Tips thread

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  • fistoftheryustarfistoftheryustar Joined: Posts: 2,170
    Do you think its weird or "cheap" to trace your own drawing that you made on the computer? I drew smething that came out pretty good in MS Paint and I put a sheet of paper over the screen and traced it. Usually you should be good enough to just do it over again without tracing. Is that considered cheap by most people? Im not an art student, I dont know what the "code" is.
    My drawing:
    Mai cheats on Ryu - "Shin Shoryuken!"

    http://forums.shoryuken.com/showpost.php?p=7115525&postcount=252
  • Bland_WolfBland_Wolf Are You OK? Joined: Posts: 419
    not really. artists trace over their work all the time, usually when transferring the lines to different or bigger paper. some people just redraw the whole thing. you're pretty much doing the same thing so it's up to you. i'm guessing you don't have a printer tho if you have to trace on the screen ^^;
    ~dizzy my future, silly my way~
  • fistoftheryustarfistoftheryustar Joined: Posts: 2,170
    Im doing something for the Alternate Costume SRK Community contest. So I dont think its messed up to use the same base and draw different clothes, just as long as you dont do it too much in your main artwork.
    My drawing:
    Mai cheats on Ryu - "Shin Shoryuken!"

    http://forums.shoryuken.com/showpost.php?p=7115525&postcount=252
  • Bob SagatBob Sagat Akuma Thurman Joined: Posts: 1,547
    Lol, dude. There is no code. You should do stuff the way it works best for you.
    Thinking you should be able to redraw a drawing from scratch is just giving yourself an unnecessary handicap, leading to a lot of frustration and self-doubt.

    It's very rare that I can draw a perfect drawing in one go, so if I've got a sketch that looks like it could be good, I put a new piece of paper on top, refine the stuff that's too vague, keep the stuff that works and change what doesn't work. If I think it could still be better, I just do it again, until I'm happy with the drawing.
    Roald Dhalsim
  • Xenozip.Xenozip. what a nincowpoop Joined: Posts: 3,942
    Does anyone know of a video (preferably youtube) of some one creating something like this? (source)

    Like, the pseudo-3/2.5D pixar-esque-looking stuff? I've seen his T.Hawk tutorial but that's a slideshow, was hoping for a video. I've seen similar styles like here and here and here and here etc so I feel like it's not uncommon.
    Let's play.
  • fistoftheryustarfistoftheryustar Joined: Posts: 2,170
    I want to paint with the Okami-style on actual paper or fabric (not in a digital media.) I'm interested in the cool ink splashes. I just can't figure out how they do it.



    Here are some examples from Okami and Street Fighter 4:

    - http://www.blogcdn.com/nintendo.joystiq.com/media/2008/02/okami020608.jpg (Okami) ... Look at background

    - http://sarcasticgamer.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/hakan_SSFiv.jpg (SF4) .... How can I recreate those splashes on paper? Maybe cover a part of the drawing, and splash the ink on the exposed areas

    - http://sarcasticgamer.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/Makoto-Ink.jpg
    http://cdn1.gamepro.com/screens/138421/76281-2-screenshot.jpg .... Lovely Inks Splashes in both these pics



    I would love to get this art form down. If anyone has any ideas or hunches let me know
    My drawing:
    Mai cheats on Ryu - "Shin Shoryuken!"

    http://forums.shoryuken.com/showpost.php?p=7115525&postcount=252
  • fistoftheryustarfistoftheryustar Joined: Posts: 2,170
    I keep finding pictures of fighters already in a cage.

    For school we have to make a movie poster. I want to put a person I know inside a fighters cage. Each photo I see to use as the Cage Background, already has a lot of fence in the foreground. So its hard to put somebody in there.

    Is it possible to get some fence pictures: copy + paste, tilt, and distort it to create a fighting cage from scratch?
    My drawing:
    Mai cheats on Ryu - "Shin Shoryuken!"

