How a 19th century German scientist could help you win at fighting games

LunaSlaveLunaSlave insert title hereJoined: Posts: 150
If you're a fighting game player, chances are you're mostly self-taught, an autodidact of sorts. Sure, if you take the game seriously at all, you probably pick up tools, tricks, combos and gimmicks from your friends, or online, or simply absorb them through experience with the game – but I'm willing to bet that the way in which you implement those tools into your arsenal is largely unstructured and self-implemented.

There might be a few of you who take lessons from the wonderful teachers out there like Air, but chances are you don't - and if you are among those few who take lessons, remember: a teacher can can only do their best to point you in the right direction, but they can't take you there. As Zen Buddhists say, "the finger that points at the moon is not the moon."

Compare the situation in the fighting game scene, even at its top levels, among professional players, with the elite in various competitive sports. As I said, fighting game players, even those who are part of teams, are largely self-taught and self-trained. Compare that to say, Olympic gymnastics or the UFC, where an athlete will have an extensive set of coaches and trainers dedicated to maximizing their potential in various areas. It's a safe bet that governments and sponsors aren't going to pour the amount of money into competitive Street Fighter that they are willing to contribute to Olympic gymnastics, and it's also unlikely that high-level King of Fighters play is ever going to compete with the UFC for the lucrative pay-per-view market, which makes copying this state of affairs essentially impossible.

That leaves those of us who take fighting games seriously with the daunting task of doing what we can to improve as efficiently as possible with the time that we have, whcih requires smart scheduling as we juggle gameplaying time with the routine of our lives. Of course, the old wisdom about spending a significant part of that time playing against good players is absolutely true, and that should of course be our primary focus. That being said, training specific skills is important too – and even if you're hardcore, and you spend time every day in training mode practicing important techniques like bread-and-butter combos, safe jumps, hit confirms and such, you've probably given significantly more thought to what you're practicing than when you practice it.

Why is that? That question of WHEN is ultimately a question of maximizing one's efficiency. Skills in fighting games are like any other kind of knowledge – they take time to acquire and take practice to implement in a practical fashion – a learning curve.

Perhaps just as importantly, they take time to maintain, too, or else you'll lose them – a forgetting curve.

I'm guessing that most of you have heard of learning curves. Take a quick look around here on SRK and other fighting game forums, and you'll find lots of statements like "Character X has a really steep learning curve" or "I bought game Y but it took me a while to figure out how to play, the learning curve was really high"

But how many of you have paid any attention to forgetting curves? The forgetting curve is something discovered by a German psychologist named Hermann Ebbinghaus back in the 1880s – basically, it just means that there's a predictable rate at which we forget information. Ebbinghaus was also the first to describe learning curves – a widely used concept, as I've mentioned, but his discovery of the forgetting curve seems to be largely forgotten.

Ebbinghaus also discovered that along with this predictable rate at which we forget information,
there's a process through which we can efficiently move that information to our long-term, easily recalled memory, where it comes out with barely a thought.

How? By reminding ourselves of the information at a set time – specifically, when we're nearly about to forget it. If we remind ourselves too early, it can be good practice but it may be time that could be spent more efficiently just playing or learning something else, not to mention doing the things we need to do in our daily lives outside of playing games. On the other hand, if we remind ourselves too late, no good either – it's like learning all over again, which is inefficient. The trick is to remind ourselves, just before we forget, and space those reminders out over longer and longer periods until the information is comfortably embedded in our long term recall.

For about a hundred years after Ebbinghaus discovered the forgetting curve, the concept was thought to be a scientific curiosity at best. After all, just how are we supposed to calculate when we're going to forget something? If we spent our time just doing that, we'd have very little time to learn anything new, or review it for that matter. It's just far beyond the capacity of most to spend time continuously doing that for each item we learn. But it's NOT beyond the capacity of computers to do it for us.

