Beginner tips on Street Fighter


#1

I just got into street fighter with SSF2HDR and i’m luvin’ it. Anyway I’m playin’ on my PS3 controller right now but i’m gettin’ the SF4 Tourny FightStick. Some guy told me to start off with master Ryu so I have started. I’ve learned the Hydouken, Red Hydouken, Hurricane Kick, and i’m to get down on Shoryuken. After those moves are good with me, I gotta train on gettin’ the Super right and lastly I gotta learn how to execute those moves flawlessly together. Which means every move attempt I make will execute.

Got any other tips?

Another question, does SinglePlayer help me or should I stick to online friendly matches?

Thanks in advance, your apprentice.

P.S. I’m not so sure if this is the right place to post this thread.


#2

4 rules (really basic, but help a lot)

  1. Try you best not to jump in attack “just because.”
  2. Don’t wake up reversal every time you get up.
  3. Don’t use a meaty get-up attack every time you opponent gets up.

Doing actions 1-3, give your opponent many chances to earn free damage off you, if they learn you do any one of them to often.

  1. **Lastly (most importantly), **try to learn you opponents attack style. It will be very hard at first b/c you are learning to play. But in the long run it will help you win many more matches. For example:

Does my opponent (very simplified):

  1. Try to jump in “just because.”
  2. Wake up reversal every time they get up.
  3. Use a meaty get-up attack every time you opponent gets up.

If they do, you can just bait them out and wait for them to fall into their bad behaviors, and counter appropriately.

Wayne Gretzky said:

"A good hockey player plays where the puck is. A great hockey player plays where the puck is going to be. "

Same thing generally applies to SF.

“A good player bases his game on where the opponent is, A great player bases is game on where the opponent will be.” Sounds corny, I know. But there is s a lot of truth to it.


#3

all right…

What about jump kick?


#4

Kriss Kross will make him.


#5

You should definitely learn all your special moves and supers until you’re confident you can pull them out whenever you want. Once you are at that point you want to figure out ways to use these specials to bolster your normal moves into being able to put and keep your oppenant at a disadvantage in spacing. For Ryu, cornering an oppenant and being slightly out of their roundhouse sweep range while laying down fireballs can often time force them to jump at bad times which you can punish. For example, use the forward fierce punch to scoot in and sweep them and then immediatly throw a slow meaty quick punch fireball followed up by another faster fierce punch fireball. If you time the first right they will have to block the second. At that point you can take a very short pause and gauge their reaction. If they jump you can like dragon punch them. If they do nothing you could start the fireball train again and wait again. Maybe you throw a fireball then you dash in and sweep them to keep them off their toes.

Basically you try to create conditions using your specials and normals that force the oppenant to make tough decisions between eating chip damage or forever being stuck where they have very few good attack opptions.

For practice, I suggest practicing basic combos c.mk into fireball for example with ryu. Once you get that, realize that you can c.mk ino hurrican kick, or even dragon punch or super. Once all that is fluid add a jump attack to it and now you’re into the basics of lots of the harder hitting combos of the game. You can do all this in training mode.

The single player arcade version isn’t in my mind a good option at actually training to be good at the game itself. I would couple training practice until you become to frustrated to continue and then going to friendly games until you find someone slightly better or slightly worse than you and just riding that session out as long as you like. Also, in training you can get a great feel for your normal moves and try to create opportunities with them like ryu’s forward +m.p head bonk and forward + fierce to dash then sweep. Learn the zones you are safe and how far you have you can be and still hit them, etc…

If you want, message me and maybe we can play a bit.


#6

It’s always good to practice execution. Once you get your stick, your execution will be something that you will definitely have to work on in the beginning. It’s always good to have your characters specials and super at your disposal BUT…Normals are just as important if not more important. As far as practice goes…find out what your weaknesses are and just work on them. If you have character specific question you should check out their thread. Each character should have their own thread on here with tons of helpful information.

Welcome…good luck…play to win.


#7

nice, thanks guys.


#8

Sirlin’s tutorials.

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#9

Yeah add me man, NYclown


#10

It might sound really obvious but know what the other characters are capable of.Know their weaknesses in relation to Ryu eg hurricane kick goes over Guiles sonic boom and Sagats low tiger.


#11

That^

Check out where their farthest reaching normal is.
Check out what their normal throw range is.

This is all depending on what character you’re playing as since the range you want to play at might be different, but it’s handy to know the reach of the opponent’s normals and throws.


#12

Don’t get hit


#13

i’ve changed my main to Akuma and getting better, thanks a lot guys. Anything else I should know about?


#14

I’ll add you for some practice.


#15

There’s so much to learn ST can be overwhelming to a beginner but the most important thing is to capitalize on your opponents fuckups and everything else should come easier to you the more you play.

Goodluck:tup:


#16

I’ll add that it’s important to learn to block instead of going for reversals all the time.


#17

And if the opponent knows that you’re great at reversals, watch out for baits. The more advanced players will bait you into your reversal move and punish you for it. Ask me how I know :sweat:


#18

heh nothing more rewarding than baiting reversals, i love that. :lovin:


#19

Do learn Raging Demon setups
Do learn to use Raging Demon as an anti-air
Do Dragon Punch opponents after you hurricane kick them

Dont jump around constantly doing air fireballs
Dammit, Fatboy already covered most of the donts… :rofl:


#20

While I might take a little heat for pointing this out…you may want to consider learning someone that doesn’t have so many matchups in his favor. Akuma was banned in Vanilla ST for a reason and HD Remix Akuma, while a little more balanced, is still kinda iffy as far as his tourney validity.

I think that there is a point where the ease of playing a character can dull your skills, keep you from learning other crucial skills, and, most importantly, inflate your view of how good you really are. (Anybody remember the endless floods of Eddy Gordo scrubs in Tekken 3? I still run across people saying they’re “good” with Eddy. They have no clue.) I’d personally recommend Akuma for learning how to set traps and juggling, but beyond that, Ryu (maybe Ken) would be better suited for learning skills that you’ll need when you fight better players if you really want to play a non-charge projectile character.

I personally started out my Street Fighter experience with SF2:World Warrior Ken (basically Ryu in a red gi and blonde hair so, there you go) and then moved to non-projectile throwing SF2:WW Chun Li. So, I think if you want to have a balance of skills, you should learn projectile characters and non-projectile characters to figure out which character suits you best, while also learning how to zone and space your opponents with or without the various tools that the character roster has.

Once you learn how to fight without using the air fireball traps that befuddle most of the Street Fighter cast, then you’ll be able to really take Akuma to the next level.

Basics first, my friend. You’ll benefit more in the end.