    http://forums.shoryuken.com/showpost.php?p=7115525&postcount=252
  • X_SwordX_Sword -+FGs, Art, and Beats+- Joined: Posts: 1,780
    What is the use of "masking" your art in photoshop?
    --TurntheHeadphonesUp--
    Steam:X_Sword
    swxrdz.deviantart.com
  • Xenozip.Xenozip. what a nincowpoop Joined: Posts: 3,942
    What is the use of "masking" your art in photoshop?
    There's quite a few uses for masks, though overall it can be somewhat time consuming. I'll just use an example of a female character with several accessories like jewelery:
    - Masking off the jewelery will allow you to color it without colors bleeding off onto the rest of the picture. This is handy if you want to use a large brush or any effects brushes like blur or smudge or anything that might have colors bleeding outside of where you want them to. The advantage of using a mask as apposed to a layer is you only have to clean it up once, if you ever adjust it again you'd have to clean the layer again but the mask will always stay there.
    - Masking off all the jewelery would allow you to use adjustment layers or blending options without effecting anything but what you intend to adjust. This also includes things like adding gradient overlays or generally anything that you want only to effect the mask.
    - You can modify the mask itself to add/subtract space, the advantage of it being done in masks instead of layers is the mask is always adjustable this way, but you may not have an undo point for the layer you're working on. This includes if you save the project for another day and open the file again, the mask can still be adjusted whereas you've lost your undo points.
    - You can create temporary masks (usually referred to as a quickmask) to work on just certain parts of the artwork at a time, a lot of comic book artists use quickmasks regularly in order to "spray" color onto the area with a large soft brush, but then the color only appears in the selected masked area (I think this is sometimes called cut-and-grad style).

    There are some disadvantages to using masks as well, but generally speaking you can work around them rather easily. When creating a mask I think it's infinitely wiser to try and automate the process as much as possible, and also to paint in what you do want rather than trying to erase what you don't want.

    It isn't entirely necessary to use masks though, but then you also don't "need" to use layers either, but they do give you a certain amount of freedom to do things in different ways. For me, I tend to use a brush that is effected by the colors that are already on the canvas (like a wet brush that absorbs color, or smears/pushes existing color around) and so masking is nice in this regard, because it's effected by the existing colors under the mask. For example if I had red visible, and blue was masked off, I could still paint around the edge of the mask and some of the blue will seep in because even though it's not visible it's still there under the mask and gets effected by the brush.

    The main reason I ever use masks is so that I can go hogwild on a particular area and have only that area effected by what I do, which is particularly handy when the surrounding areas are a completely different color.

    Actually, I'm sure there's probably a number of other uses for masks that I'm forgetting to mention at the moment. But I think the important thing to remember is that it works like in traditional tools, using tape to create masks or stencils, except that with digital tools you have a lot more freedom and options.
    Let's play.
  • shubaccashubacca so many long time Joined: Posts: 329
    When I first learned about masks I was like OMGwtf amazors...but now I find I use them a lot less for paintings. There is a more organic feel about raw application of color on fewer layers. They are definitely useful though in the right places and can increase the efficiency of your work flow, especially when you need to provide multiple versions of one painting.
  • Xenozip.Xenozip. what a nincowpoop Joined: Posts: 3,942
    I agree. I pretty much only use quickmask tool these days, if at all. Though my only beef with masks is that it's time consuming, if I could automatically make a mask in a couple of seconds then I'd probably use them more. It's probably easier in photoshop, come to think of it, I'm sure there's some little tricks you can use to make dynamic selections and then convert that over to a mask.
    Let's play.
  • X_SwordX_Sword -+FGs, Art, and Beats+- Joined: Posts: 1,780
    Any tips on crafting dynamic poses for characters? It seems I draw too many characters that just stand there looking at you lol
    --TurntheHeadphonesUp--
    Steam:X_Sword
    swxrdz.deviantart.com
  • shubaccashubacca so many long time Joined: Posts: 329
    Any tips on crafting dynamic poses for characters? It seems I draw too many characters that just stand there looking at you lol

    Use lines of action to find the general movement of the body. I find that dynamic posing makes great use of the 3 main twist axis in your body...the head, shoulders, and hips. Twist and manipulate them using basic rules of counter action (ie. left hip forward - right shoulder forward during a stride, or bending your spine back the other way when you're off balance) and try to get a hang of a body naturally posing (ie.contrapposto). Act out the pose and make note of where your body is stretching, flexing, twisting, dangling, where your fat folds, etc. What muscles are supporting the primary action? Where's the leverage your body needs to allow that support? Your body is your best learning material here.
  • Xenozip.Xenozip. what a nincowpoop Joined: Posts: 3,942
    I think dynamic poses have to do with flow and perspective. Having a fluid construct (base structure), and looking at the object (person) in terms of three dimensions from different angles. Relevant link THE ART CENTER
    Let's play.
  • X_SwordX_Sword -+FGs, Art, and Beats+- Joined: Posts: 1,780
    What are some of the art practices you guys have on your free time? \\
    --TurntheHeadphonesUp--
    Steam:X_Sword
    swxrdz.deviantart.com
  • theory816theory816 Joined: Posts: 3
    is it possible to add 3d effects to sprites in after affects?
  • X_SwordX_Sword -+FGs, Art, and Beats+- Joined: Posts: 1,780
    how do you usually prepare your lineart for coloring digitally?
    --TurntheHeadphonesUp--
    Steam:X_Sword
    swxrdz.deviantart.com
  • AOS-AOS- C Joined: Posts: 3,269
    how do you usually prepare your lineart for coloring digitally?

