Playing With Voltage 2: Electric Boogaloo

ZensoukenZensouken SWAGGASAURUS REXJoined: Posts: 1,128 ✭✭
edited February 2013 in Tech Talk
Hey SRK, I've been trying to figure out this wiring dilemma which has been sitting before me for way too long. I consider myself capable and experienced with electricity and wiring but I'm genuinely stumped on this one.  I have a pair of cold-cathode light bulbs I'm going to use in my custom arcade cabinet, they both have their own CCFL (cold-cathode fluorescent lamp) inverter. Now we're talking 12v current here (input listed on the CCFL inverter) but the output section makes no sense to me; it reads "500L~650L".  I honestly have no idea what the "L" stands for and I'm confused as to what to wire these babies up to? I'm thinking about this power supply but I'm not certain how to go about wiring it up since I would have 2 of the CCFL's and at least 2-4 fans going to the power supply. Otherwise I figured I would just wire the CCFL inverters to AC adapters but I'm not certain which amperage is correct considering that odd "L" designation.  Here is some info about this particular CCFL inverter. Pretty much all of the info I could find about it. :(

Any suggestions on how to get two of these CCFL inverters wired up (plus some insight on some good 12v fans) would be really appreciated. Trying to get this figured out has put a hamper upon my construction process.

Thanks, SRK. - Z 

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Post edited by Zensouken on
ULTIMO MADUROS Y CHIMICHANGAS TRES: SIDE OF DOS EQUIS
Zen's "Winter Is Coming" Grab Bag
Stridering since 1998; I play pragmatic and dirty. You will eat pringles and hate me for it.
PSN IDs: "superschure" [USA] / "suupaashaa" [JPN] (come clash & slash at http://www.twitch.tv/phonytoast)

Comments

  • SkrawneySkrawney Joined: Posts: 90
    Sorry if this is incorrect but this is the only thing that comes to mind when talking about light bulbs, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luminosity
  • Icy Black DeepIcy Black Deep Still training... Joined: Posts: 919 ✭✭✭
    See if you can find a model number on the thing, but from your link (bottom of the page) the answer may be: "Lamp."

    I'm not entirely sure what the rest of your question is; it sounds like the inverters came with the lamps, so you should just wire up the lamps to the outputs of the inverters and you're done.  Unless you're considering wiring something else up to the output of the inverter, which would not be a good plan.
    If you're asking about physical wiring, just wire up the inverters in parallel with anything and everything else that requires 12 Volts.
    If you're asking about the current draw of the lamps, then I don't really know but the 10 Amps the 12-volt supply you linked is a lot and I'd expect it to be plenty.
    New Jersey
  • ZensoukenZensouken SWAGGASAURUS REX Joined: Posts: 1,128 ✭✭
    edited February 2013
    Skrawney said:
    Sorry if this is incorrect but this is the only thing that comes to mind when talking about light bulbs, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luminosity

    See if you can find a model number on the thing, but from your link (bottom of the page) the answer may be: "Lamp."

    I'm not entirely sure what the rest of your question is; it sounds like the inverters came with the lamps, so you should just wire up the lamps to the outputs of the inverters and you're done.  Unless you're considering wiring something else up to the output of the inverter, which would not be a good plan.
    If you're asking about physical wiring, just wire up the inverters in parallel with anything and everything else that requires 12 Volts.
    If you're asking about the current draw of the lamps, then I don't really know but the 10 Amps the 12-volt supply you linked is a lot and I'd expect it to be plenty.

    According to both of your posts, I'm inclined to more readily believe that this "L" may stand for light, lumens, lamps, etc. I suppose it's a scale of how much brightness is outputted based on 12v input. And yes, I should have included a picture of the lamps, they have their own connectors to the other side to the inverters. I just needed to figure out wiring the input but this info you've provided makes sense.  I'll go on and purchase that power supply and try not to explode the place. 

