The Sanwa and Seimitsu FAQ

Paik4LifePaik4Life Team HnIJoined: Posts: 1,212
Okay, this has been a long time coming. A lot of people new and old to joystick building/modding have questions about Sanwa and Seimitsu parts. Maybe they?re just new to Japanese parts or new to specific parts from either of these companies. Either way this FAQ is intended to be the one-stop thread for answering these questions so that I don?t have to see new threads asking the same questions : ) Let?s get to it then!

Let?s start with the VERY basics and go with some terminology:

Companies:
Sanwa: The largest and most popular Japanese arcade parts manufacturer. Best known for their flagship JLF-TP-8Y joysticks and OBSF/OBSN buttons. You can download their latest catalogue here (courtesty of TheRealNeoGeo and Akihabara Shop):
http://www.akihabarashop.jp/catalogs/Sanwa0708.pdf
Seimitsu: The second largest and most popular Japanese arcade parts manufacturer. Best known for their LS-32/LS-32-01 joystick and their PS-14-G/PS-14-GN buttons. You can download their latest catalogue here (courtesy of TheRealNeoGeo):
http://www.akihabarashop.jp/catalogs/Seimitsu2007.pdf

I made a small Sanwa joystick movie today:
http://www.akihabarashop.jp/misc/AkihabaraSanwaJoysticks.mp4

And the old Seimitsu joystick movie is not so big as it used to be (from 120mb to about 65mb):
http://www.akihabarashop.jp/misc/AkihabaraSeimitsuJoysticks.mp4

Hope this helps a little to those who are having problem viewing them :).



Happ: The largest and most popular US arcade parts manufacturer. Best known for their Competition joystick and Competition buttons.

Joystick and Button Parts:
Microswitch: An electronic component found in both joysticks and buttons that when activated complete a circuit between the ground and signal connection.
PCB: An acronym for printed circuit board. Some joysticks have microswitches connected to a PCB and used pinned output instead of tabs or direct soldering to microswitches.
Mounting plate: Metal plate attached to the base of the joystick. This is mounted to the control panel with the use of screw or nuts and bolts.
Wire harness: A molex connector that is used on certain joystick PCBs. Sanwa manufactures JLF-H and Seimitsu manufactures H5-PIN.
Restrictor/gate: Device that restricts the movement of the joystick to a specific pattern or shape.
Square restrictor/gate: The standard for joysticks. This has corner/notches in the up-right, up-left, down-left, and down-right directions only. Being a square, the distance from the center of the gate to the corners is longer than the distance from the center to up, down, left, and right directions.
Octagon restrictor/gate: This has defined corner/notches in all 8 directions. Each notched direction is equidistant from the center. Sanwa's octagon restrictor for the JLF series is the GT-Y.
Circular restrictor: This has no defined notches making a perfect circle path. Every possible direction is equidistant from the center; however, this does not mean that the stick recognizes all possible directions. Sanwa's circular restrictor for the JLW series is the GT-0.
Snap-in push buttons: The most common type of buttons that secure to a control panel with tabs that ?grip? onto certain material thicknesses. Examples are the Sanwa OBSF and the Seimistu PS-14-G.
Screw-in push buttons: These types of buttons are threaded and are secured onto control panels with a threaded nut for a stronger more versatile hold. Examples are the Sanwa OBSN and Seimitsu PS-14-GN.

Electrical:
Ground: The common electrical signal that must be connected to a signal connection for a switch to activate.
Signal: The electrical signal specific to each input.
Quick disconnect: A terminal that is crimped onto the ends of wires. These terminals then plug onto the tabs on a microswitch.

Miscellaneous:
2-way: Movement that allows inputs of either left or right (also up or down).
4-way: Movement that allows inputs of up, down, left, or right. Many classic games like Pac-Man use 4-way joysticks. Many people equate 4-way movement with square gates, but this is INCORRECT as they are talking about two different principles/properties of joysticks.
8-way: Movement that allows inputs of up-right, up, up-left, left, down-left, down, down-right, right. Most modern games use 8-way joysticks. Many people equate 8-way movement with octagon gates, but this is INCORRECT as they are talking about two different principles/properties of joysticks.
Throw: A term used to describe the maximum distance/angle a joystick lever can be moved from the neutral position.
Engage: A term used to describe the distance a joystick lever must be moved before a switch is activated.
Deadzone: A term used to describe the area surrounding the neutral position where the joystick can be moved but not yet activate a switch. The maximum distance from the neutral position is obviously less than the engage.
«13456735

Comments

  • Paik4LifePaik4Life Team HnI Joined: Posts: 1,212
    With that out of the way, let?s move on to some common questions first!