    I'm in the process of coloring a character right now... Once I have the lineart done nice an clean on paper, I scan it, and redraw the lines on photoshop. I do this because my scanner doesn't work the way I like it to... After that all the color layers go underneath the linework.
    PSN/Steam: AOS- [Gouken, Ryu]
    Wii U (SSB4): Okrapaeli [Mario, Link]
  • X_SwordX_Sword -+FGs, Art, and Beats+- Joined: Posts: 1,780
    what is a good method to apply textures to your art work? it could be for PhotoShop, Painter, etc.
    --TurntheHeadphonesUp--
    Steam:X_Sword
    swxrdz.deviantart.com
  • TaitoTaito Great Thing Joined: Posts: 7,097
    I generally follow tutorial for texturing. I think it's a better idea to paint and blend the textures in by using a layer mask, instead of laying them flat. Warp transform is also a good idea.

    Masamune Shirow is probably a good artist to look at for texturing.
  • AOS-AOS- C Joined: Posts: 3,269
    When I use textures (rarely though), I put them all on separate layers and play with opacity and blending options. I'm that shallow wit the tools I've given
    PSN/Steam: AOS- [Gouken, Ryu]
    Wii U (SSB4): Okrapaeli [Mario, Link]
  • JnXCJnXC Joined: Posts: 12
    Painter problem...
    I've always used photoshop but every now & then I would go back to painter & just mess around, try to get use to it. With the kind of works I do I only require a few things. blotch colours all over the place, then use the smudge tool to blend one colour to the next whilst making use of layers etc. However in Painter XI... I can't figure out how to get the blending anywhere near what i'm aiming for.

    EXAMPLES
    1.png
    2.png

    The first 2 images are the same piece by Kim Hyung Tae, i've circled the parts which i'm talking about. Sure i can get roughly the same effect on photoshop with just the paintbrush and smudge tool, but I would like to be able to do the same thing in painter and from there using and training with painter.

    I don't Recall the artist of this image but it consist almost entirely of the simple blending/smudged look i'm after.

    NSFW
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v289/JNX25/3.png

    i've searched for hours, youtube, 3dm3, conceptart.org etc and where as I see it in many pieces which states it's done in painter, I assumed finding a tutorial for something so common would be easy... I'm hoping someone could help me or point me to somewhere that I can find the answers.

    Current brush setup consists of a custom tinting brush for laying down colours & a custom smear brush trying to replicate PS's smudge tool but at the same time try to get those sharp and almost natural watercolour blending...bah dunno how to explain.

    thanks
    www.facebook.com/humidgames
  • TaitoTaito Great Thing Joined: Posts: 7,097
    Can you guys describe your workflow? For digital art, mostly.

    I think I take too long to finish a pic. I want to cut my steps down. Here's what I usually do:

    Make a sketch, adding more detail until the sketch becomes the linework.

    When I'm ready to color, I shrink the drawing to 50% resolution. It helps gets the basic color/painting/lighting out of the way.

    I enlarge the colored art, then add an outline (like 'inking' to pencil). Then detail the coloring.

    Everything else is finishing touches, color adjust, texturing, etc.

    What can I do to cut down the time to finish a pic? I don't mind spending extra time for creative reasons, but generally I want to finish my usual pics in a week or so.
  • Xenozip.Xenozip. what a nincowpoop Joined: Posts: 3,942
    Painter problem...
    -snip-
    I don't have a direct answer because I don't use Painter, but.. if it's a tutorial you're looking for to help explain that effect in Painter then you may be able to find it in one of these places:
    Browsing Tutorials on deviantART
    TUTORIALS, TIPS & TRICKS - ConceptArt.org Forums
    Can you guys describe your workflow? For digital art, mostly.
    -snip-