Enter the Spaced Repetition System. (SRS)

The SRS is a computer program that's like a flashcard system, but smarter. Instead of just shuffling the deck and reviewing the cards in a random way, each card is given a schedule, based upon when you've seen it last, how many times you've seen it, how difficult it was for you to get it right, and so on. When 'answering' each card, you assign a difficulty level to it, based on how easy or hard you found it to get right, and the program adjusts the schedule accordingly. If you found it particularly easy, a little extra time might be added until you see the item again – particularly hard and you'll get that card again a little quicker. Didn't get it right at all or feel uncomfortable with the item? Tell the program, and the schedule for that card will be reset to the beginning and you'll have a chance to review it more often as if you just learned it. It really works – I've personally used it to memorize thousands of kanji (Japanese characters) but this is no great feat of memory. In fact, my memory and concentration are terrible. I mean, really, really terrible – I have chronic fatigue and unfortunately the 'brain fog' that frequently comes along with it.

The SRS program needs to be used daily in order to maximize its effectiveness, and it gets better with more use – the more you use it, the better it gets at scheduling your reviews so you see things you find more difficult more often and things you find less difficult less often.

Now how could this be used for fighting games? That's up to you, but I propose the following approach: Perform the combo, counter, reversal, or whatever the item on the card is, 10 times in a row, on both the left side and right side, and base your response in the program on how easy or hard you found it to accomplish that task. Pretty straightforward!

There are a number of SRS programs out there: Anki, Mnemosyne, and Supermemo are likely the most popular. I recommend Anki, personally – it's flexible, highly customizable, and powerful.

If you have a regular fighting game training routine, there are some skills that would likely be much more well suited to regular, even daily practice than they would be to scheduling with a spaced repetition system. Generic, non-character specific bread and butter combos, difficult links and such may be among them, in order to keep the muscle memory as sharp as possible.

But there are other situations that are much more situational or specific that we simply don't have the time to practice on a regular basis, and as such, they generally get practiced once in a while at best, with no real rhyme or reason behind when we do so, and no systematic approach to implementing them into our game. I know I've personally found myself in the situation of thinking "I wish I had countered X with Y" after a loss – but I didn't, because at the time, I FORGOT.

Suppose you need to figure out counters to some Blanka gimmicks that annoy you, or you have a great combo that only works on Dhalsim, or want to practice a new way to knock out Dark Phoenix during her transformation, or whatever. It's these sorts of matchup and metagame-based situations that are PERFECT to input into SRS, so you get regular, scheduled training in them in the most efficient way possible, which helps you to maximize the amount of time you spend on other things.

Another good, no-mess way to use the SRS to level up that could be of particular use to beginners trying to learn how to play would be to schedule cards around various challenge mode trials. While some of these combos might not be optimized compared to the bread-and-butter combos regularly seen in tournaments, they're certainly not useless and offer a great potential entry point to those first incorporating SRS into their fighting game routine.

The uses are nearly limitless. Want to schedule your footsies practice in training mode against a particular character's best poke? Make a card for it, set the dummy in training mode to play back that poke over and over, and practice. Have a nice option select that works on wakeup? Make a card for it.

Even if you wanted to schedule your practice for a particular character matchup OUTSIDE of training mode, in a live fight, you could make a card for that too, providing you know a player or two who use that character well and they agree to play a few sets whenever that particular card comes up – you can score the card based upon how comfortable you feel with the matchup. Again, the potential is nearly limitless even by yourself, and it only increases as SRS users network with each other to schedule games and exchange information. That sort of efficiency in scheduling could help the whole competitive community level up.

There's also the wonderful possibility of the FGC making decks and sharing them with each other, a very real possibility considering that Anki and other SRS programs allow users to not only create decks but share them with other users of the program. This could help not only with the forgetting curve issue, but the learning curve as well, as character and matchup knowledge becomes increasingly systematized and refined, potentially providing a more efficient jumping-on-point for new players who are serious about getting better.

