Beyond mediocrity?


#1

Now before I get labelled a ‘scrub’ or such, allow me to specify. I have only been playing Third Strike for about two and a half weeks thusfar and, as you all know quite well, 3S is unlike any other Street Fighter (save, obviously, it’s same-series predicessors).

That said, I’ve started basic (read Ryu w/ SAIII) and have all of your standard mechanics down. I know Ryu’s bread & butter combos and bone-basic theory. I know some Denjin setups - although my execution on an arcade cabinet could stand some improvment. Parrying is key, I know, but can only improve with practice (?). Honestly, I’ve read pretty much everything I’ve been able to get my hands on but, beyond Kara-Throws, I’m still finding myself at a bit of a loss.

Could anyone offer me some pointers on how to improve my play beyond mediocrity?

My thinking in asking is that you, the players of the esteemed upper-crust, have seen much more 3S than I have, and (certainly) at a higher level of play, so perhaps you could delve into your experience and voice some of the most common mistakes made by those learning, or illuminate the secret of becoming less predictable without embracing complete randomness.

Basically, I’d just like to hear the thoughts of my betters in 3S.

Thanks.

  • Archer

#2

i dont play him that much but i do know this i think…

SA3 is unblockable and u have to charge it right… do a 360 degree motion while charging on ur stick and it will be fully charged :o or thats what i heard…

and use shin-shoryuken! then one of those kicks hcf+lk i think


#3

to get better you have to download videos, read forums, and most importantly, play. no matter how many videos you watch, you cannot instantly get better. you have a better idea, but execution and thought are two different things. pressure affects execution as well as thought, and only through playing more and more will you get less and less pressure.

as for playing ryu --> he’s not as easy to play. you have to be better than your opponent in order to have a good chance of winning because ryu takes alot of work. play all 4 shotos and get a feel for how ‘shotos’ should be played. dash, foot work, ranging, and bread and butter. the major key in 3S is to alternate to keep the opponent guessing. learn to vary your attacks. timing is also a key.


#4

yeah id agree, just play a lot.

learning your ranges and poke sequences to aggrivate people to get them to do stupid shit. i think you can always improve your basic poke game. supers and stupid combos are easy compared to controlling the pace of a match.

dont over complicate it and you’re fine.

oh, and me personally w/ ryu, i use SA1 for the ex meter, mix it up and keep them in block stun all day, go for throws, overheads etc etc etc…

making fun of people in the corner with ryu is pretty satisfying, belive it or not.


#5

Meter management should be a big part of your gameplan. Learn when to use EX Moves and when to save for supers. EXs are generally easier to land than SAs, but SAs tend to be more effective in the damage dealing department. Using the universal overhead correctly should be on your to do list as well. Technically any character can pull a half decent mixup game using it, not to mention that SAs can be linked off it.

As for Denjin Hadoken:
You need to rushdown the entire round to build pressure on the opponent and meter for yourself. With Denjin, you need to worry about opponents that can parry it. The closer you can get to your opponent, the better. This is consitoring projectiles are easier to parry from far away. Since Denjin is unblockable, you could use it on a standing opponent as an unexpected death blow from close range.

That is all I have to say.


So i modded my first arcade stick a while back
#6

when u throw someone, dash back once or twice, and hit that denjin up and make sure they cant jump when they stand up…


#7

most decent players quick rise.


#8

Thanks guys! I’m commiting your suggestions to memory. Keep 'em coming; all constructive comments are greatly appreciated.

I’m esp. interested in your observations of the kinds of errors that new, mid-range players tend to make.

  • Archer

#9

i know its possible to roll out yea but there are times when ppl actually stay down -_- and i dont say u should only do it then…

and abou the errors they make is… they usually do only one thing over and over, be sure to do overheads too and stuff and link from those shit, im on a DC so overheads dont really work coz comp doesnt duck when rising and makoto EX Oroshi which is an overhead too doesnt work here either, yet i keep doing them, coz they should be part of my technique for when i do play ppl in the arcades…

another mistake i made before is only fight against the strongest in arcade mode… like u can choose from necro and chun and i choose chuin coz shes top tier shit and stuff… but when i did fight necro i lost badly X_x u should learn to fight every character, and if there is noone who plays that char, learn it a bit urself, i learned Elena a bit like this, and now i parry her jumping roundhouse and DP+K like madness and SA3 that shit down with ken and stuff…

i hope u dont mind my gammor :stuck_out_tongue: i always do this when i type, i translate from dutch and then it fucks all up


#10

basic ryu stuff:

stay ground based as much as possible

watch for your opponent to jump and immediately knock him out of the air with jump strong, or jump fierce

if he’s too far, use normal moves as Anti Air (not uppercuts)

example:

jab
if he parries you have several options:
jab again
pause to mess his parry timing, then ex upper
throw
low short x2 super

or use fierce into round house, or cancel to hurricane. be safe with your anti airs!

next: you want to knock your opponent down and stay close to play mixup (high,low, kara throw) games and footsies

ryu has several good pokes to play footsie with:
low forward, stand forward, stand rh, low rh

but know your ranges and mix it up

dl videos of high level play to figure out what they’re trying to do

most players consider super art I the best for ryu

practicing by itself isn’t very useful if you don’t know what you’re missing (other than improving execution)

good luck!


#11

since you’re on the yahoo list you should view the georgia footages. his ryu is too good.

imo the only way to get better is to know what moves are safe (experimentation, watching footages or other players) and play against good competition (look for decent arcades).


#12

i have like 3 matches of Alex Valle’s ryu against chinese competition… he got ownt, he played against tokido too, but this chunli was badass he had to play, she parried one of the ex hadoken and then quickly did super which can travel thru fireballs… everybody was like omg and u kept hearing this lil annoying dude: WOOOOOOOOWWWWWW like a little kid that sees his dream come true, an arcade opens up next to him


#13

they are japanese, not chinese players. and the chun-li is named Ohnuki


#14

its all the same :wink:

and ohnuki, i heard a lil bit about him, he looks like daigo or something? with bleached hair read it in some picturethread


#15

yeah, that was against the japanese in the 5 on 5 at evo last year - evo 2k2. that just shows how much little we knew about the game. all ohnuki did was did one super motion and parrying upon completion of the motion then did another super motion then kick. now pretty much everybody knows it and more.

tokido vs valle wasn’t that bad. but valle vs mester… :eek:


#16

thats one big yun expostion


#17

ryu’s best poke is still ex-fireball.


#18

Ohnuki parried, and then did the super motion.
its not that hard.


#19

yea but if u see that shit for the first time u cabn expect everyone going wow


#20

All decent players should have their execution down. What separates the best players from the rest is the mind games. They’re better at the mental aspect of the game.

That said, you need to go out and play against many different players to figure out what works, what doesn’t, what are your options, etc.

And when you lose, think about why you lost. Think about what he’s doing and why it worked on you. Then try to change your game with a counterstrategy. Always rechallenge someone if you lose.

Example. Maybe you’re losing because he’s more patient/turtling you. Possible solution: outpatience/turtle him back, or rush him down with better mixups.

You need to pay to improve, simple as that. You don’t put down the quarters, you don’t learn.