstract treatise about this for a while but due to time constraints and general slothfulness I was hindered a bit. In any case, my desire is to start an in-depth discussion about life in all its facets, with the first discussion on its foundation.


    My question is, do you think the current definition of life is outdated or at the very least, very strict?

    I'd really like to take part in this discussion, because the physics of consciousness is something that interests me. Admittedly I've had next to no time at all for posting here in the science thread for the past few months, but I'll prepare a reply this weekend.
    Post edited by forte95 on
    I'm a physics enthusiast. Let's talk science.
  • ThePurpleBunnyThePurpleBunny Joined: Posts: 17,809 ✭✭✭✭✭ OG
    https://www.yahoo.com/news/chinese-just-teleported-object-earth-225500655.html
    Since then, the process has become a standard operation in quantum optics labs around the world. In fact, just last year, two separate teams conducted the world's first quantum teleportation outside of a laboratory.

    Now, researchers in China have taken the process a few steps further: they successfully teleported a photon from Earth to a satellite orbiting more than 500 km (311 mi) away.
    Twitchy | Twatter
    Fightcade: FaceToFist
  • DarksakulDarksakul I find your lack of Faith Disturbing. Joined: Posts: 25,106
    Older video but still a good topic

    “Strong people don't put others down... They lift them up.”
    - Darth Vader, Philanthropist
  • The Furious OneThe Furious One Fluent in 3 languages Engrish, Sarcasm & Profanity Joined: Posts: 20,939
    edited August 2017
    Nanomachines which can drill into cancer cells, killing them in just 60 seconds, have been developed by scientists.

    The tiny spinning molecules are driven by light, and spin so quickly that they can burrow their way through cell linings when activated.
    In one test conducted at Durham University the nanomachines took between one and three minutes to break through the outer membrane of prostate cancer cell, killing it instantly.

    Dr Robert Pal of Durham University said: "We are moving towards realising our ambition to be able to use light-activated nanomachines to target cancer cells such as those in breast tumours and skin melanomas, including those that are resistant to existing chemotherapy.

    “Once developed, this approach could provide a potential step change in non-invasive cancer treatment and greatly improve survival rates and patient welfare globally."

    The researchers are already proceeding with experiments in microorganisms and small fish and hope to move to rodents soon, ahead of clinical trials in humans if animal testing is successful.
    http://news.rice.edu/2017/08/30/motorized-molecules-drill-through-cells-2/
  • StockyJamStockyJam Wholier than Thou Joined: Posts: 6,233


    2:20 mark of the video
    its interesting that the plane, since it flies at 3x the speed of sound, and since the air friction causes immense heat for the entire plane, that its fuel cells are sorta loose when on the ground. but they close up in the air when the heat causes the metal to expand.

    point is, is that when its in the air, the heat expansion seals up the fuel containers, since its made/designed more fore its effectiveness in the air, in its natural environment of heat.
    but on the ground, the fuel tanks are like open gills. like something with open ridges.
    so it bleeds fuel on the ground.

    like a wooden barrel that has its wood planks not sealed fully. interesting.
  • StockyJamStockyJam Wholier than Thou Joined: Posts: 6,233
    edited September 2017
    the plane,...is actually very handicap.

    they say you cant shoot down a Blackbird cause its flies too fast at too high an altitude.
    but i know how to bring it down,

    just shoot down the plane that fuels it mid air. cause the Blackbird cant get very far without it.

    first-pitch-fail-baseball-fail-gifs.gif

    about that far.
  • DarksakulDarksakul I find your lack of Faith Disturbing. Joined: Posts: 25,106
    edited September 2017
    StockyJam wrote: »
    the plane,...is actually very handicap.

    they say you cant shoot down a Blackbird cause its flies too fast at too high an altitude.
    but i know how to bring it down,

    just shoot down the plane that fuels it mid air. cause the Blackbird cant get very far without it.

    http://www.totalproDERP.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/stocky-Jam-fail-meme-fail-gifs.gif

    about that far.