If you want to practice multiple games, practicing with SRS may help you to juggle your training time more efficiently between them, as the scheduling will adjust according to how easy/hard you find the techniques on the flashcards to perform, meaning that if you're struggling with the cards you've made for one game more than another, you're going to see those cards more often, which helps you level up in the game where you're more lacking.

There are some drawbacks with the spaced repetition approach. For one, it requires a fair bit of daily dedication to maximize its effectiveness – if you miss your daily reviews, it messes up the optimization of your review schedule.

Also, certain fighting games last a long, long time competitively, but not every game can have the longevity of ST or MvC2, or even that of the SF4 series. Others come and go very quickly, while the SRS approach is designed to drill the information in our heads long-term. Before that long term comes, the game might be dead competitively.

But despite these objections, I strongly believe that spaced repetition creates the potential for a a vastly improved, scientific approach to training in fighting games.
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Comments

  • c001357c001357 Time Wizard Joined: Posts: 577
    What the fuck is this.
  • TrugoyTrugoy Wants to be better at this ish.... Joined: Posts: 679
    Simple answer: Someone wanted to share a different way of practicing with us, its a long read, and kind of boring till you get to the SRS bit, but someone showing something i've personally never seen before, so thanks OP.


    More complicated answer:
    It's an attempt to share something the OP thought was beneficial to a training regiment that can be adapted to any game based on the players choice.

    Make flash cards to work on combos for guile, and set a count, do the combo 3 times and then click, the next combo flash card to come up, do that 3 times, or whatever (if i'm reading it right), this way you'll not get bored doing the same thing over and over until you "think" you have it, and you will also be building the muscle memory for the combos without the insane repetition of working on one combo for hours and hours would dictate.
  • LunaSlaveLunaSlave insert title here Joined: Posts: 150
    That's sorta it Trugoy, except the program does the scheduling for you. For example:

    Step 1) learn something new.
    Step 2) go and make a card for it in the SRS.
    Step 3) perform what you've learned, and tell the SRS program how well you were able to do it. You've got 4 choices (at least in Anki, the program I like) - Again, Hard, Good, and Easy. Let's suppose it wasn't super hard, wasn't super easy, so we'll say "Good".
    You'll likely see that card a day later. If, when you're reviewing it again, you say "Good" once more, maybe that card will come up two days after that. Say "Good" again, maybe you'll have to review it a week later. Then 2 weeks. Then a month. Then maybe 2 and a half months. And so on until you're literally spacing each card out for years, as long as you're getting it right. If you said it was "Hard" your review will come a little sooner than if you said "Good" - say "Easy" and it'll come a little later. But if you hit the button that says "Again" - you start off the cycle right at the beginning, as if you just learned it. For example, if the combo you were learning becomes something that is too hard to do because you were spacing out the reviews too long, you might want to hit "Again" to start over, so you can practice the combo on that card more.

    That's it. It's pretty straightforward once you start using it, and VERY useful, so much so that you might want to make cards for anything you're trying to remember, no matter what it is. Just gotta do those reviews daily, and it generally only takes a short time at most. There have been studies on the effects of SRS on students and such, and it's been shown again and again that students that use these programs diligently end up vastly outperforming ones who don't, and can get away with spending less time reviewing the same material as opposed to those who cram, with much better results in both testing and long-term recall. Check this link for some more info:

