A few questions.


#1

Hi, I like Street Fighter from a long date, but never tried to really learn how to play, I never had someone good to play against so… I never really needed to learn, but now I kinda feel like learning to play it, so I have a few questions, I read some guides, but vídeos don’t work with me, I don’t understand spoken english, only written =/ and i’m going to buy the Ultra, then all the questions will be about Ultra, even though I own Arcade Edition on the moment .So I’m going to enumerate the questions:
1 – I’ve been watching matches on the youtube and saw that the players usually do a lot of random (to me) light kicks, punches, etc… Why’s that ?
2 – What I do when the enemy is on the ground, because the tutorials I read all of them say, that when you’re on the ground, you’ll taste hell, but … Well, I get Dragon Punched whenever I crossup someone .
3 – Charge characters, I don’t know how to approach those always crouched defending people, but when I try to play with them, nothing comes, are they really good ?
4 – I read somewhere that Fei Long isn’t good against charge characters, why ?
5 – Tiers, what makes someone high tier or low tier, is Just the matchups ? I read the changes in Ultra and says about -1 frames or +1 frames, this make so much difference, like making Evil Ryu coming from bottom to top tier ?
6 – Can I trust the tiers ? Many of them are so different, like on the sites, or from the tournament players.
7 – I like main characters, anyone, anywhere, all the time, so I sticked with Ryu, but people say that he’s not that good. What tier should I trust and choose a second character to learn how to play ? I think that I like rushdown characters … or I say that I like them because I don’t know how to zoning.


#2

This should go in this forum

http://forums.shoryuken.com/categories/newbie-saikyo-dojo


#3

I’ll do my best to answer your questions, sorry in advance if my writing style is confusing.

Spoiler
  1. The reason for the light attacks can vary. Light attacks are usually the fastest and safest move in many character’s move set so they are good at interrupting or putting pressure. In a more advanced setting the players could be baiting each other in the “footsie” phase (check the glossary and the sonichurricane article).

  2. Starting offense off of a knockdown really is in your favor like those tutorials say, but always keep in mind that most opponents will try to get out of a situation if they can. Dragon punches are great moves to stop your offense but they are risky in nature due to them being unsafe if they miss or are blocked. If they dragon punch you over and over consider waiting for it and punish them hard for trying a risky escape.

  3. Approaching a good defensive opponent is something that takes a lot of experience and understanding of the match up (knowing your options against certain opponents). If you are having trouble with charge motions here is a tip. Using Guile’s Flash Kick as an example, hold the direction, in this case, down for around 2 seconds then press up and a kick button to execute the flash kick. As you improve you will notice that flash kick actually takes less than 2 seconds and you can learn the faster timings.

  4. I don’t know much about Fei Long’s matchups sorry.

  5. Tiers are based of matchups, for example if a character has no bad matches then that character wins or goes even with the majority of the game’s cast, then that is a top tier character. People react to change logs and say things like “E.Ryu is top tier now!” because some of the changes make the match ups more in E.Ryu’s favor (just saying as an example).

  6. Tiers don’t really matter at low level play, but it does give a bit of insight at what makes a good or solid character in their respective games.

  7. You can play almost any character you want. And despite what people say, Ryu is still a good pick, especially for a beginner. Also, don’t force yourself to a style to early like rushdown or zoning, it is good to know when to shift between styles mid match and use that against your opponent.

Well there is my attempt at answering, feel free to ask any more questions, that’s what this section is for. Good luck with learning Street Fighter!


#4

Hi, I like Street Fighter from a long date, but never tried to really learn how to play, I never had someone good to play against so… I never really needed to learn, but now I kinda feel like learning to play it, so I have a few questions, I read some guides, but vídeos don’t work with me, I don’t understand spoken english, only written =/ and i’m going to buy the Ultra, then all the questions will be about Ultra, even though I own Arcade Edition on the moment .So I’m going to enumerate the questions:
1 – I’ve been watching matches on the youtube and saw that the players usually do a lot of random (to me) light kicks, punches, etc… Why’s that ?
2 – What I do when the enemy is on the ground, because the tutorials I read all of them say, that when you’re on the ground, you’ll taste hell, but … Well, I get Dragon Punched whenever I crossup someone .
3 – Charge characters, I don’t know how to approach those always crouched defending people, but when I try to play with them, nothing comes, are they really good ?
4 – I read somewhere that Fei Long isn’t good against charge characters, why ?
5 – Tiers, what makes someone high tier or low tier, is Just the matchups ? I read the changes in Ultra and says about -1 frames or +1 frames, this make so much difference, like making Evil Ryu coming from bottom to top tier ?
6 – Can I trust the tiers ? Many of them are so different, like on the sites, or from the tournament players.
7 – I like main characters, anyone, anywhere, all the time, so I sticked with Ryu, but people say that he’s not that good. What tier should I trust and choose a second character to learn how to play ? I think that I like rushdown characters … or I say that I like them because I don’t know how to zoning.