    Actually the Black Bird has incredible range, its just short if you are trying to take off in California and wanted to spy on Moscow
    “Strong people don't put others down... They lift them up.”
    - Darth Vader, Philanthropist
  • StockyJamStockyJam Wholier than Thou Joined: Posts: 6,233
    edited September 2017
    did you watch the video. it shows and says it has to immediately refuel after takeoff due to its fuel cells leaking while grounded for the reasons i mentioned.
  • DarksakulDarksakul I find your lack of Faith Disturbing. Joined: Posts: 25,106
    StockyJam wrote: »
    did you watch the video. it shows and says it has to immediately refuel after takeoff due to its fuel cells leaking while grounded for the reasons i mentioned.

    I take anything you posted with a grain of salt.
    “Strong people don't put others down... They lift them up.”
    - Darth Vader, Philanthropist
  • MarcOfTheBeastMarcOfTheBeast Joined: Posts: 340
    Does anyone in this thread have a M.S in biotechnology. I was thinking about pursuing a degree in this field. I just wanted to know the challenges in school, ups and downs, and other advice someone could give me.
  • Jion_WansuJion_Wansu Joined: Posts: 6,524
    Those Asian giant hornets are huge!!! No thanks




  • DarkGeneralDarkGeneral Joined: Posts: 4,560
    Does anyone in this thread have a M.S in biotechnology. I was thinking about pursuing a degree in this field. I just wanted to know the challenges in school, ups and downs, and other advice someone could give me.

    I'd like to hear about this as well as I'll be pursuing a PhD soon and would like to go into the Biotech industry afterwards. Also I was wondering how many of you fine gentleman have publications and how did you find interesting research projects to become a part of.
  • Icy Black DeepIcy Black Deep Still training... Joined: Posts: 1,480
    Does anyone in this thread have a M.S in biotechnology. I was thinking about pursuing a degree in this field. I just wanted to know the challenges in school, ups and downs, and other advice someone could give me.
    I can't speak to that, but you might try asking in the Engineering thread. Even though it's not strictly an engineering question, that thread tends to be more oriented toward such a question.
    New Jersey
  • DarksakulDarksakul I find your lack of Faith Disturbing. Joined: Posts: 25,106
    Does anyone in this thread have a M.S in biotechnology. I was thinking about pursuing a degree in this field. I just wanted to know the challenges in school, ups and downs, and other advice someone could give me.

    Friend of mine who has a M.S. in Biology. I think his speciality is in Genetics. He's working on his PhD.
    He found very quickly you need to become oriented in multiple disciplines.
    Like for example to get his work done and one of his machines in the Lab breaks down he can ether wait for a $44,000 logic board or do the repair himself with a soldering iron and a $1.05 in Capacitors.
    Guess which repair got authorized and paid by the University, they rather just dip into petty cash for the $1.05 than to write a check for 44K
    “Strong people don't put others down... They lift them up.”
    - Darth Vader, Philanthropist
  • MarcOfTheBeastMarcOfTheBeast Joined: Posts: 340
    edited October 2017
    Does anyone in this thread have a M.S in biotechnology. I was thinking about pursuing a degree in this field. I just wanted to know the challenges in school, ups and downs, and other advice someone could give me.

    I'd like to hear about this as well as I'll be pursuing a PhD soon and would like to go into the Biotech industry afterwards. Also I was wondering how many of you fine gentleman have publications and how did you find interesting research projects to become a part of.

    Don't quote me, but I think you'll have ample opportunities to publish and be a part of interesting research projects 1-2 years within your PhD (this all depends on the program, your PI, and the type of lab you will be working out of). You might be able to publish or coauthor on some papers when you do substanial lab work. My friend finished her PhD in Biology last year; she specializes in neuroscience. Some of the MS students coauthor some papers in her lab. I don't want to criticize anyone's work because I know nothing about neuroscience but it would be like 8-10 people on a 5 page paper. I'm like damn man, are you serious? That's understandable for doctors (who are well established) but for some who doesn't even have a PhD that's pushing it. Anyways, what subject areas are you interested in the Biotech? For me, it's finance.