    Wired Magazine - Want to Remember Everything You'll Ever Learn? Surrender to This Algorithm
  • ExpiratioExpiratio St. HP should be special-cancellable Joined: Posts: 321
    Will give this a try, thanks.
  • SigniaSignia Joined: Posts: 73
    Wow I just might try this. I have already experienced the viability of spaced repetition in Pimsleur Language programs. So this program will allow you to develop training programs using this this principle, that will eventually become optimal?
  • LunaSlaveLunaSlave insert title here Joined: Posts: 150
    Yes! You can use the program to make flashcards out of whatever you want. Most use it for language learning or studying for school, but why not for fighting games? They're a skill to be acquired like anything else, might as well optimize your time and your chances of remembering what you've learned, right? :)
  • aaronlolaaronlol The White Yipes Joined: Posts: 329
    Real talk: German scientists can help anyone win at basically anything what so ever.
    Those mother fuckers create some incredible shit after they got owned in the war.
    PSN: aarontehe
    Just UMVC3 really. And GT5 ^__^
  • phoenixnlphoenixnl Joined: Posts: 643
    Real talk: German scientists can help anyone win at basically anything what so ever.
    Those mother fuckers create some incredible shit after they got owned in the war.
    19th century German scientist....

    19th century was from 1800 till 1899. WW1 started in 1914. Congratulations on your history.

    Anyway, this is an interesting idea, but I really feel the technology isn't there yet for you to SRS practice the stuff that I would find particularly interesting. Like getting the ideal punish of certain moves, every time. For that you would kind of need the dummy to randomise between a string with that unsafe move, and without.

    Other things would be safejump setups, for which you kind of need a dummy to randomise reversalling.

    If trainingmodes were better, this system seems really interesting. I totally recognise that feeling where, like, you block something, and you realise "Fuck I can punish this!", and by the time you remember it and start doing that punish, the opponent had already recovered and you get blown up.
  • nstalkienstalkie Joined: Posts: 53
    Anyway, this is an interesting idea, but I really feel the technology isn't there yet for you to SRS practice the stuff that I would find particularly interesting. Like getting the ideal punish of certain moves, every time. For that you would kind of need the dummy to randomise between a string with that unsafe move, and without.

    Other things would be safejump setups, for which you kind of need a dummy to randomise reversalling.

    If trainingmodes were better, this system seems really interesting. I totally recognise that feeling where, like, you block something, and you realise "Fuck I can punish this!", and by the time you remember it and start doing that punish, the opponent had already recovered and you get blown up.

    Actually there are games where you can do exactly that: record several saveslots, then select to play them back, switching between them randomly. Examples of games where I know this feature is included: Soul Calibur V and Blazblue: Continuum Shift Extend.

    For safe jumps, it depends on what you want to train. If it's just to test if your safejump works: play the character you want to test against and select your own character as the dummy. Then record yourself doing the safe jump.
  • phoenixnlphoenixnl Joined: Posts: 643
    Actually there are games where you can do exactly that: record several saveslots, then select to play them back, switching between them randomly. Examples of games where I know this feature is included: Soul Calibur V and Blazblue: Continuum Shift Extend.

    For safe jumps, it depends on what you want to train. If it's just to test if your safejump works: play the character you want to test against and select your own character as the dummy. Then record yourself doing the safe jump.

    I know some games have that (Had no idea BB:CSE had it though, that's great)

    Obviously you want to practice it, not just test if it works, especially in games where there aren't as many 'setups' and you have to do it more on feel, you should be able to repeat the safejump over and over, and get to practice both what happes on reversal and on hit, and on block.
  • LunaSlaveLunaSlave insert title here Joined: Posts: 150
    I'm quite happy to hear that some of you are interested in trying this. :) Please let me know if it works as well for you as it has for me...

    As for the actual features of training modes, well, IMO the ULTIMATE would be an SRS-based training mode within a fighting game...I can dream, can't I? :)
  • AlexisdabombAlexisdabomb Joined: Posts: 2,528
    I just look to the Will to Power as far as what philosophy could be applied to fighters.
    "I wish someone would flex in front of the camera and say I'm awesome....