    Now to get some fans and get this ish off the ground.
    Post edited by Zensouken on
    ULTIMO MADUROS Y CHIMICHANGAS TRES: SIDE OF DOS EQUIS
    Zen's "Winter Is Coming" Grab Bag
    Stridering since 1998; I play pragmatic and dirty. You will eat pringles and hate me for it.
    PSN IDs: "superschure" [USA] / "suupaashaa" [JPN] (come clash & slash at http://www.twitch.tv/phonytoast)
  • ZensoukenZensouken SWAGGASAURUS REX Joined: Posts: 1,128 ✭✭
    Hmm, I guess I have another question regarding the power supply. This power supply I linked to earlier provides 12v at 10 Amps and then this one provides 12v at 2 Amps. I'm wondering if it's safer to get the one with less amps or does it really matter in this case?  Thanks again for your suggestions. 
    ULTIMO MADUROS Y CHIMICHANGAS TRES: SIDE OF DOS EQUIS
    Zen's "Winter Is Coming" Grab Bag
    Stridering since 1998; I play pragmatic and dirty. You will eat pringles and hate me for it.
    PSN IDs: "superschure" [USA] / "suupaashaa" [JPN] (come clash & slash at http://www.twitch.tv/phonytoast)
  • Icy Black DeepIcy Black Deep Still training... Joined: Posts: 919 ✭✭✭
    Zensouken said:
    I'm wondering if it's safer to get the one with less amps or does it really matter in this case?
    Well, that all depends.  Since you don't know the total current draw you'll need, it's safer to err on the side of caution and get a larger supply.
    As far as physical safety, both supplies say they feature "overload protection" so they should (I'm assuming) shut off if you accidentally short-circuit something.  But there will be some delay there, so the bigger supply will run more current through whatever it is for that brief time and is therefore more likely to light it on fire.  It's really unlikely, but I have had a POS breadboard catch on fire using an unfused 20-Amp supply before.

    Also, those are both linear power supplies; you may want to have a look at some switching power supplies.  They're generally lighter, cheaper, more efficient, and have a wider range of input voltages.  About the only downside is that they have a little more noise on the output, but I doubt that matters for your application.
    New Jersey
  • ZensoukenZensouken SWAGGASAURUS REX Joined: Posts: 1,128 ✭✭
    Zensouken said:
    I'm wondering if it's safer to get the one with less amps or does it really matter in this case?
    Well, that all depends.  Since you don't know the total current draw you'll need, it's safer to err on the side of caution and get a larger supply.
    As far as physical safety, both supplies say they feature "overload protection" so they should (I'm assuming) shut off if you accidentally short-circuit something.  But there will be some delay there, so the bigger supply will run more current through whatever it is for that brief time and is therefore more likely to light it on fire.  It's really unlikely, but I have had a POS breadboard catch on fire using an unfused 20-Amp supply before.

    Also, those are both linear power supplies; you may want to have a look at some switching power supplies.  They're generally lighter, cheaper, more efficient, and have a wider range of input voltages.  About the only downside is that they have a little more noise on the output, but I doubt that matters for your application.
    I'm not gonna lie, I swear I thought this one was a switching power supply.  Could you suggest one? Either from that site or one that you may know of? 
    ULTIMO MADUROS Y CHIMICHANGAS TRES: SIDE OF DOS EQUIS
    Zen's "Winter Is Coming" Grab Bag
    Stridering since 1998; I play pragmatic and dirty. You will eat pringles and hate me for it.
    PSN IDs: "superschure" [USA] / "suupaashaa" [JPN] (come clash & slash at http://www.twitch.tv/phonytoast)
  • Icy Black DeepIcy Black Deep Still training... Joined: Posts: 919 ✭✭✭
    edited February 2013
    Zensouken said:
    I'm not gonna lie, I swear I thought this one was a switching power supply.  Could you suggest one? Either from that site or one that you may know of? 
    It doesn't specifically say, but the "Dual AC input 115vac/230vac, selectable by jumper" part leads me to believe it's linear.  Switching power supplies (at least modern ones) generally take a wide range of input voltages and don't need to be configured, but linear supplies need to physically reconfigure whether the two segments of the input side of the transformer are in parallel or series.