    Q: What?s the big deal about Japanese parts? What?s the real difference between US (Happ) and Japanese parts (Sanwa/Seimitsu)?
    A: Japanese parts are a different style and type of parts for different types of players. There are a number of differences in the construction and feel for both the joysticks and the buttons. In the end, it?s all a matter of preference, but to help you along the way this guide will outline the general differences in order to help form your own opinions/preferences.

    Q: Can you compare and contrast Happ joysticks with Sanwa and Seimitsu joysticks?
    A: Sure, I?ll help you out! The first difference people notice is the look. Happ parts are fitted with a bat top (sometimes called tear drop) while Sanwa and Seimitsu come standard with a ball top (sometimes called gumball). Let it be known that Sanwa sells a bat top (LB-30N) accessory that can be fitted to any Sanwa or Seimitsu joystick.

    In terms of feel, Happ have a harder spring causing stronger tension leading to more resistance. Aside from the Perfect 360s, both US and Japanese parts are restricted to square movements. Japanese parts typically have easy switching to 4-way operation (Seimitsu often come with 2-way option in their gates as well). Sanwa sells extra restrictor gates for circular (JLW models only), octagon (JLF models only), and 2-way (both JLF and JLW models).

    Q: Can you compare and contrast Happ push buttons with Sanwa and Seimitsu push buttons?
    A: The biggest difference between the two is the ?clicking? feel that is associated with Happ buttons. When depressed, the buttons will click indicating the button is activated. Japanese parts do not have this sounds/feel. Japanese buttons require much less force to activate the switch.

    In terms of construction, both use spring as the basis of resistance. Happ parts are much longer than both Sanwa and Seimitsu parts. Happ makes both concave and convex buttons. Sanwa and Seimitsu make buttons that are convex only although Seimitsu snap-in buttons have very little to no convex shape.

    Q: Which company is better? Sanwa or Seimitsu?
    A: Depending on what you?re looking for in your joysticks and buttons, the answer is different. Although Sanwa is the more popular brand in Japan, Seimitsu is also very popular. It?s almost like asking Coca-Cola or Pepsi. Each camp can boast a large hardcore following but then there are a large amount of people who honestly find both to be great with no strong preference to either. When it comes to comparable parts, Sanwa is more expensive and is often regarded as being more ruggedly built with finer materials.

    Q: Which Sanwa or Seimitsu joystick is the best for fighting games?
    A: I know it?s getting redundant but once again it all comes down to preference. The two most popular joysticks for fighters are the Sanwa JLF series and the Seimitsu LS-32 series, but then there?s a lot of support for the Sanwa JLW series as well as the other Seimitsu series like the LS-40 or LS-55 series.

    Although I will not make a definitive statement on which stick is better or the best, I will outline the differences between the two companies? flagship joysticks.

    The Sanwa JLF is the most popular Japanese style joystick. It goes against the standard levered microswitches found in nearly every other joystick manufactured by any company. The JLF microswitches are connected to a PCB with a 5-pin output. Comes stock with a square gate for 8-way operation but can be turned 45 degrees for 4-way operation.

    The Seimitsu LS-32/LS-32-01 is the second most popular Japanese style joystick. It has traditional levered microswitches that either have tabs for .187? quick disconnects (LS-32) or are connected to a PCB with a 5-pin output (LS-32-01). The LS-32 series has a harder spring for greater tension and resistance as well as a shorter throw and smaller deadzone. Comes stock with a restrictor plate that can be adjusted to 2-way, 4-way, or 8-way operation. In terms of price, the LS-32/LS-32-01 is around half the price give or take.

    For detailed measurements on Sanwa and Seimitsu sticks, see here (courtesy of kowal):
    http://www.kowal.itcom.pl/ArcadeParts_pliki/artZESen.htm

    Q: Which Sanwa or Seimitsu button is the best?
    A: Haha, you guessed correctly. It?s opinion again. And once again instead of taking sides, I?ll just note the major differences.