    ;_; "

    Dander.
  • G.O.TG.O.T #1 Haggar fan Joined: Posts: 2,164
    Hey HEY HEY! Just Be Reality....Look at Karnov in the AV above me. He knows the deal.
    Fight Fo' Dah Future.
  • aaronlolaaronlol The White Yipes Joined: Posts: 329
    How dare I bring up a different point that doesn't pertain to the date of the thread's topic. I should be ridiculed and burned at the stake for such online blasphemy.
    PSN: aarontehe
    Just UMVC3 really. And GT5 ^__^
  • Gamegenie222Gamegenie222 Joined: Posts: 124
    I have to try this stuff out after I get done with finishing reading this stuff.
  • AlexisdabombAlexisdabomb Joined: Posts: 2,528
    How dare I bring up a different point that doesn't pertain to the date of the thread's topic. I should be ridiculed and burned at the stake for such online blasphemy.

    "About what one cannot speak, one must remain silent."

    Wittgenstein.

    "I wish someone would flex in front of the camera and say I'm awesome....

    ;_; "

    Dander.
  • True GraveTrue Grave Keepaway Specialist Joined: Posts: 3,554
    I try to approach fighting games like i do talking to chicks. If you're not prepared to accept failure, if you're afraid of striking out, you'll never get her. You'll be psychologically compromised and inadvertently send off all the wrong signals.

    Or as to quote a wise Samurai master: "You wonder how victory can be achieved without expectations? One cannot think of victory without also dwelling on its opposite--- Defeat. And it is the fear of defeat that clouds the mind, distracting it from doing what must be done to win. Expect nothing".

    Or another quote: "Go into battle prepared to die and you shall survive. Go into battle expecting to live, and surely you will not".
    "Power without perception, is spiritually useless and therefore of no true value"
  • LunaSlaveLunaSlave insert title here Joined: Posts: 150
    there's a great article from the New York Times on the subject, as it relates to school kids and homework: https://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/11/opinion/sunday/quality-homework-a-smart-idea.html?_r=2&pagewanted=all

    "It sounds unassuming, but spaced repetition produces impressive results. Eighth-grade history students who relied on a spaced approach to learning had nearly double the retention rate of students who studied the same material in a consolidated unit, reported researchers from the University of California-San Diego in 2007. The reason the method works so well goes back to the brain: when we first acquire memories, they are volatile, subject to change or likely to disappear. Exposing ourselves to information repeatedly over time fixes it more permanently in our minds, by strengthening the representation of the information that is embedded in our neural networks."

    Absolutely no reason why we shouldn't be applying this to leveling up in fighting games. The conventional way just seems like it's something for the Dark Ages.
  • VulpesVulpes No. Joined: Posts: 3,678
    his discovery of the forgetting curve seems to be largely forgotten.
    Good thing you reminded us, just in time.
    Why.
  • ViscantViscant Lookin cute, feelin cute Joined: Posts: 1,003
    This is a really interesting post that applies to modern games, MvC3 in particular. The forgetting curve seems to creep up on people faster in Marvel than in other games; you can really tell when somebody has been working on SFxT or has spent their week playing Skullgirls because it gets real ugly real fast. Case in point, what happened at NCR. It's something that I've always understood but not in an actual scientific sense, more in a "I need to play Marvel every day or I start completely forgetting how to play characters that aren't Wesker/Phoenix". I'm glad this got recognized on the front page, this is actual helpful information that people can benefit from. Good work, I'm going to try setting something like this up myself.

    --Jay Snyder
    Viscant@aol.com
  • X_SwordX_Sword -+FGs, Art, and Beats+- Joined: Posts: 1,780
    bookmarked this. im going to read a little bit, practice then come back to it. it'd be cool if you can oversimplify it for, "certain minds" if you dont mind me asking
    --TurntheHeadphonesUp--
    Steam:X_Sword
    swxrdz.deviantart.com
  • LunaSlaveLunaSlave insert title here Joined: Posts: 150
    I am hoping to simplify it somewhat with a video, if I can figure out how to put one together with my non-existent video-making skills. :)
  • MiyomeiMiyomei SonSon is top tier. Joined: Posts: 1,532
    Seconding the Anki tip: I've used it to study languages (French and Japanese), chemistry, biology, and anything else I needed to remember. Even better, there's a free version of Anki for Androids (https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.ichi2.anki&hl=en) that's absolutely fantastic. Great to see SRS applied to things strictly outside the academic field.
  • LunaSlaveLunaSlave insert title here Joined: Posts: 150
    well if you think about it, playing fighting games should be like a language, spoken with hand, stick and buttons. :) Some speak fluently, some speak with a thick accent, some are still babbling like toddlers, and a few among us are wordsmiths and poets capable of intricate wordplay, witty replies and the most devastating of insults, from which there are no comebacks.
  • Kanta-KunKanta-Kun Magnudisto... BLAAAAAAAST Joined: Posts: 5,545
    and a few among us are wordsmiths and poets capable of intricate wordplay, witty replies and the most devastating of insults, from which there are no comebacks.
    There are always comebacks when you have XFACTOR.