    @Icy Black Deep I'll look there. Thanks!
  • NaerasNaeras Terribad Joined: Posts: 3,619
    edited October 2017
    Does anyone in this thread have a M.S in biotechnology. I was thinking about pursuing a degree in this field. I just wanted to know the challenges in school, ups and downs, and other advice someone could give me.

    I finished my M. Sc. in molecular biology in 2015, specializing on signaling pathways in cancer. What I can say about it is that there are good opportunities for an academic career (if your project involves the word "cancer" people will throw money at you), so if that's what you're interested in, go for it. The field is also expanding extremely rapidly, to the point where it told Moore's law to go fuck itself, and there will always be new stuff to keep working on. The international community is also really connected on this, and there are a lot of opportunities to work abroad, so if you want to travel somewhere, that's definitely a perk.

    Keep in mind, however, that you're kind of locking yourself into a full Ph. D. The job opportunities don't really open up before you have one, unless you're very well connected. And even after the Ph.D. you'll likely still be doing postdocs for several years afterwards, unless, again, you have connections. So make sure to network aggressively while you're studying. That's even if you want to go Ph. D. / postdoc, of course, because that opens a lot of doors.

    Also be aware of the fact that the labwork is really hit-or-miss. I know some people who truly love the day-to-day labwork, and love the preparation, precision and documentation that goes into this. If that's your thing, this is somewhere you can probably do really well. I personally realized that I didn't enjoy it. Partially because I got carpal tunnel in my thumb from pipetting too much. Partially because it takes so long to see progress, and even when things work I have to repeat everything ad nauseam, so I personally feel it's rather unrewarding. But worst of all is losing several months of worktime to a tiny detail which it's incredibly hard to trace back to its source, which has happened several times (I once had to throw away 4 months of data because it turned out a lamp in my instrument was faulty). This happens to everyone, so be prepared for it. And it sucks just as bad as it sounds like.

    Cautions aside, I still love the field. And being able to say that I've genetically manipulated cancer cells (and, more recently, tried to make yeast cells shoot lasers) is really fun. But you need to actually like the work on the experiments you're doing, instead of just being interested in the science. I didn't, so I jumped off to do programming and project management instead rather than continuing with a Ph. D. (in retrospect I should probably just have done bioinformatics, lol)
  • DarkGeneralDarkGeneral Joined: Posts: 4,560
    @Naeras

    Thanks man, I appreciate the hell out of your post!

    I guess I should clarify a little bit about myself but I currently have 2 publications that made it into journals and I'm currently working on a third at the undergraduate level. My current research project is cancer cell biology centric where the aim is exploring signal transduction pathways. I'm hoping that what I'm working on now will eventually get published because I think it's incredibly cool and potentially illuminating. I originally pursued biology to become a cancer researcher and luckily for me I've fell in love with research and I adore the work that I do.

    Labwork is frustrating as fuck sometimes but I enjoy the process of troubleshooting. Luckily I have yet to have had any major setbacks with months worth of work being lost (a few weeks sure), but I know it's inevitably going to occur. I also think that I've gotten extremely lucky to have had great PI's who gave a little undergrad like myself a perfect mix of oversight and autonomy. I'm not a genius or anything, I've just been very fortunate to show what little talent I have while working very hard and being acknowledged.

    I guess the intent of my original question was rooted in how to navigate the different labs in which you hold interest, how you landed a spot in a lab/on a project at the graduate and undergrad levels.
  • NaerasNaeras Terribad Joined: Posts: 3,619
    I'd imagine the method of finding projects varies greatly between universities, and even countries. At the University of Oslo, potential supervisors flag out projects for master-students to work on, and then the students compete for those based on their B. Sc.-grades. I know the other big Norwegian universities work differently, and I'd imagine it's different in other countries as well.
  • DarksakulDarksakul I find your lack of Faith Disturbing. Joined: Posts: 25,106
    At 94, Lithium-Ion Pioneer Eyes A New Longer-Lasting Battery

    But many scientists are are skeptical.

    http://www.npr.org/sections/alltechconsidered/2017/05/22/529116034/at-94-lithium-ion-pioneer-eyes-a-new-longer-lasting-battery

    “Strong people don't put others down... They lift them up.”
    - Darth Vader, Philanthropist
  • BullDancerBullDancer Mentos, The Freshmaker Joined: Posts: 9,571
    Well if it works then we are still stuck using lithium still.... welp. I'd read more on it, but electricity isn't really my thing.
    "Rock abandoned Neesa there like you were gonna abandon your son and wife and live alone with your TV"~Akuma-HAX
  • DarksakulDarksakul I find your lack of Faith Disturbing. Joined: Posts: 25,106
    BullDancer wrote: »
    Well if it works then we are still stuck using lithium still.... welp. I'd read more on it, but electricity isn't really my thing.