    With your process:
    - I would suggest not resizing anything in the first place. Try using as large a canvas as you can stomach, and then just zoom out a lot when you want to "work on a small canvas" to do the "basics" (zoom is like stepping away from the canvas, also try squinting your eyes to blur your natural vision too).
    - If you use a program that can open the same canvas in another window, I highly recommend you do so. Basically: keep your second window very small and zoomed out a lot while your main window is medium and zoomed to 100% or more. Allow yourself to zoom in/out on the main window, but never zoom the small window, and allow yourself to work directly on both the small and large window. Use the small window to do the "basic" stuff.
    - I would suggest not separating the linework from the ink process, but instead make it the same process. Currently you create line work, then color, then create "line work again". I would suggest working on a sketch and then do a rough, then "ink" over everything on a large canvas as if they were traditional tools. Try to avoid erasing and undoing. Then use a new layer to paint under the line work. With ink (maybe line art in general) I believe in the motto "slow and steady wins the race".
    - If you are in the habit of painting over the inks then it's not really finalized inks, so in that case you can skip the inking process and just work on coloring and inking at the same time. For example, be extra extra loose in the sketch process and remember it's going to get over-written anyway, so it doesn't matter how anything 'actually' looks at that stage. Then, after laying down the basic sketch you could lay down the basic color but avoid completely overwriting the sketch, and then the third and final step would be to add the refined drawing(outline/ink) while shading/detailing the color (I know some one who uses this method regularly to great effect).

    There is a possibility that there's no reason to change your method. In your case you might explore different methods of doing each of your normal procedure steps or just dropping a couple steps altogether by combining them into one step. But I remember a quote, though: "First you get good, then you get fast, then you get good and fast". So, it's possible you're at a point where you just need to focus on quantity over quality, and work as quickly/messily as possible in order to "figure out how" to work fast, then come back to a balance phase.
    For me it depends what I'm doing. I try to use a different method for each piece I do. I feel it's the best way (for me?) to learn, while avoiding getting "stuck" in a particular way of doing things. Especially because I am self-taught, I want to avoid the deathtrap of directly copying another artist's style or the trap of refining only one skill-set. So I always go about doing things as differently as I can every time I do anything. Eventually when I feel things settle in I can refine my skills, and also develop a personal style. But until then I want to explore as much as I can in order to experience all that is possible.

    Every artist that I know of who went in to the professional art world before going to school, then later went back to school, has said that going to school made dramatic improvements on their art despite already being "pros", and the reason is because school forces you to do things differently than you normally would -- a lot of different things -- which you learn a lot from.

    Plus the most important aspect (which is relevant to your question): each time I do things a different way I can evaluate how that method felt and how much time it took and weigh the overall pros/cons. Adding it to my bag-of-tricks collection, keeping the parts that work and ditching what doesn't.

    As far as cutting down time on what you're doing, digital art shouldn't take more time than traditional art IMO. If it does, then consider analyzing why and finding a way to do each step faster on the technical-side of things (even just learning hotkeys for things can make a huge difference). The biggest problem for me was that I treated digital as far too digital. Erasing and undoing were like OCD mashing for me. Huge mistakes of the past. But that's why I keep exploring, I'm still in the process of learning to treat digital more as traditional while keeping the tools that make digital even MORE efficient than traditional (instead of as add-on's/enhancements).
    Let's play.
  • TaitoTaito Great Thing Joined: Posts: 7,097
    Interesting. Using the two panels for the same pic does help me keep an eye on everything. I tried shrinking for precise coloring (it's faster/easier to filling all the pixels with color) but I'll try to do without. Thanks for the advice.
  • CHOWZCHOWZ Joined: Posts: 330
    That was really helpful Xeno, thanks.

    I'm kinda stuck in my current method and its killing me. I've gotten so used to drawing on MS Paint with my tablet, that I can't really get comfortable when it comes to Photoshop for some reason. So far I've been doing my main sketching in Paint with inks and shadows first which I then transfer to Photoshop where I struggle trying to get a clean coloring job. Ending it with a even more desperate attempt to use blur and gradients to make it somewhat presentable. Its hopeless I know. Another problem I have is patience, for most of my life I've been wanting to do great sketches fast and easy. But that can only go so far with coloring, which is something I have to work on. So alot of my stuff looks rushed cause I just want to get the shit over with. Which is a shame since the coloring just kills my overall piece. Another reason why I like working with black and white instead. Man I feel like I just confessed my whole heart out here, but it is what it is. I guess this is just my way of trying to explore in getting good fast. Though I'm far from it.

    Another thing I wanted to ask is the no line technique. Not that i'm trying to bite anybody's style or anything, but its something I've been wanting to try but I just feel my execution is off. That or I'am really not comfortable with the lasso tool. Do I really have to trace every part of the lineart and shades included using lasso? is there another way that someone could explain this to me?