    Anyway, great article, a rare gem amidst the general trash on the front page. I'll be looking into implementing this in my training :)
    "I think the game should punch you in the face every time you pick Nova." -ShadyK
  • poochythedogpoochythedog Joined: Posts: 187
    Very interesting article. I'll give it a try, and hopefully it can help my game, even if it's a little bit. Thanks! :)
  • LunaSlaveLunaSlave insert title here Joined: Posts: 150
    very awesome that so many have said they want to try this. It really works - however I would like to give a little bit of a warning. Because the SRS system can space things out for long, long periods of time, if there's something in particular that you feel you need to practice more often, the SRS algorithm might not make you review it enough. The more you get a card 'right' or feel comfortable with it, the longer it gets spaced out on the next review. So if it's something you need to practice all the time, you might want to just reset your progress on that card every once in a while by intentionally getting it 'wrong' just so you see it more often, and also, supplementing your practice in those areas with additional *non*-SRS practice helps too. I hint at that in the article, but just clarifying it a bit more.

    Also, something else I hint at - in Anki at least, if you fail a card too many times (you can set how many in the deck itself) it will 'suspend' that card as a 'leech' - leeches are something that you'll want to take special care with - take note of what your leeches are, work on them significantly outside of your SRS reps so they become easier. If you just throw them back into your deck without doing so they'll unnecessarily 'leech' time away from you and bog you down.
  • Trouble BrewingTrouble Brewing Super Coffee Fighter V Joined: Posts: 5,174 mod
    SRS is indeed gdlk. I've been using Anki for over a year now for Chinese. It's made a massive difference.

    The only downside is my deck has more or less taken on a life of its own. I've been behind on my reviews for a week or so; I have like 2000 cards due right now. Eek.
    The artist formerly known as Starcade RIP
  • KaranovKaranov The Eternal Noob Joined: Posts: 11
    19th century German scientist....

    19th century was from 1800 till 1899. WW1 started in 1914. Congratulations on your history.
    Actually, the 19th century was from 1801 up to and including 1900. See, in our calendar the year 0 doesn't actually exist. As such we start counting at year 1 and thus the first century A.D. was from 1-100, the second century A.D. was from 101-200 and so on. That what you get from using a medieval revision of a roman calendar. As a former history student, I'm pretty much obliged to point this out wherever I can.
    Horrible at fighting games since 1992
  • LunaSlaveLunaSlave insert title here Joined: Posts: 150
    SRS is indeed gdlk. I've been using Anki for over a year now for Chinese. It's made a massive difference.

    The only downside is my deck has more or less taken on a life of its own. I've been behind on my reviews for a week or so; I have like 2000 cards due right now. Eek.

    Yes, it really is gdlk. The thing is, as you point out, you've gotta stay on top of the cards. That's why I suggested that this is more for those prepared to do it every day, and also it's best to not add too many cards at once - considering that it takes longer to practice stuff in a fighting game than it does to say, remember a word in Chinese, if you add too much at once you could get absolutely SWAMPED with reviews before you know it. I'd do no more than a few new cards a day.
  • Number1rickyNumber1ricky Evo Judge!! Hype :) Joined: Posts: 88
    What the fuck is this.
    youre an ass.
  • spongejordan123spongejordan123 The Pot Filler Joined: Posts: 87
    Oh, wow.