    Well John Goodenough help invented Lithium Ion batteries back in 79, when did we start to see them in use? First commercial Lithium battery was not till 1991.
    And it was only after 2004 when we started actual widespread use.

    “Strong people don't put others down... They lift them up.”
    - Darth Vader, Philanthropist
  • MCPMCP Joined: Posts: 2,259 ✭✭✭✭✭ OG
    edited October 2017
    When I started my M.S. (not biology, robotics and I did air traffic research), I had helped as an undergraduate researcher on a paper, but was not added to the author list. I helped do the software for a great learning opportunity.

    I intended to stay on as a PhD and was convinced to go out and get a job immediately after a M.S. I first published after I finished my M.S. while starting my post university job.

    At that job, I did much research and was co-author, or sub author, on about a dozen papers over 5 years. I mostly did software and then scientific analysis in air traffic research. That was a lot of fun, but underpaid.

    My new job is almost entirely software engineering and I'm on only one paper about to be published. Most of the time I simply support the platform so that scientists and partners can publish their results. That's fine with me. I'm not an academic.

    The high end of publications are like ten papers a year. Those people are the rare ones who can work 90+ hours a week and handle several different subjects at once with more than a few different partners.

    They're pretty weird and interesting. Most people want to have lives outside of work and so, having a few papers a year is fine. Most of my professors are around 3~4 publications a year, if they're full time professors (some have companies now)
  • StockyJamStockyJam Wholier than Thou Joined: Posts: 6,233
  • Jion_WansuJion_Wansu Joined: Posts: 6,524
    MCP wrote: »
    When I started my M.S. (not biology, robotics and I did air traffic research), I had helped as an undergraduate researcher on a paper, but was not added to the author list. I helped do the software for a great learning opportunity.

    I intended to stay on as a PhD and was convinced to go out and get a job immediately after a M.S. I first published after I finished my M.S. while starting my post university job.

    At that job, I did much research and was co-author, or sub author, on about a dozen papers over 5 years. I mostly did software and then scientific analysis in air traffic research. That was a lot of fun, but underpaid.

    My new job is almost entirely software engineering and I'm on only one paper about to be published. Most of the time I simply support the platform so that scientists and partners can publish their results. That's fine with me. I'm not an academic.

    The high end of publications are like ten papers a year. Those people are the rare ones who can work 90+ hours a week and handle several different subjects at once with more than a few different partners.

    They're pretty weird and interesting. Most people want to have lives outside of work and so, having a few papers a year is fine. Most of my professors are around 3~4 publications a year, if they're full time professors (some have companies now)

    Funny thing. Seems like the higher ones degree, the more underpaid you are. Then you have those people that barely went to school taking home 6 figures and such...
  • NaerasNaeras Terribad Joined: Posts: 3,619
    Jion_Wansu wrote: »
    MCP wrote: »
    When I started my M.S. (not biology, robotics and I did air traffic research), I had helped as an undergraduate researcher on a paper, but was not added to the author list. I helped do the software for a great learning opportunity.

    I intended to stay on as a PhD and was convinced to go out and get a job immediately after a M.S. I first published after I finished my M.S. while starting my post university job.

    At that job, I did much research and was co-author, or sub author, on about a dozen papers over 5 years. I mostly did software and then scientific analysis in air traffic research. That was a lot of fun, but underpaid.

    My new job is almost entirely software engineering and I'm on only one paper about to be published. Most of the time I simply support the platform so that scientists and partners can publish their results. That's fine with me. I'm not an academic.

