Building a custom stick?


#1

I think there was a thread on this before but its outdated by about 3 years.

So far through some research I see that every example requires soldering… is there a way to do this without soldering? I have no idea how to solder.

If anyone know of some in-depth tutorial that I could use, it would be much appreciated… thinking of custom building a small box with just 4 30mm Sanwa buttons and a 2 24mm buttons to use for Stepmania/ITG (Rhythm game).

Currently I’m using my TE fightstick with the 4 bottom buttons mapped as the four directional buttons on a keyboard VIA Joy2Key, but it’d be cool if I had a smaller much more portable box specifically made for playing rhythm games :smiley: .


#2

Even if its 3 years out of date the Basics never changed. Arcade parts haven’t really change all that much in the last 10 years or so
Just the game systems that are around.

You need a controller PCB with screw terminals, quick disconnects for the buttons and switches and a joystick wire harness if applicable.

I don’t care about the game, what system you want your controller for?


#3

I almost didn’t recognize you after you changed your avatar o_o.

Toodles MC Cthulu should work, right? I’m going to be using it strictly for the PC.


#4

You can do it without soldering. You would need:

  • PS360+
  • wires with quick disconnects already attached (I think focus attack provides those)
  • JLF (or whatever joystick you plan on using) harness

However, why not just learn to solder? It’s fairly easy for what you’re doing and it’s another skill you can say you have.


#5

I don’t think I can buy the extra equipment at the moment ^_^;; maybe after I’m in university…


#6

Change of plans: The desk I’m using right now is my desk for the next while and I thought this might be good idea.

http://i.imgur.com/F5ow374.jpg

Excuse the crude diagram, but that’s about where the buttons/joystick would go.

The question is, is 1.5 cm (or 3/4 inch?) too thick to fit in the Sanwa 30mm buttons?
I saw a guy upload a video on his, and it seems relatively simple. Just need to drill holes in the table, fit the buttons and mount the JLF, wire the quick disconnects from the buttons to the MC Cthulu PCB and then tape (or some other way to bind them) all the wires to the bottom side of the desk so that the wires aren’t drooping down and shiz.


#7

I’m not so sure if that’s a good idea… If you plan to have other stuff on your desk it’s going to make things rattle.


#8

The desk is a big L-shaped desk, so all of my work and stuff that I do is on the other side… Not much to rattle on the desk anyway, its just papers and my laptop :D.


#9

Seems like it.
Though some people have had luck just sticking snap-ins into deep holes regardless.
According to Slagcoin, snap-ins are generally mounted in approximately 1.5-4mm panels, and whereas the mounting depth screw-ins is usually about 11-13mm.

Note that JLFs should also be mounted about 9mm below the top playing surface to get the recommended 24mm of shaft height to the balltop. So you’d have to do some routing there as well.


#10

Not too keen on that anyway. I mean, there’s an increase risk to the guts if you leave it in the open. And if you want to cover it up, why not just then make a box for it, so at least it’s portable?


#11

I have a stick already, so thought it may be convenient to have one that is just always there at my desk. But the thickness of the wood is just what bothers me… I feel like it’s probably too thick >_>.


#12

its not too thick for the buttons… snap ins will work fine.

Mounting the JLF under it at that depth will put it really really low… you will want to route it to half that depth at least… even then it will be a tad low but tolerable.


#13

If you don’t have the proper tools to solder, something tells me you won’t have the available tools needed to drill out the holes, route the wood underneath to get the proper spacing between the wood and mounting plate or anything else that this job would require. Either invest the $15 in a soldering iron or go the route mentioned earlier for a solder less solution.


#14

they might know someone that has the tools for that… also some people just aren’t interested in soldering…


#15

Its okay ogre, I abandoned this <_> Don’t think I’ll attempt it until later in my life lol


#16

http://youtu.be/znGBU5oODz8