    This just FEELS right. Like, I read the opening and I immediately just felt it answering so much shit. Wow.
  • tatakitataki misplaced Joined: Posts: 7,702
    I try to approach fighting games like i do talking to chicks.
    Hit it and quit it?

    Maybe I'll try it to study for my exams...
    Fighting game tutorials, matches, and funny stuff:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/novriltataki
    Former account:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/playtowin
  • IONION Team AirTag Joined: Posts: 319
    Downloading Anki Now!
    www.Twitter.com/AirTag_Ion



    Your signature has been modifed, please read the rules.
  • GhostfreakGhostfreak Mastering the way of the ninja nurse. Joined: Posts: 152
    Hi LunaSlave, I read your article on SRK was a bit curious as to how this pertains and works for fighting games. Now I will be be the first to admit that I am a newb, but I am more than ready to do what it takes to learn as quickly as possible. Especially because my game of choice is Skullgirls. Now I'd like to ask since I feel that your a bit of a veteran at this, not only by the way you speak but also by your confidence in this system. Would it work for this game and me?
  • LunaSlaveLunaSlave insert title here Joined: Posts: 150
    I don't know whether it would work for you or not, Ghostfreak. It really depends on a number of things. Is it something you can devote a little time to every day, in addition to playing and training as usual? That's the real question. If you can do that I really think it can help you, if you use it correctly.

    Also, one thing that's important to note is that you'll have to figure out what the important areas for you to personally work on are, and emphasize those. If you're just new to fighting games, often that comes with play experience more than anything. It's a really important question, though. I don't really think that the game you apply it to matters so much. - it could be Street Fighter or Skullgirls or any fighting game.

    And it won't help you too much with things like reading your opponent, or your ability to get in their head, these are important skills, perhaps the most important skills, in fighitng games. But it can definitely help with familiarizing yourself with a bunch of situations and knowing just what to do in those situations so you respond correctly without a second thought, like knowing what your best punishes are and being able to execute them, or whatever.. It's figuring out *what those situations are* that it won't help with, per se - the most important thing for that is still play experience, and getting lots of time in with that.

    I guess the short answer is, SRS will help you to level up at whatever you get it to help you to level up with, if you're dedicated to using it. But you've gotta figure out what areas you need to work on for yourself, and once you do, the SRS program will help you to focus your time on those areas where you're personally weakest to make you more well rounded.

    Thus far I've really only begun to explore the possibilities myself. I used it for learning and memorizing thousands of Japanese characters, with great success - and now I'm using it for fighting games. Thus far my decks are very basic, primarily focused around trials in SSF4 and mastering those. Will expand to more later to try to squeeze as much as I can out of the system to make the best use of my time, but already I've noticed a marked improvement in my ability to nail combos and such - it's wonderful.
  • jaiwhite205jaiwhite205 Skullgirls PC :D Joined: Posts: 1,125
    Wow I read this just in time. I was actually wondering how I could get the most out of training mode for Skullgirls. I was keeping a list of things I needed to practice, but this is much better. I can use this for school too. I start college in the fall. Good find
    PSN: underK1ller
  • lerp5555lerp5555 Awesome member Joined: Posts: 21
    yo thanks a lot i dl'd anki and will give feedback. i'm also going to tell people at my mma gym about this
  • LunaSlaveLunaSlave insert title here Joined: Posts: 150
    If those of you who have decided to try this method could use this thread to share your experiences with it, constructive feedback, or the results of how it's working for you or whatever, that'd be awesome! I'll be doing the same in a little while, hopefully.
  • elirameliram Joined: Posts: 2
    great read.
    unfortunatly I'm short on time right now, so a daily training routine isent really an option. but when things clear up I will try it out.

    the power of science!
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