    The high end of publications are like ten papers a year. Those people are the rare ones who can work 90+ hours a week and handle several different subjects at once with more than a few different partners.

    They're pretty weird and interesting. Most people want to have lives outside of work and so, having a few papers a year is fine. Most of my professors are around 3~4 publications a year, if they're full time professors (some have companies now)

    Funny thing. Seems like the higher ones degree, the more underpaid you are. Then you have those people that barely went to school taking home 6 figures and such...

    Only if you're in academia.
    I wish that was supposed to be funny. :(

    With that in mind, I'd encourage everyone in this thread to read this. It's one of those things that's hugely problematic because science is really fucking important, but there's fairly little will behind solving this stuff because it only directly affects a very small part of the population (namely, the people working in science), and a lot of these issues take actual time and effort to solve, and may even have to be done at an international level for the differences to be felt.
  • HecatomHecatom Aka Black Gorilla (・Д・)ノ Joined: Posts: 24,345
    ( •_•) IT'S NOT RAPE,
    ( •_•)>⌐■-■
    IT'S SURPRISE SEX! (⌐■_■)
    YEAAAAAAAAAAHHH!!
    "Orgasm is a simile for the emotional epiphany a woman has when the shame of penetration is eclipsed by the inherent virtue of servicing a man." ~ Kromo.
    ( •_•)
    ( ಠ_ಠ)
    ( ಥ_ಥ)
  • MCPMCP Joined: Posts: 2,259 ✭✭✭✭✭ OG
    edited October 2017
    Jion_Wansu wrote: »
    Funny thing. Seems like the higher ones degree, the more underpaid you are. Then you have those people that barely went to school taking home 6 figures and such...

    Well if you want to sell your sell your soul and do advertising for Alphabet, you'll gain some golden handcuffs. I almost got into the Stanford scene. I wouldn't have been able to stop smelling my own farts.

    My ATC research was underpaid for the SF bay area because it's government grant/contracts. Those are necessarily less than average pay in the bay area, unfortunately.

    Research doesn't make the big bucks, until suddenly a start up appears out of it and then you maybe, possibly, with a very small chance, make a decent business making money.
    Naeras wrote: »

    Only if you're in academia.
    I wish that was supposed to be funny. :(

    With that in mind, I'd encourage everyone in this thread to read this. It's one of those things that's hugely problematic because science is really fucking important, but there's fairly little will behind solving this stuff because it only directly affects a very small part of the population (namely, the people working in science), and a lot of these issues take actual time and effort to solve, and may even have to be done at an international level for the differences to be felt.
    Yea, every time my work tended more towards the abstract end of science, the money was reduced.

    When there were clear goals, the money gets bigger. That's the art of grant/contract writing I suppose.

    Prove something has big potential, but in order to prove it has big potential, you need to get money and ... that's where a lot of ideas tend to die.
    Today, scientists' success often isn't measured by the quality of their questions or the rigor of their methods. It's instead measured by how much grant money they win, the number of studies they publish, and how they spin their findings to appeal to the public.
    Sigh. Too true, 100%.
  • DarksakulDarksakul I find your lack of Faith Disturbing. Joined: Posts: 25,106
    According To Science, Heavy Metal Makes You A Better Person
    http://www.waaf.com/blogs/anthony-capobianco/according-science-heavy-metal-makes-you-better-person
    Completely refuting the stigma that "metalheads" abiding by the "sex, drugs and rock n' roll" lifestyle would lead them down a destructive path, a scientific study done by Humbolt State University states that listening to heavy metal music leads to living a happier youth and becoming more well-adjusted during middle-age.

    Also, the sky is blue and water is wet.
    “Strong people don't put others down... They lift them up.”
    - Darth Vader, Philanthropist
  • HecatomHecatom Aka Black Gorilla (・Д・)ノ Joined: Posts: 24,345
    Darksakul wrote: »
    According To Science, Heavy Metal Makes You A Better Person
    http://www.waaf.com/blogs/anthony-capobianco/according-science-heavy-metal-makes-you-better-person
    Completely refuting the stigma that "metalheads" abiding by the "sex, drugs and rock n' roll" lifestyle would lead them down a destructive path, a scientific study done by Humbolt State University states that listening to heavy metal music leads to living a happier youth and becoming more well-adjusted during middle-age.