#5

Haha Don’t worry as long it is written I’ll understand, videos are hard because they talk too fast for me to understand all the words, if there are subtitles i don’t have any problems. So tiers really are all about matchups, about the charge characters, they’re still hard to play haha. The knockdown, still have to figure out a way to make it useful, but I understood better now, and the light attacks, going with your answers, it means that you use them and hold block to wait for the opponent to use a DP or to break a dash attack, thank you, really helped me.


#6

Depends on the situation. Sometimes they do it to get the correct timing for a particular setup after they’ve knocked the opponent down. Some charge characters will do it so that they can maintain charge without moving backwards. And during the neutral game (when both players are on their feet and neither is being comboed) players use it to disguise their attack patterns or to bait responses from twitchy opponents.

In previous versions you could go for cross-up okizeme (attacking while a player is rising off the ground) using certain setups that would make it either very hard or impossible for the opponent to counter. In Ultra, the defender gets an extra defensive option called “Delayed Wake Up” after a hard knockdown (caused by a sweep, throw or some special moves). When a player does a delayed wakeup, you’ll see the word “Technical” appear, meaning that they will rise up slightly later than usual. If you want to use the same cross-up strategy against a knocked-down player, you’ll need to learn your character’s setups, and you need to be able to react to the “Technical” message (or you need to predict correctly when the opponent will use Normal or Delayed wake up). If you’re getting DP’d when you attempt to cross-up, you’re probably not using a good setup against that character, or your timing is not correct. Go to the character sub-forums and ask about their knock-down setups against that character. For grounded okizeme, you can use a meaty attack (attacking so that they rise into the move), or a throw, or you can just move back and forth in front of them in order to try to bait a reversal.

Charge characters are not that good in this game, but several of them have really good matchups. Remember, if someone is just holding crouch-block, they can’t move forward. If you have a life advantage and they are using this strategy, you do not need to attack them. They will need to try to attack you otherwise they will lose.

He has favourable matchup vs Blanka who is also a charge character. The reason charge characters were considered to be his weakness is that he is strong when he is walking forward, but charge characters are strong when they are holding backward. So his strength is sort of neutralized. But this is just the basic idea and it’s not universally true. You’ll need to have a very good understanding of his matchups to understand why he is good or bad vs another character.

The higher the number of winning matchups you have, the higher you will appear in a tier list. Note that a matchup-based tier list doesn’t always tell the whole story. For example, you can have a character that has many favourable matchups, but has one nearly impossible match against another popular character. This character will not appear high on a tournament-viability tier list. Zangief in the original SFIV had many favourable matches, but it was extremely hard for him to beat Sagat who was a very popular character. So even though Zangief ranked “OK” in the tier list, you would never see him win a tournament.

It’s not just the -1f to +1f that makes a character strong/weak. You have to look at the changes made to the other members of the cast as well. But yeah sometimes even minor changes can seal a characters fate. For example if they have a move that is extremely safe to use so that they can just spam it freely and they don’t have other strong tools behind it, then making that move weaker can potentially make them much, much weaker overall.

The top 5 or so characters are almost universally agreed on as being the best in USFIV (Yun, Cammy, Juri, Fei Long, Evil Ryu). The rest are debatable. But tier lists do also change over time as the game develops and/or new techniques and strategies are discovered. The most important thing though is that you just play the characters you like.

Ryu is weaker in USFIV but he is still decent when you compare him to the rest of the cast. As I mentioned before you should just play the characters you like. Play around with the cast, watch some vids. See which ones you find interesting/fun. For starters, try Cammy.