    In terms of operation, each comparable button will last about the same. The Sanwa RG and Seimitsu GX series both use higher end microswitches which last 5 times longer than the normal microswitches from either company. Sanwa are reputed to be more sensitive than Seimitsu. Seimitsu offers a larger variety of colors, color combinations, and finishes (pearl-like and transparent finishes) than Sanwa. Seimitsu buttons cost a little less than Sanwa.

    Note that in terms of performance and feel there is no difference between the Sanwa snap-ins and screw-ins. For the Seimitsu snap-ins and screw-ins, the only difference is the curvature of the button. As stated previously, the Seimitsu snap-ins are nearly flat with little to no curve while the screw-ins have more curve that is comparable to the Sanwa buttons.
  • Paik4LifePaik4Life Team HnI Joined: Posts: 1,212
    edited August 2013
    With those general questions out of the way, we?ll move onto questions that will help with building/modding.

    Button installation:
    24mm (OBSF-24/OBSN-24 and PS-14-D/PS-14-DN) and 30mm (OBSF-30/OBSN-30 and PS-14-G/PS-14-GN) buttons from Sanwa and Seimitsu refer to the diameter of the holes that they will fit into. Snap-in buttons from both companies grip to 2-4mm material thicknesses while screw-ins from both companies hold on to upwards of 8mm.

    All the buttons from Sanwa and Seimitsu have .110? tabs for their microswitches. .110? quick disconnects plug onto these tabs perfectly.

    Lastly, keep in mind that each button needs a minimum internal clearance to fit; however, this clearance is usually less than the clearance needed for the joystick. The Sanwa RG and Seimitsu GX buttons are extra long and would need the extra internal clearance.

    Joystick installation:
    The standard mounting height for Japanese joysticks is to have 23-24mm of shaft above the control panel to the bottom of the balltop. Depending on the stick and the mounting plates being installed, you will have to calculate how deep you will have to install the stick.

    For Japanese sticks, it is highly recommended that you top mount the joystick unless your top panel is metal. In some cases, it is essential to top mount. To top mount joysticks, you will need to use a tool that can create a recessed area the size of your mounting plate at the correct depth. (For mounting plate dimensions please go to http://akihabarashop.com/products.html and thank TheRealNeoGeo for providing these measurements and Japanese parts!). Additionally, you will need to have a tool that will create a hole in the control panel so that the base of the stick can fit through and attach to the mounting plate from beneath the control panel.

    If you use a layer of acrylic (plexi) or polycarbonate (lexan) you will need to drill a 24mm hole for the shaft to fit through. This hole is large enough so that the joystick will move in all directions freely.

    To remove the balltop from the shaft, use a flathead screwdriver and hold the bottom of the shaft in place while turning the balltop counter-clockwise. To replace the balltop perform the same task in reverse.

    All the joysticks from Sanwa and Seimitsu that do not have a 5-pin output have .187? tabs for their microswitches. .187? quick disconnects plug onto these tabs perfectly.

    For the mapping of 5-pin for the JLF see this diagram (once again made by TheRealNeoGeo):
    http://akihabarashop.jp/misc/sanwakopplingen.JPG

    And one for the LS-32-01 (again by TheRealNeoGeo):
    http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a141/Paik4Life/Useful%20Photos/7b31b058.jpg

    Lastly, keep in mind that each stick needs a minimum internal clearance to fit. Generally, a minimum internal clearance should be 1.6? but 1.75? would be a safer bet.

    And that's that for now! Feel free to post away. I'll make edits when I see fit!

    ~Paik
    Post edited by Paik4Life on
  • laurie47laurie47 UK stickman Joined: Posts: 340
    Well done mate. Sticky time.
  • RakukojinRakukojin Joined: Posts: 309
    Sanwa Catalog (Thanks to TheRealNeoGeo)
    http://arkadesticks.com/sanwaca.zip
    http://www.akihabarashop.com/catalogs/Sanwa.pdf

    Seimitsu Catalog (Thanks to TheRealNeoGeo)
    http://www.arkadesticks.com/seimitsuca.zip
    http://www.akihabarashop.com/catalogs/Seimitsu.pdf

    Sanwa/Seimitsu Comparision Chart (Thanks to kowal)
    http://img95.imageshack.us/img95/4286/beztytuuco8.gif

    This thread deserves a sticky :party:
  • RushingMonkeyRushingMonkey making panic around Joined: Posts: 77
    from my experience, it's not that seimitsu buttons are less sensitive than sanwa's, I feel they just have an harder spring.

    great thread btw, sticky plz! :clap:
  • dongledongle Joined: Posts: 46
    Excellent, thanks!
  • NiteWalkerNiteWalker For me it was Friday. Joined: Posts: 1,668
    Great work as usual Paik.

