2010 New Q&A Getting into the Gaming Industry


#1

Hey just want to bring in a new update since this is a new year. As probably just a few of you know. I was trying to get a job in the gaming industry. Over the past couple of years I’ve been through two schools trying to prepare myself for the field, but it did not turn out well. There was a lot of wasted time and money.

From talking to several people, really a degree doesn’t mean all that much in the field, it seems more like your protfolio gets you the job rather than your degree. I’ve taken this advice and have also emailed a fe game studios and have only received one reply back from one. That reply told me mod levels with the Unreal Engine 3.

I want to try and make 2010 be as smooth as possible . 2009 was a terrible year for me in this respect. I’ve taken the advice and I am currently working on making levels in LBP and UT3. I will eventually get Unity as well. Right now my plan goes on modding and going to school just because I have some free money there waiting for me, although I’m not sure how I will do in school just for that fact, since I’ll be going just to be going.

I’m not that good at programming or at drawing, and I am interested in creating narrative and designing levels.
My first questions here:

Q: In addition to modding in LBP, and UT3, what other software should I try.

Q: For a job as a writer in the gaming industry, what is it that employers look for initially?

Q: There’s always the probablity of job hunting for the gaming field not going as smoothly as planned. What other jobs do you think I should consider? I am interested in anything that involves creative thinking, photography, video production, music.

I don’t see any harm in any other people interested in game design, but not entirely sure how to get into it.


#2

Teacher. In those fields unless you know somebody you are going to have a very hard time. If you want to make good money, killer benefits, and have zero worry about getting and keeping a job then go to school to be a nurse. Right now nurses have got it made, at my hospital and the ones around they are offering huge bonuses to get and keep nurses here. If I could go back and do it over again that is what I would do and not something that bores me to tears.


#3

I’ve been to tons of information sessions and the backgrounds of the reps i talked to seem to have majors that don’t seem to fit with the industry they are in (well in my opinion). Ex. I was in an infosession for a consulting firm that helps big corporations in bankruptcy or other stuff. One guy had a major in engineering and he doesn’t do any type of engineering work. Just the problem solving from his school curriculum is what he uses at work. I talked to a few reps from the FBI and CIA at my schools job fairs and they will hire anyone with a college degree. I guess it’s because different backgrounds gives you different perspectives on certain things. I also went to an infosession hosted by Insomniac Games. I assumed most of developers had degrees in computer science, but a few had degrees in mathematics.


#4

Nursing would bore me to tears. I’m more of an artistic person and it would feel weird for me to be in a field dominated by females.


#5

I like this thread. I’m going the same route but I’m having a few doubts. But yeah, stepping up my portfolio game would be my best bet. I’m looking forward to learning more about making my own crap and then looking at say, the indie game market on Xbox Live. When I get a new computer I’ll look at modding with source.


#6

If we knew how to get jobs that we loved, you think we’d be on HERE all day?!? I come on SRK cuz I’m BORED AS FUCK at work!

NEwayz good luck.

^_-;


#7

If we knew how to get jobs that we loved, you think we’d be on HERE all day?!? I come on SRK cuz I’m BORED AS FUCK at work!

NEwayz good luck.

^_-;


#8

I’ll try to give you some advice.

First pick what you want to do. Do you want to write, be a level designer or a level artist? Nothing will turn off the interviewer more than not getting a clear picture of what you want to do. Out of the 3 level designer might be the easiest unless you’re rather good at level art. On a team of 200 people there’s probably 1 story writter, them’s be small odds of getting the job.

Secondly, take what you can get. If you can get a job as a game tester - take it. Maybe even consider applying as a game tester and state that you have intentions of becoming an LD / Artist / whatever, but be specific.

Lastly, meet people in the industry. This might be a lot easier said than done I know, but most companies put a lot of stock in internal references so it’s worth the effort.

Just personal opinion, but I wouldn’t put too much stock if someone sent me an LBP level he designed. Unreal on the other hand I’d be considerably more interested.

If you have any questions, don’t be shy.


#9

Not all day

artist, no I already said I couldn’t draw. I would love to be a writer more than anything though, but I have feeling that it would be level design that would get me a job.


#10

You don’t need to draw to be a level artist. Go for LD and show intentions of wanting to be a writer.


#11

This is an email that I found on the net from Bethesda. Just wanted to share it with my fella gamers.


#12

Just another tip to anyone looking for some stories about others who got into the industry. In Issue 202 of Game Informer pg.16 Two college students from USC discuss how they got into gaming and got their game recognized by big publisher 2K games.


#13

Hey, I have a question about this. I am applying to be a game tester at a company while I am going to school as a history major. I really enjoy the games this company makes and a friend who works in the company told me that they would be hiring alot of game testers in the near future for a project.

I was wondering, if I wanted to move up in the company without any like programming or artistic skills, is there a dept. or position that has to do with creative design or ideas? Basically the people who come up with ideas for storylines or gameplay mechanics or gimmicks, new content etc. I feel I have a strong point in this area and have already thought of ideas that I think would be great in their current games.


#14

looks like you’re in luck op since literally no person who works at a current game developer knows shit about making a videogame


#15

Subscribing to this thread.

I hope this site helps someone here: http://gamecareerguide.com/


#16

My lecturer gave me those 2 sites on the first week of my game’s design course and they were pretty helpful, plus got me a job at Rockstar North.


#17

[media=youtube]5-X-Ebh1kYA&playnext_from=TL&videos=f8v6xqMZ4lA]YouTube - How To Make A Video Game [Unity3D Basics[/media]

Just wanted to post this here, for anyone wondering how to learn to design a game. I know on unity’s site the basic tutorials are dull and don’t have enough depth to really teach you.

Also don’t forget that PAX is Sept.3-5 this year in Seattle Washington for those of you who are fortunate enough to go. Top game publishers and developers are always there and thus a better opportunity for you to ask questions and present a portfolio to them.
Also to the person above me, can I get more detail about how you got your job at Rockstar? I would like to know the resume, portfolio, and the interview process. Everything.


#18

As someone who used to be in the industry, all wide-eyed thinking it’d be something it isn’t/wasn’t/never will be… these kinds of threads (anywhere) always make me laugh. Then again, I think it might have just been my personal experience.

Oh shit, I think in a few days it’ll have been a year since my “exit” from the industry and I can openly talk about how wack it was!


#19

as somebody taking Network Systems, I honestly have no idea if I could even attempt to apply for any gaming industry jobs :frowning:

but I would love to :slight_smile:


#20

Well I’ll tell you this. Networking is the most important thing ever. At my college, they have connections to apple, microsoft, and a few other software and hardware places. They have dinners where ibm apple and microsoft representatives come to look at the young talent.

I actually have a contact with nintendo at this moment. My history teacher, her brother works for nintendo in japan. Hit me up in a pm and I’ll give you his email or send you a few emails we shared. You never know who has connections. So just ask and talk to as many people as possible. Have a business email, and for god’s sake. Make sure you write phone numbers down. You don’t ever want to lose a number.