    DigiKey is usually my go-to electronics parts site, but they have way too many options to make it easy to look for something like this.
    Newark is making it easier, see how this looks to you (and change the search parameters as appropriate).  Mauser is also good.  Unless you're not in the US, then I don't know what the heck web site you'd use.

    Post edited by Icy Black Deep on
    New Jersey
  • ZensoukenZensouken SWAGGASAURUS REX Joined: Posts: 1,128 ✭✭
    image

    Let there be light! Only problem I really had during the wiring-up process was failing at securing the molex connectors but I'm pretty sure the gauge of wire was just too narrow to properly touch the contacts. Thanks for your help, I've got this sucker working and nothing exploded. 
    ULTIMO MADUROS Y CHIMICHANGAS TRES: SIDE OF DOS EQUIS
    Zen's "Winter Is Coming" Grab Bag
    Stridering since 1998; I play pragmatic and dirty. You will eat pringles and hate me for it.
    PSN IDs: "superschure" [USA] / "suupaashaa" [JPN] (come clash & slash at http://www.twitch.tv/phonytoast)
  • ZensoukenZensouken SWAGGASAURUS REX Joined: Posts: 1,128 ✭✭
    MOAR ELECTRICAL WOES!!! I'm wiring up the power to my arcade cab and may have hit a wall figuring out the rocker switch. Cross-posting this from Arcade Controls hoping someone here has a clue, thanks in advance!!
    on 1381219674:
    HALP!!! I'm trying to get this arcade cab of mine powered up so I can relax at night but I've hit a wall with wiring up these components. I have a power strip (surge protector) with the plug cut off, a receptacle to receive that plug and connect to an external plug towards the wall outlet, and lastly I want to get an illuminated rocker switch in the middle of the the receptacle and the power strip so I can turn the cab on/off without having to open it.

    I'm working off of NA wiring standards with these components (BLACK = LIVE, WHITE = NEUTRAL, GREEN = GROUND) with the external plug having E(GROUND), L(LIVE), and N(NEUTRAL). I'm basing everything off of the external plug since that's where the main power is being drawn from. I will also be referring to GROUND as being on the bottom since it just sounds right.

    So with the receptacle LIVE is on the left, GROUND on the bottom, and NEUTRAL on the right; how do I wire these to the rocker switch and then subsequently to the power strip. Honestly the rocker switch diagram is confusing the hell out of me. Also I made the rookie mistake of just matching colors and linking everything which ended up tripping the breaker.

    This resulted in my asian wife yelling, a lot; which then resulted in my half-asian daughter yelling in tandem. Help me get this sucker powered up, men. :cry:

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    on 1381249442:
    I started to read some literature on the way to class today and figured out that the SPST switch is much like an ordinary light switch and it's basically an interrupter for ONE power line only. Granted I've assessed this information correctly I drew up two wiring diagrams, the top one being how the receptacle would be wired to the the power strip in absence of the rocker switch, and on the bottom what I'm guessing is the correct connection setup with the rocker switch.

    I have the LIVE wire going to the L prong on the rocker switch and leaving the LOAD prong then heading to the power strip; and then the GROUND wire doing the same on the N prong as I'm assuming that the rocker switch needs GROUND to illuminate, and the NEUTRAL going directly from the receptacle to the power strip.

    How's this look?

    IMG_0740_zps66e820d8.jpg
    ULTIMO MADUROS Y CHIMICHANGAS TRES: SIDE OF DOS EQUIS
    Zen's "Winter Is Coming" Grab Bag
    Stridering since 1998; I play pragmatic and dirty. You will eat pringles and hate me for it.
    PSN IDs: "superschure" [USA] / "suupaashaa" [JPN] (come clash & slash at http://www.twitch.tv/phonytoast)
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