Acouple snes pcb questions


#1

So my buddy bought a snes bundle recently and acouple of sf versions were included. I want to play some sf when I come over and hate playing on pad. I have a hori t6 wireless case laying around ill use with some spare parts. I see several PCB diagrams. Are all the official snes pads good to hack or are there some I should avoid. Also the contacts are black in the diagram will I need to scrape these with an exacto or can I just solder onto them?
Thanks


#2

I’m not sure on the available models, but there might’ve been some different PCBs, especially considering the SNES had at least 2 hardware revisions (the original and the “slim”).

But you’ll definitely need to scrape off any black crap before you can solder anything.


#3

I figured so, think I did it on a psx PCB before, but its been soooo long .

I know there are different pcbs, I’m just curious if there are known ones to avoid for whatever reason. I an always just ask sellers what serial number they are and try to match with known PCB diagrams. Guess ill hit craigslist first. On eBay they are $7-$9 shipped for two

Thanks brah… Lol


#4

I modded a few of these boards and I can help.

The official Nintendo SNES pad PCB is very pad hackable.

Yes you need to scrape the black stuff off first to solder.
I used an xacto knife for scaping the pads.

For the most part all the Official SNES pads are the same, PAL region pads have extra diodes soldered in the R1 and R2 locations as a cheap means of pad lockout
(the PAL console is the only console with electronic region lockouts).
US & Japanese consoles (Normal and Mini Consoles) work with ANY regions controllers while the Pal Consoles needed to be modded (bypassing 2 diodes in the controller port PCB) for US/Japanese controllers to work.

The hardware revisions only cover the Console, the game pads remained the same.


#5

Thanks dark, good to hear from someone who has done afew. Looks straightforward. Just glad any official amer/jap pads I can source will work. Hopefully I can find some for free on my local gaming page


#6

Also, does anyone have any experience with the ps to snes converter? If so, any funky mapping cause I have a six button stick with r1 and r2


#7

You probably thought of this already, so it may be a moot point, but why not just install an MC Cthulhu into the stick instead?
You’ll get the SNES support, plus you get the added bonus of future flexibility either way…


#8

@DEZALB
If you going for multi-system compatibility get a MC Cthulhu like what FreedomGundam suggest

If you are installing a SNES pad or MC Cthulhu into a existing stick I do the following Mapping

SF notation
P1 P2 P3
K1 K2 K3

SNES Notation
X Y L
A B R

Toodle’s SNES button mapping on the Cthulhu


#9

I’m making him this stick on the cheap as a snes dedicated stick and I already have the other stick I wanna use when I go to his place. Don’t want to rewire and mess with everything for a system I will randomly play when I go to his place once to twice a month.


#10

Oh FYI the Japanese version of the controller has too short of a cable.


#11

Thanks for the heads up on that, would’ve sucked haha


#12

If you want to go hard core you can make your own snes controller circuit with two (parallel in / serial out) chips.

If you buy off ebay you’ll most likely end up getting knock off snes pds. Still useable tho.


#13

Oh yes, because the NES and SNES did not used actual encoder chips, instead they used 8-bit shift registers