Amateur Hour! part. 2 (SFxT)


#1

[LEFT](Moved from SFxT discussion board here)[/LEFT]
[LEFT] [/LEFT]
[LEFT]I thought this would be a good place for people to ask those questions they are afraid to throw out due to public ridicule (I mean not every gaming community is nice: HoN, DoTA or CoD to name a couple). So I decided I would try and break the ice because like most, i want to elevate my game. So while reading the threads for my two characters of choice(Rolento/King) I am coming across conversations that use terminology I am unfamiliar with and thought I would reach out to my fellow Gamers to help me out![/LEFT]
[LEFT] [/LEFT]
[LEFT]So, since I am immersing myself with SFxT, I desire to be versed in the jargon and understand more of the mechanics of the game before I take my skills to the networked bouts. I am working my way through the trials and getting reacquainted with my Fight Stick and I was wondering if you guys could explain to me or refer elsewhere for the following (I am going to try and be as specific and thorough as possible):[/LEFT]
[LEFT] [/LEFT]
[LEFT]1. Links and Chains:[/LEFT]
[LIST]
[]What are they
[
]How are the different
[]How do you complete a link or a chain (based off of frame data specifically)
[
]How to know when to link vs when to chain (if applicable)
[/LIST]
[LEFT]2. General Questions on Frame Data:[/LEFT]
[LIST]
[]How am I supposed to read it, i.e., Startup / Active / Recovery / On Hit / On Block Cancelable; on the most basic level with no previous knowledge.
[
]How do I apply the figures from the charts to my game, e.g., like slowing the game down(feeling really dumb now…haha) or understanding them in such a way that it translate to training mode?
[/LIST]
[LEFT]3. Block Chains/Stun/Trap[/LEFT]
[LIST]
[]What are they
[/LIST]
[LEFT]4. How do you effectively counter an attack, like the actual premise of it. I dont really understand in SfxT what constitutes a counter, if that makes sense. Moreover, I am interested specifically for King’s crumple stun from Disgraceful Kick and his Shoulder Charge which leads into his Wall Bounce.[/LEFT]
[LEFT] [/LEFT]
[LEFT]5. Mix-ups:[/LEFT]
[LIST]
[
]What is its purpose
[*]Blocking against it
[/LIST]
6. What is a “magic series”, e.g., someone posted, ‘or I go into a magic series’.

[LEFT]I guess that is all for me right now, these are things I think are hurting my game the most (I cant get pasted 1k BP on PSN). Please, other people chime in and drop your own questions about game mechanics, I hope I’m not the only one with some pressing questions about this awesome release.[/LEFT]
[LEFT]Thanks in advance guys! Oh and sorry for the wall of text :)[/LEFT]


#2

Half your questions can be answered by reading through the stickied posts in this forum.


#3
  1. Chain combos can be pressed in rapid succession and do not require tight timing, just executing the correct sequence. The most basic chain is any character lp, mp, hp(this is sometimes referred to as “Magic Series”, which can be ended with another hard attack to automatically land a launcher, and can be any 3(or even 2) ascending power normals in sequence, answering question 6). This chain has some special properties but gives you the basics of what a chain combo is. These are generally not cancellable into a special move after the last hit of the chain(ex cancellable instead) although the tekken character chains may or may not be cancellable because of how strings work, confusing terminology there.

Links on the other hand are 2 attacks that cannot be pressed in rapid succession and still connect (unless those also chain, but thats another discussion). There is a very specific timing required. You must press the attack button between the time when you recover from your last attack, and the time when your next attack will startup and hit before your opponents hit stun wears off. This means ie: if your attack had 6 frames of hit stun, recovers in 2 frames, and your next attack has 3 frame start-up, you have exactly one frame where pressing the next attack results in a hit that actually combos (1 frame link, and not accurate frame data of any specific attack). As long as your last attack is special cancellable, links will still allow you to cancel that last normal into a special. Links tie directly into how frame data can be used.

2)See frame data sticky.

Cancellable means you can cancel the recovery frames of a move with a special attack (or ex, or super, or even sometimes a jump depending on the type specified). Easiest example is Ryu’s crouching mk xx hadoken. This cancels the recovery frames of cr.mk and the hadoken comes out immediately as a combo.

  1. Block chain is a string of attacks that keep your opponent locked into blockstun and unable to act, this can make them nervous, and setup for different mixup games etc. A frame trap can come directly off a blockstring, by stopping the blockstring and pressing an attack that starts up directly after you leave your last recovery while also allowing just enough time for your opponent to press a button(IE they leave blockstun for just 1-2 frames in after your stop attacking, but before your next attack lands). This usually leaves a 2-4 frame window where after they’ve pressed a button your frame trapped normal lands instead of them hitting you. There are other ways frame traps work, this is a good basic start.

  2. A counter attack registers when you hit your opponent during the startup or active frames of one of their attacks. It grants greater hitstun and special properties, ie: crumples.

  3. Mix-up is simply performing an attack that makes your opponent guess or at least make an educated guess about your next move instead of knowing what you’re going to do outright. Common mixups include ambiguous crossup jumping attacks where the opponent has to guess which way to block, attacks that look similar but require different defense (high/low/throw mixup), and many many others. Conditioning an opponent to react to a specific move you’re doing and then changing that to something that lets you punish them with a high damage combo is basically the essence of a mixup, you’re trying to make your opponent guess wrong, make a mistake, and punish that mistake with as much damage as possible.