    Scarlet by *lastscionz on deviantART
  • AOS-AOS- C Joined: Posts: 3,269
    IRL, there are no such things as "lines"... these things we call "lines" are really a separation of color.
    What you do is you make colored shapes that will represent whatever it is you're drawing. shadows and highlights will be represented the same way. And i HIGHLY recommend you learn how to use the pen tool as the lasso really sucks ass. make sure in the pen tool options you select "Path" and not "Shape".

    You guys think I should stop here? I was thinking about adding another Trish and Dante (in the same style as my Ibuki 3-tone drawing), at a scale that consumes 60% of the canvas height, but am unsure if that is too much? I chose to have the current pair fairly dark and loose for backdrop entities

    dmcwip.jpg
    PSN/Steam: AOS- [Gouken, Ryu]
    Wii U (SSB4): Okrapaeli [Mario, Link]
  • Xenozip.Xenozip. what a nincowpoop Joined: Posts: 3,942
    -snip-
    That reminds me, I hate to sound like a broken record by mentioning art videos on youtube/nico, but it really is a great way to view other artist's "workflow", as you had inquired about.

    In fact, the previous tip I gave you regarding the separate windows was from a video I saw a while ago:
    -
    -
    -
    - (creating and coloring line art)
    - ??????????????????????? ? ??????(??)
    - ???????????(?????) ? ??????(??) (coloring line art)
    -
    -
    -
    -
    -
    -
    -

    And tutorials are good too:
    - Sunday Mailbag | Tom's MAD Blog!
    - PSG Art tutorial
    I personally found them useful as study guides for myself.
    -snip-
    I wouldn't know exactly how that particular artist does it, but I do know how I would do it (example): you draw a shirt in black lines, you make a new layer and move it below the lines layer, you color the shirt on that new layer, you go back to the original line art layer and "lock the layer transparency", then you switch between eyedropper and brush to just recolor the black lines to match the shirt color.

    So, rather than removing the lines you simply recolor them without having to redraw them. Of course, getting your finished piece to "look right" requires a good concept of values and edges and how light/shadow works.
    -snip-
    I agree. Magic Wand, Quick Mask, and Pen Tool do whatever you would have done with the Laso, except faster and easier and possibly even more accurately than the Laso.
    Let's play.
  • AOS-AOS- C Joined: Posts: 3,269
    When I say lasso, that included Magic Wand...:wgrin: hate that shit too. I use the pen for paths, color fills and any selections that are not non-rectangular selections.
    PSN/Steam: AOS- [Gouken, Ryu]
    Wii U (SSB4): Okrapaeli [Mario, Link]
  • CHOWZCHOWZ Joined: Posts: 330
    Not sure if this has been posted here before, but do you guys have any tips for the coloring process or effect in making a SFIV VS profile?

    http://www.games.lisisoft.com/img/4/9/4988-1-super-street-fighter-4-makoto-vs-ibuki-trailer.jpg

    I think I remember reading in the SF 20 book that IKENO first traced the polygon models and went from there. But I'm curious to know the rest of the process might have been (paints he used for lighting, color consistency and the way they blend). I just really want to get that style down so I can start drawing other people, its been in my head for awhile. I guess I just need to try it out for myself and see what works. Any help would be appreciated.

    Calling out to Xeno, oh wise one, where are you!?
  • Rusty ShacklefordRusty Shackleford Joined: Posts: 18
    For art supplies (Copic) the BEST online site i found is oozak.com

    My local shops don't have Copic items always in stock and they're very overpriced.
    Oozak is the best I found online.
  • akuaku スピリチュアルやからね! Joined: Posts: 3,865
    I'm thinking that Ikeno uses CG to color in those profile images, like Photoshop or whatever. That's what he did for 3S anyway..

    EDIT: Wait, are you asking what he USED, or do you already know that and are asking HOW he did it? I'm slow today. <_>
  • CHOWZCHOWZ Joined: Posts: 330
    Yeah I probably should've been more clear on what I was talking about. I think the main thing I wanted was to have a certain process that would best emulate that style of coloring. I want to try and make the profiles blend in where they match the VS screen avatars as they would exist in an SF IV game if that makes sense.I probably just need the right balance of lighting and hues, so maybe I just need a little trial and error with some color picking from certain sf characters.
  • akuaku スピリチュアルやからね! Joined: Posts: 3,865
    Basically, you use different types of colors and then brush them in layer by layer. It doesn't have to literally be on different layers, but basically you go either brighter or darker with each layer, depending on how you wish to start coloring the shading. It helps a lot to mess with the opacity of the brush you're working it, making for smoother blending. This video is pretty popular around these parts, but it's definitely the easiest to understand coloring/shading tutorial out there so I recommend you check it out. Sorry if you've seen it already though.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hi_3HymnpXE
  • AOS-AOS- C Joined: Posts: 3,269
    Hey guys, without revealing too much of what I'm currently doing, I wanted to get some feedback on this shading part.

