African Americans


#1

Ok So im kinda pissed even though this does not directly impact my life. It does impact my friends life, but he doesn’t seem to mind, so i guess it’s a moot point. Let me however drop the issue on you guys and see if you think it’s a big deal or not.

My friend Rich is African American. He was born there, as was his mother. His dad is from America and his wife and Rich both have dual citizenship. I don’t think they own land in Africa anymore (they might) but they have family there (grand parents, aunts etc) and visit often.

Every one in rich’s family is white.

We’ve always playfully joked about how he’s a white African American, which he IS and is PROUD to be. He loves his heritage and Africa.

I got upset because he put on multiple scholarships for college that he was “African American”, as he also checks it on boxes that ask such questions. He even Applied for specific “African American” scholarships.

He was denied all. On top of that he was told by 2 colleges that he wasn’t African American. (they didn’t flat out say that as much as danced around the issue, but it was specifically brought up twice)

Meanwhile Trip, another friend of our who is black, yet 4 generations removed from Africa got accepted for 2 different scholarships with worse grades. (Not BAD grades, but not as good as Rich)

So how the HELL is a 4th generation removed BLACK guy more African American than a WHITE guy BORN IN AFRICA??!?!

Like i said this pisses me off as i feel it represents the BULLSHIT hypocrisy in this country. The need to protect groups, and use “soft speech” to hide what they really mean. If schools want BLACK students to feel they are diverse then specify that you want black students.

I told him he should call news stations, and write to papers and perhaps even hire a lawyer, but he feels that it would be sinking down to their level.

Thoughts? Am i wrong to be bothered by this?


#2

Question. What country is African America?


#3

I found this quite funny. Would make a great plot for a movie. Guy contacts news stations with fairer complexion than a viking demanding African American scholarships.

I quit expecting these kind of things making sense a long time ago.


#4

So, does your friend think scholarships for Native Americans are intended for anybody who just happens to have been born in America also?


#5

i haven’t filled out a census/scholarship form in awhile, but most of them said “black (not of hispanic descent)” or “black/african-american” so fuck your friend.


#6

Ironic isn’t it? I find this hilarious too. To answer your question, it’s all about skin color and always has been. It’s a sad reality when heritage is overlooked by the color of your skin… No one can say “Black” anymore because of the whole political-correctness nonsense…

But I think your friend should go public with this as it’s something very controversial.


#7

Is your friend Albino? Or the descendant of Dutch colonials or something?

I have the opposite problem, I’m culturally white but my skin is ambiguously dark (too dark to be white, but too pale to be brown).
Its awful. Minorities keep expecting me to identify with them.


#8

north america has a severe problem when trying to seperate race and nationality
you can be a black german or an asian jamaican (my friends parents who are chinese were born there)
but in the end, it doesnt matter where you are born, its what you look like

race TRUMPS nationality in all cases

which is why african-american is a stupid word
last i checked, jamaica, honduras and haiti werent in africa


#9

Dave Matthews and Charlize Theron are African American.


#10

Isn’t there an ‘‘other’’ box that leaves space for you to specify?

The forms I filled out when applying for Uni was like Black-Afro-Caribbean, Mixed-afro Caribbean, asian… other.


Also it could simply be the case that your friend didn’t have the qualifications, a lot of times I have heard people bitching about how they don’t get this and dad because they’re white. Majority of the time it’s because they simply don’t have the qualifications.


#11

African American refers to ethnicity, not nationality. It’s misleading, but sometimes words are like that. Close thread, this isn’t an issue. Unless playing semantics with words is just that damned enthralling.


#12

:rofl:

Make him call the news stations, or do it on his behalf if you have to. This is too good for everyone else not to see. :rofl:


#13

Your friend is a douche and taking advantage of a technicality. The technicality being that Americans are so bitch made that they try to be PC about every fucking thing. It is much simpler to just say “black”.


#14

I don’t think white people from Africa-- of all places-- really need to have this explained to them.


#15

I will throw a shitstorm now when someone doesnt refer to me as European-Canadian.


#16

Whats the point of African american Scholarships? To help out people singled out because of their ‘race’…they look as a minority and are treated as such. The scholarships are a ‘booster’…if your friend doesn’t ahve to deal with those negatives, then there is no reason he should be accepted for the scholarship, not only would he not ‘deserve it’ from that stand point but think of the smack in the face to the black kids who can’t get a job because their dumb ass mom gave them a horrible ass name?

  • :bluu:

#17

haha


#18

African American means there ethnicity is African but their nationality is American. You got it wrong and that is why it confuses you. Your friend Rich is white but was born in Africa does not mean his ethinicty is African. His dual citzenship gives him two nationailties either American or African.It is his choice as to what he wants to claim. However that does not mean he is African American.