    Now someone stick this shiz!
    On a never ending quest for the perfect arcade stick.
    SimpleCase Custom Arcade Stick Enclosures
  • FusuluFusulu lurking Joined: Posts: 67 ✭✭✭✭✭ OG
    Alot of good info!
    Thanks Paik! :tup:
    ...
  • GreenGreen jay's dad Joined: Posts: 2,267
    Mincing words here, but...
    <Microswitch: An electronic component found in both joysticks and buttons that when activated create a circuit between the ground and live connection.>
    Technically the circuit is already there. When actuated, the switch closes the circuit.
    pride is beautiful
  • Paik4LifePaik4Life Team HnI Joined: Posts: 1,212
    Thanks Raku, I was too lazy to find the links for the catalogues that TRNG hosted on his sites. I've edited them in.

    Green, thanks for the correction. I rreally meant "complete the circuit" instead of creating one. Heh. Edited!

    ~Paik
  • SystemSystem Joined: Posts: 508,676 admin
    Thanks Raku, I was too lazy to find the links for the catalogues that TRNG hosted on his sites. I've edited them in.

    Green, thanks for the correction. I rreally meant "complete the circuit" instead of creating one. Heh. Edited!

    ~Paik


    Should've made a pdf file with info Paik.
  • RushingMonkeyRushingMonkey making panic around Joined: Posts: 77
    the Seimitsu snap-ins are nearly flat with little to no curve while the screw-ins have more curve that is comparable to the Sanwa buttons.

    quick question:

    does this apply to Seimitsu PS-14-K (skeletons / transparent) buttons? I was planning to use them + some Seimitsu standard screw-ins (PS-14-GN) on my next stick, and already ordered them... hope the feeling of the buttons isn't very different :sad:

    (didn't ordered the PS-14-G snap-ins since their bezel seems very different from others)
  • SystemSystem Joined: Posts: 508,676 admin
    nice stuff man:tup:
  • kowalkowal smell like Sanwa Joined: Posts: 400
    Throw: A term used to describe the distance a joystick lever must be moved before a switch is activated.
    this definition describes engagement. Throw this maximum trwavel/angle of joystick from plumb - line.
    Luftwaffe use only Suzo
  • MayhemMayhem Mostly Harmless Joined: Posts: 577
    Comes stock with a square gate for 8-way operation but can be turned 90 degrees for 4-way operation.
    Turning it 90 would still result in an 8-way square, 45 on the other hand would give you a 4-way rhombus. Other than that very good work. I actually wrote a similar guide just a couple of days ago for a Swedish beat 'em up community.
    Once I start I cannot stop myself
  • Paik4LifePaik4Life Team HnI Joined: Posts: 1,212
    Thanks to both kowal and Mayhem for corrections to my mistakes : )

    ~Paik
  • Dj_MatrixDj_Matrix Joined: Posts: 554
    lol beat me to posting... bout time and yes this needs sticky...
  • kowalkowal smell like Sanwa Joined: Posts: 400
    you can add the definitions of engagement under definition of throw, this is important parameter
    Engage: A term used to describe the distance a joystick lever must be moved before a switch is activated.
    :tup:
    Luftwaffe use only Suzo
  • MayhemMayhem Mostly Harmless Joined: Posts: 577
    you can add the definitions of engagement under definition of throw, this is important parameter
    Might be a good idea to add to add a definition for deadzone as well, i.e. the area in the center of the stick where no switch is activated yet. Also mention that as well as having a shorter throw the LS-32 has a smaller deadzone as well.
    Once I start I cannot stop myself
  • CowdiseaseCowdisease What? Joined: Posts: 358
    quick question:

    does this apply to Seimitsu PS-14-K (skeletons / transparent) buttons? I was planning to use them + some Seimitsu standard screw-ins (PS-14-GN) on my next stick, and already ordered them... hope the feeling of the buttons isn't very different :sad:

    (didn't ordered the PS-14-G snap-ins since their bezel seems very different from others)
    According to Akihabarashop.com
    Seimitsu PS-14-K 300
    Snap-in / Diameter 30 mm / Weight 12 g