    4534q.jpg

    I've circled the shaded portion that's illustrated by hatching. Do you think the size of the hatching is too big? Lines too thick?
    PSN/Steam: AOS- [Gouken, Ryu]
    Wii U (SSB4): Okrapaeli [Mario, Link]
  • -Midnight--Midnight- Roman Canceled Joined: Posts: 174
    I noticed on a friends laptop when I tilt the screen I can see past mistakes in the background of the artwork(digital) that can't be seen to the naked eye. Is there a way to remove it or is this something else?
    Kekeke~
  • TaitoTaito Great Thing Joined: Posts: 7,097
    I just found a full-3D version of Posemaniacs http://charapo3d.web.fc2.com/big_index.html

    You still can't pose the figures yourself, but you can move the camera in any angle instead of just 360 degrees. Much more useful imo, combined with the 3D head/torso/hand/foot viewer on the regular Posemaniacs site.
  • sinixsinix Sinix Design Joined: Posts: 156
  • rookrook amused observer Joined: Posts: 1,633 mod
    That was really helpful Xeno, thanks.

    I'm kinda stuck in my current method and its killing me. I've gotten so used to drawing on MS Paint with my tablet, that I can't really get comfortable when it comes to Photoshop for some reason. So far I've been doing my main sketching in Paint with inks and shadows first which I then transfer to Photoshop where I struggle trying to get a clean coloring job. Ending it with a even more desperate attempt to use blur and gradients to make it somewhat presentable. Its hopeless I know. Another problem I have is patience, for most of my life I've been wanting to do great sketches fast and easy. But that can only go so far with coloring, which is something I have to work on. So alot of my stuff looks rushed cause I just want to get the shit over with. Which is a shame since the coloring just kills my overall piece. Another reason why I like working with black and white instead. Man I feel like I just confessed my whole heart out here, but it is what it is. I guess this is just my way of trying to explore in getting good fast. Though I'm far from it.

    Another thing I wanted to ask is the no line technique. Not that i'm trying to bite anybody's style or anything, but its something I've been wanting to try but I just feel my execution is off. That or I'am really not comfortable with the lasso tool. Do I really have to trace every part of the lineart and shades included using lasso? is there another way that someone could explain this to me?

    Scarlet by *lastscionz on deviantART
    For linework -- there's simply no replacement for being confident about what you're drawing and then committing to it. But if you still struggle with it (like I do), I read a good tip recently: Use the Adjust Levels function in PS to lighten your lineart layer. Then, use the Burn tool and the tablet to go over the lines you want.

    As for patience in coloring -- I think it helps to just do it more often. For myself, I try to keep going around the pic and focusing on getting the shapes and value relationships right... reworking as I go along (through a combination of painting over / using layers and blending options to fix color saturation issues that I tend to have). I let myself work on some detail after I've gone around a bit, but I have to tell myself to go back to the general laying in of colors so as to keep the pic moving.

    Hope this helps. I'm still learning too.
    square peg. round hole. large hammer.
    http://rook-over-here.deviantart.com
  • fistoftheryustarfistoftheryustar Joined: Posts: 2,170
    My friend wants to become an artist. He chooses the typical anime style (and I mean the most generic kind) and he hates the studies and exercises they give him at school. He's hating on "all the sketch marks" and realistic figures he has to draw. I can understand not wanting to do it, since you wanna ultimately become a manga and anime artist. But not realizing that it's 'needed' to have a good foundation, I can't agree with.

    Do you come across people like that sometimes? I personally find the typical generic anime style, well typical by now. One should add their own flare or add something more. I don't think you can go to art school with the dream that " I don't immerse myself in the world of art, and I'll be completely successful as an artist." Am I wrong in that thinking? It just seems too competitive to try to get an easy break.

    If you've met anyone like this, is there a good way to put it into perspective for them?
    My drawing:
    Mai cheats on Ryu - "Shin Shoryuken!"

    http://forums.shoryuken.com/showpost.php?p=7115525&postcount=252
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