Any BBQ Nuts here on SRK?


#1

I tried my hand at it tonight and it was a complete failure to be quite honest you. Everything burned, i kept having to scramble for tools though I thought I had what I needed. I can cook pretty damn well but outside on the grill I felt completely out of my cooking element. My mother was over for a visit and wanted BBQ, not coal. I’m pretty embarrassed over it.

Any BBQ Experts here who would be willing to drop some advice on how to use a Grill? lol. It’s only a little Habachi grill.


#2

Don’t cook whilst you have flames, put the meat on when the coal is glowing.

Don’t we have a cooking thread??


#3

Only use propane and propane accessories I tell you what.

We had a failure BBQ today also. Took far too long to get going so by the time it did I had filled up on other food. Still was nice though.


#4

Grilling is all about experience. You have to burn some meat before you get it down right. The real secret to grilling is how you prepare the meat beforehand- that makes all the difference in the world.


#5

i’ve grilled. Never burned it in my life…that’s because i always helped my dad out.


#6

Coal vs propane the great debate. Speaking as a man who takes his cooking seriously, stick with easily controllable propane until you feel confidant with your timing. BTW grilling and bbq is not the same thing, grilling refers to cooking over direct heat like wood, charcoal, or gas usually involving high heat of about 500 degrees which carmelizes the outside of the meat sealing in the juices. BBQ involves using lower heat at about 250 or so cooking for much longer. Larger cuts of meat like ribs, roasts, briskets, fish, or chicken are perfect for bbq because all the tough connective tissue breaks down the same way as when you braise or roast.

Random tips:
-NEVER press down on meat it just pushes the juices out
-ALWAYS defrost/marinate 24 hours before grilling (making sure meat is room temperature)
-having a thermometer is a must
-when grilling it’s usually best to cover to get that smoky flavor but make sure it’s vented so the fire gets enough oxygen to keep going
-use a flame proof water container inside the grill to add humidity to the food so it doesn’t dry out while bbq’ing
-don’t use too many soaked wood chips they significantly lower the heat of the grill and it doesn’t take much to infuse food with the smoky flavor (I suggest using cherry or apple wood for best flavor.)
-herbs (dried or soaked) in the smoker box are great for a little extra flavor
-keep in mind charcoal burns hotter then wood or gas
-if you want rare meat stop cooking when it’s just slightly softer then raw meat, for medium rare it should slowly spring back after touching, for medium well of well done it should feel firm and not give to touch


#7

When you said BBQ, I thought you meant actual shredded BBQ pork. Don’t call anything else BBQ. NC BBQ FTW.


#8

What does smoked BBQ sauce do to the meat?


#9

First (like was said earlier) you were grilling and not doing BBQ. To tired to really go into it, I live in the south and we do a good 14 hour back, brisket, whatever every couple weeks. Fuck propane, messes the taste all up. And learn up on how you want to season it, sauce vs dry rub is a very big thing and has a huge effect on taste/flavor. Where I am at we are a big fans of sauce but a nicely seasoned rub is hard to beat.

EDIT: USE QUALITY MEAT! Don’t go buying your steaks at Wal-Mart. Go to a Whole Foods or even Publix if you can, there is a definite difference in quality.


#10

I couldn’t decide what to BBQ earlier, chicken or ribs. So i did both. Shit was delicious. :smokin:

Fuck propane.


#11

want to come to my BBQ? the one were I put my meat on your grill? Lol jk


#12

^^^^ this. The right marinade, and allowing it to marinade, makes all the difference. When doing steaks, make damn sure you marinade it for DAYS (i do three days, and ALWAYS add a shot of whiskey to the marinade). Stab it up with a fork while still raw first though, before you RUB the marinade in.

NEVER use salt on a steak BEFORE you cook it, it will just dry it out when it does in fact cook.

propane is where it’s at, period. Charcoal and wood chip cooking/smoking/etc isn’t bad, but I find thats more for shit like chicken or pork. Not beef. Even then, I still stand by propane.

first point, agreed. Never press it down, pierce it, etc. All you should be doing is flipping it appropriately (yes there is a proper way to flip and turn steak).

Second point, like I said, I’ve been praised on my steaks. Let them marinate for more than 24 hours in the fridge. Two day minimum, and rub em twice a day (and flip em if you’re using sauce instead of rub).

lol for a rookie. So many better ways to ‘know’.

I was gonna say Apple wood is perhaps my all time favourite.

there is an easy way to tell how ‘done’ your steak is. Touch each finger tip to the ball of your thumb (whatever its called…the meaty part of your palm, where your thumb attaches to the hand, right below the knuckle, on the muscle).

The way the thumb muscle feels to your pinky finger is how rare meat will feel. index finger is well done. Middle finger is mid well, and ring finger is mid rare. I usually aim for those two fingers.

I must also HIGHLY suggest the awesomeness that is BBQ’d vegetables. Cut up some potatoes, toss em in garlic, butter, and herbs, and wrap em in tin foil. Do the same with peppers, tomatoes, onions, mmmmmmmmmmm. Then cook em up.

Couldn’t have said it better myself. I personall prefer a rub. It stays with the meat, whereas a sauce can just kinda run off and pool to the bottom :frowning:

I can’t stress this enough, cut your own steaks. You save money, and you always get better quality. Thank God the Walmart near me doesn’t sell steaks. But your best bet is to buy a tenderloin (sirloin is probably the best type of beef u can get, and tenderloin is from almost the same part of the cow, deeper in fact) or something, and just cut it yourself. If you don’t know how, there are tons of videos and websites online that can help you, and its just SOOOO worth it. You can get a 20-30 dollar tenderloin, and end up cutting like 50 bucks worth of steaks out of it for a fantastic BBQ.

edit: oh, and for the record, I would KILL to try a nice Texas BBQ. I’ve heard such incredible stories. It makes my fucking mouth water to think of how delicious a Louisiana or Texan BBQ could be.

Also, has anybody here ever tried Kobe Beef? My uncle tried it while in Japan, and I’ve heard incredible things about it (fucking massaged and alcoholic cows???)


#13

Fuck…I need to come to America and get me some of this “BBQ” you speak of.

Aussie barbecuing is just grilling. None of these massive tenderloins or two-inch thick monstrosities you call steak; we have to go to a fucking restaurant to get that…


#14

Grilling is really easy and is a required skill for men, IMO.

My tip that I see a lot of people struggle with in the beginning - don’t keep flipping the meat and fighting with it sticking to the grill. If it is stuck to the grill, it isn’t ready to flip yet. Be patient and don’t let it burn, but remember that meat keeps cooking after you pull it off the grill so don’t overcook it on the grill.


#15

This is true. My wife is always trying to get me to grill, but I have a fear of raw meat…so it isn’t happening. I’m certain my life will be much tougher for it.


#16

Yes because it’s better to know the exact temperature of the center of meat without using a device that does exactly that:rofl: If anything someone without a thermometer is the rookie.


#17

thats like asking whats one plus one…


#18

Amen. Coal for life.


#19

I prefer to cook on coal also, but it does take a lot of patience.

As for steak, I like to marinate it for at least 24 hours in a Ziplock bag.


#20

i use coal and wait until the coals turn gray before i put the meat on.

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