    Also known as skeleton buttons, both plunger and bezel on these are clear. Similar in performance to PS-14-G.
  • RushingMonkeyRushingMonkey making panic around Joined: Posts: 77
    According to Akihabarashop.com

    ok, they may be similar in performance but bezels are clearly different:

    seimitsu-PS14G.jpg

    seimitsu-PS14K.jpg
  • MayhemMayhem Mostly Harmless Joined: Posts: 577
    ok, they may be similar in performance but bezels are clearly different:
    Indeed, the performance quote only refers to the microswitch which (to my knowledge) is the same.
    Once I start I cannot stop myself
  • RushingMonkeyRushingMonkey making panic around Joined: Posts: 77
    maybe this can help to explain the throw/engage problem?

    throwengagevt2.th.jpg

    (measurements are approximative :P)
  • kowalkowal smell like Sanwa Joined: Posts: 400
    RushingMonkey: this is well:wgrin:
    Paik4Life: you can replenish pictures your descriptions
    http://kowal.itcom.pl/Files/Emu/photo.zip
    Luftwaffe use only Suzo
  • GreenGreen jay's dad Joined: Posts: 2,267
    The plungers in my Seimitsu screw-ins are a little taller than Sanwa snap-ins (not exactly sure), if that's any help.
    pride is beautiful
  • SystemSystem Joined: Posts: 508,676 admin
    ahhhhh!! I can't move. I must of stepped in sumthin STICKY!!!
  • vkuwabaravkuwabara Joined: Posts: 361
    very good!!

    About US parts vs Jap parts, is HAPP the only US-style manufacturer that has the same quality as sanwa/seimitsu? it's because a friend of mine says that it's all the same shit (the common manufacturer here is 'EM')
  • SystemSystem Joined: Posts: 508,676 admin
    Generally the companies are Happ, Sanwa, Seimitsu, Suzo, and Fanta.......depending on which part of the world you are in. There are knockoffs and clones of the above, but these are the big ones.
  • Paik4LifePaik4Life Team HnI Joined: Posts: 1,212
    RushingMonkey: Sorry that I missed this question before. I don't have first hand experience with the PS-14-K. I believe they have a similar convexness to the screw-ins. I know the PS-14-P have screw-in convexness. I believe only the PS-14-G and PS-14-D are the only ones that are flat-like. I honestly do not know the reason.

    vkuwarbara: Happ is just the major company in the US. Their quality is very good. I just defined them here for comparison purposes. I did not write more on their products since this is a Sanwa/Seimitsu FAQ, and I personally much prefer Japanese parts. Although someone should think about putting up a Happ FAQ.

    For everyone who's helping. Thanks. The FAQ is far from complete. I just covered the main bases. I'll provide links to pics where necessary in time (thanks kowal), but for now, I think it's in good shape.

    Again, any correction or suggestions will be edited in when I think they are useful and when I have the time. Big updates like pics for everything will come when I have another large chunk of time.

    ~Paik
  • CowdiseaseCowdisease What? Joined: Posts: 358
    Here's an interesting question. We're aware that if you're using a Sanwa joystick with Seimitsu buttons, you'll need to buy a Seimitsu joystick balltop for your Sanwa joystick to match your Seimitsu buttons (the reverse is true for Seimitsu joystick and Sanwa buttons).

    My question is which brand's color closely matches that of Happ competition buttons? I want a stick with a Sanwa joystick and Happ competition buttons, and I was wondering if the Sanwa balltop would closely match the color of Happ buttons, or if I need to get a Seimitsu balltop.
  • RushingMonkeyRushingMonkey making panic around Joined: Posts: 77
    RushingMonkey: Sorry that I missed this question before. I don't have first hand experience with the PS-14-K. I believe they have a similar convexness to the screw-ins. I know the PS-14-P have screw-in convexness. I believe only the PS-14-G and PS-14-D are the only ones that are flat-like. I honestly do not know the reason.

    ~Paik

    thank you very much ;) it seems that my pack is gonna arrive in few days, so hopefully I can confirm this soon.
  • CheeseyCheesey Old School Joined: Posts: 157 ✭✭✭✭✭ OG
    How can you tell a knockoff from a genuine sanwa button?
  • SystemSystem Joined: Posts: 508,676 admin
    sanwa buttons say sanwa on the underside. The microswitch too.
  • bafiaris13bafiaris13 strava tsibukia Joined: Posts: 541
    I noticed on both catalogs that the layouts between 1p and 2p are different...

    the 1p look like HRAP1 while 2p like HRAP2..how come?
    KOI..
  • Paik4LifePaik4Life Team HnI Joined: Posts: 1,212
    It's because normally the 1P sides takes up more space because it's right-handed playing style. That gives 2P less room so he's kind of pushed over and the buttons are adjusted as such.