    Also, the sky is blue and water is wet.

    No shit.
    Many studies done in the past years about the metal subcultures have shown that all the stereotypes about them are quite the opposite from the truth.
    The "menial jobs and not book smart" description is averted in real life: a French sociologist studied the metal crowd, taking for basis the fans who attended the Hellfest Summer Open Air festival of 2011. His conclusion: higher diplomas and less unemployment among metalheads than other youth groups.
    ( •_•) IT'S NOT RAPE,
    ( •_•)>⌐■-■
    IT'S SURPRISE SEX! (⌐■_■)
    YEAAAAAAAAAAHHH!!
    "Orgasm is a simile for the emotional epiphany a woman has when the shame of penetration is eclipsed by the inherent virtue of servicing a man." ~ Kromo.
    ( •_•)
    ( ಠ_ಠ)
    ( ಥ_ಥ)
  • DarksakulDarksakul I find your lack of Faith Disturbing. Joined: Posts: 25,106
    I am all for calling it a exoroid
    “Strong people don't put others down... They lift them up.”
    - Darth Vader, Philanthropist
  • Icy Black DeepIcy Black Deep Still training... Joined: Posts: 1,480
    Naeras wrote: »
    Shameless self-promotion: this is what I've spent my last 8 months doing.
    (please excuse a few cases of screwed-up formatting on the page, the wiki editing tool froze us out during one of our finals edits ._.)

    Travelling to Boston to talk about bio-lasers next week, gonna be fun. ~~

    Interesting stuff. Heavier on the biology side and light (no pun intended) on the optics side. My experience is more in photonics so this disappointed me a little. :)
    New Jersey
  • NaerasNaeras Terribad Joined: Posts: 3,619
    Naeras wrote: »
    Shameless self-promotion: this is what I've spent my last 8 months doing.
    (please excuse a few cases of screwed-up formatting on the page, the wiki editing tool froze us out during one of our finals edits ._.)

    Travelling to Boston to talk about bio-lasers next week, gonna be fun. ~~

    Interesting stuff. Heavier on the biology side and light (no pun intended) on the optics side. My experience is more in photonics so this disappointed me a little. :)

    I suggest reading the Nature Photonics-article we're citing if you want to know more. It's a cool subject, it's just that nobody has really tested the theorized uses of a bio-laser yet.
  • forte95forte95 Buster Cannoneer Joined: Posts: 546
    Nice, what a clever way of potentially learning more about the protein, if I'm understanding correctly.

    Glad to see what people are up to, here.
    I'm a physics enthusiast. Let's talk science.
  • NaerasNaeras Terribad Joined: Posts: 3,619
    forte95 wrote: »
    Nice, what a clever way of potentially learning more about the protein, if I'm understanding correctly.

    Well, kinda. It's mainly to investigate gene expression, so it's useful for checking pathways and promoters. That sort of use was what we were trying to investigate, anyway.
  • forte95forte95 Buster Cannoneer Joined: Posts: 546
    Ah. I'm mostly of the same sentiment; I know little of the biology side, more of the physics side (although I wasn't in photonics). I'll read the linked article.
    I'm a physics enthusiast. Let's talk science.
  • Jion_WansuJion_Wansu Joined: Posts: 6,524
    There's growing evidence that fine particles of moondust might actually float, ejected from the lunar surface by electrostatic repulsion. This could create a temporary nighttime "atmosphere" of dust. The moondust atmosphere might also gather itself into a sort of diaphanous wind. Drawn by differences in global charge accumulation, floating dust would naturally fly from the strongly negative nightside to the weakly negative dayside. This "dust storm" effect would be strongest at the Moon's terminator. Much of these details are still speculative, but the Lunar Prospector spacecraft detected changes in the lunar nightside voltage during magnetotail crossings, jumping from -200 V to -1000 V. Further characterization was done by the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer orbiter in late 2013.[4][5]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic_field_of_the_Moon


    Could be the reason that it appeared that the American flag was flying and waving on the moon.

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