    Think about it at a restaurant booth. If the wall is on the left side of the booth, the person sitting on the inside (who is right-handed) takes up more than half the table due to his right arm being positioned normally. The person to the right of him shift over more on the table and might even have his right elbow hanging over the edge of the table (which doesn't affect his eating but effectively reduces his table space).

    ~Paik
  • NiteWalkerNiteWalker For me it was Friday. Joined: Posts: 1,668
    I was thinking the same thing but wasn't 100% sure because I've never played on a japanese cab outside of Tekken 5 DR.

    Makes logical sense though.
    On a never ending quest for the perfect arcade stick.
    SimpleCase Custom Arcade Stick Enclosures
  • bafiaris13bafiaris13 strava tsibukia Joined: Posts: 541
    yes i thought so too but why then make 2 different layouts on stick..lol

    in case someone's stuck in playing on one side and then not be able to change???

    anyways..thanks
    KOI..
  • SystemSystem Joined: Posts: 508,676 admin
    I'm looking at the 2p astro city panel on the sanwa catalog atm and both sides look like the HRAP2 layout to me, just that the 2p side is angled about 20 degrees (but still the same layout) @_@
  • edmondantesedmondantes Psychopathic Thinker Joined: Posts: 120
    how would you choose between seimitsu 32 and the 01 model? Faq says they're set up differently, so what's the advantage in paying ~$1 extra for the 01 model?
    King of Third Strike (NC '07)
  • Paik4LifePaik4Life Team HnI Joined: Posts: 1,212
    For full details on the differences, please go to
    http://akihabarashop.com/products.html

    The main difference is that the LS-32-01 has the microswitches attached to a PCB with a 5-pin output similar to the JLF series. The 5-pin cable (H5 pin) is included with the LS-32-01. The LS-32 does not have a PCB and you wire the live and the ground directly to the tabbed microswitches.

    The secondary difference is that the LS-32-01 has an s-shaped mounting plate. LS-32 has a flat mounting plate.

    On a side note, LS-32-01 PCBs are printed with LS-32-02 even though LS-32-02 does not exist in the catalog. TheRealNeoGeo explained to me that he believes this was due to a mistake by Seimitsu. Probably when they had to make a new PCB after problems with the original PCB. Thanks Per!

    EDIT: I took the time to link pictures for parts throughout the first three posts. Parts are courtesy of Per and AkihabaraShop. Thanks again, Per! : )

    ~Paik
  • RushingMonkeyRushingMonkey making panic around Joined: Posts: 77
    package arrived, so I can update about PS-14-GN (seimitsu standard screw-ins) vs PS-14-K (seimitsu transparent button, snap-in) ;)

    the convexness of the plungers is the same, and the bezels are the same too (so it's not the "flat" bezel of the standard snap-ins - but this was also clear from the pics on akihabarashop tough). the surprise is that the height of the plungers is actually different. PS-14-K is lower, and it doesn't seem to have the typical "2 stage travel" of seimitsu screw-ins (which is well described in this thread).
  • RushingMonkeyRushingMonkey making panic around Joined: Posts: 77
    why this thread isn't stickied yet? :annoy: btw I have another n00by question :P
    The Sanwa JLF is the most popular Japanese style joystick. It goes against the standard levered microswitches found in nearly every other joystick manufactured by any company. The JLF microswitches are connected to a PCB with a 5-pin output. Comes stock with a square gate for 8-way operation but can be turned 45 degrees for 4-way operation.

    I tried, but I couldn't figure out HOW to solidly snap the rescrictor in, when turned 45 degrees. Any suggestion?
  • kowalkowal smell like Sanwa Joined: Posts: 400
    image1674uo1.th.gif
    image3170mr5.th.gif
    Luftwaffe use only Suzo
  • MayhemMayhem Mostly Harmless Joined: Posts: 577
    I tried, but I couldn't figure out HOW to solidly snap the rescrictor in, when turned 45 degrees. Any suggestion?
    You should be able to separately rotate the centerpiece of the restrictor.
    Once I start I cannot stop myself
  • RushingMonkeyRushingMonkey making panic around Joined: Posts: 77
    cool, I didn't know it was possible to separate the central piece from the rest of the restrictor. thank you both very much and sorry again for the n00b question :D
  • leavealleaveal not in it for the $$ Joined: Posts: 602
    holy hell, i never noticed that. O_o thanks for pointing that out!
    "Get one that is programmed to never play rap/hip-hop/R&B."
    -Shin00bi, car stereo advice thread
  • 2hai2hai Joined: Posts: 171
    Well i always heard about the Sanwa Flash and stuff, and since this is a FAQ thread, I was hoping someone could answer questions of curosity. I know that the Sanwa Flash plays on optics and stuff rather than switches, but whats the real difference in like quality/build and playing with it. Would it might be similar to the P360 version.

    Assuming TRNG is able to get Flash (fingers crossing), how would i go about it mounting/installing it. Let's say like a hrap or something. I know about the 5 pin, but the 3 pin for voltage, what do i do with this (as u can see, i'm not really bright with joysticks or electronics for the matter of fact.).

    Thanx for any answers.
  • Paik4LifePaik4Life Team HnI Joined: Posts: 1,212
    I don't think mods with sticky this thread since they are trying to keep the stickies to a minimum. It would be nice for it to be included in the Essential Stick Building Thread or whatever though. Oh well, doesn't matter to me.

    The Sanwa Flash is basically a JLF stick with a different PCB. You also have a few extra things like the 3-pin which is used for the 5V (to power optics), rubber ring, and clear plastic ring (both used between the PCB and the base of the stick).

    Being the same as the JLF, it uses the same mounting plates and can be mounted the same exact way. It also uses the same restrictors/gates as the JLF.

    I will probably add a Flash1 section to the FAQ soon, since Per is probably going to get the Flash1 back for us even if it is a limited run.

    ~Paik
  • SystemSystem Joined: Posts: 508,676 admin
    For Japanese sticks, it is highly recommended that you top mount the joystick unless your top panel is metal. In some cases, it is essential to top mount. To top mount joysticks, you will need to use a tool that can create a recessed area the size of your mounting plate at the correct depth. (For mounting plate dimensions please go to http://akihabarashop.com/products.html and thank TheRealNeoGeo for providing these measurements and Japanese parts!). Additionally, you will need to have a tool that will create a hole in the control panel so that the base of the stick can fit through and attach to the mounting plate from beneath the control panel.

    I'm looking to make my first stick using a sanwa JLF-TP-8YT. Never made a joystick before so really very new to this.

    I WAS planning on using a 1/2" thick surface as the top surface of my base (probably using MDF), looking at the pics of the sanwa sticks and mounting plates it appears that the plate sits on top of the main components (of the joystick) with the stick coming out from that. So in 1/2" thick board would I be attaching the mounting plate to the underside with the stick obviously sticking through a hole?

    That seems to be how to mount the stick, but this would leave very little shaft (after going through 1/2" of board) sticking out the top.

    If this is the correct way of mounting the stick is it possible to use 1/4" board with a circular hole for the stick and another 1/4" board underneath it with the hole for the stick/mounting plate?
  • Paik4LifePaik4Life Team HnI Joined: Posts: 1,212
    Your post was kind of convoluted but basically if you top you have to make a hole through the top panel that is are enough to fit the base of the joystick. In addition to that you must make a recess around that hole so that the mounting plate will sit inside of it. When you're done with the top panel it should look something like this:

    http://s10.photobucket.com/albums/a141/Paik4Life/Stainable%20Case/?action=view&current=a50489d0.jpg&refPage=&imgAnch=imgAnch8

    When you put the JLF in that area, the mounting plate and joystick will fit in that area and the mounting plate will be BELOW the top panel. NOT sitting on top. It should not even be flush with the top panel otherwise it will be sitting a little too high.

    http://s10.photobucket.com/albums/a141/Paik4Life/Cap%20Hustler/?action=view&current=d87a9ef2.jpg&refPage=&imgAnch=imgAnch3

    Hope that is helpful. If you want, you can read my other thread and find out more, but I do not suggest you follow it since it's a more advanced method of building sticks that only TheRealNeoGeo (you could call him my mentor, heh heh) and myself use, but there might be some other helpful information for you.

    ~Paik
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