Chunli. High learning curve?

chun-li

#1

I’m constantly losing morale as I keep losing to these random online XBL players that just do random shit. Not only is annoying, but it reduces my urge to play chun. I keep trying to tell myself that it’s a process, but I feel like it shouldn’t be taking this long for me to progress, granted I’m tryin my hardest too.

Anyways, sort of a rant. But what do you guys think. Does chun have a high learning curve?

Delete if necessary.


#2

How long have you been playing SF4? How long have you been playing Li in SSF4?

For me it was more about developing a “rhythm” with the character. Watching videos of Nuki’s and of Nemo’s Chun Li helps too.


#3

I’ve probably played sf4 for like 3/4ths of a year. And I used to play chun back in vanilla for a two or three months. And then I switched to rog, and I was where I am now with him but after a few months I grew out of that ‘scrubby’ play. And I’ve been playing chun in super for a month now.


#4

I would say her difficulty level is medium. She is not as hard as Gen but she isn’t as easy as Bison. Just keep playing and learn every technique you can. It all clicks eventually.

Also, st. MP is awesome!


#5

The biggest thing you need to realize is that you shouldn’t take online play seriously. Use it as a learning tool and try out new things with your character, and see what you can come up with. If you try to take it seriously you’ll find yourself either A.) Getting Bored, or B.) Getting Frustrated.

Chun isn’t super hard to learn, but I’d say you’ll have to spend some time with her to really be able to use her correctly. Learning to use her pokes/footsies is the biggest aspect to her IMO. Timing is everything.


#6

Well as Cobra said, you should use online as a learning tool. For example: Chun has an anti-air for almost every situation, you have to know which ones work. And her usual go to anti-airs of c.mp and s.mk won’t cut it sometimes, so you want to see how the hit box is for CS.mp, cs.hp and such. Don’t be afraid to experiment online,if you play too seriously , you play too safe and you go for the tried and true tactics that you know. The thing is there are go to moves that you may not even know at all without experimenting.


#7

Going through the motions and just spamming moves like flow chart kens doesn’t work with Chun and it never will. For me playing Chun tends to promote the fundamentals of the game more then most characters because she doesn’t have specials that should be used in an abusive manner . I have been a fan of Chun for years going as far back as SF2 and I think the way she is now is how she should be. Every mistake you make is magnified because of how easy it is punish her for them that is how I feel it should be for the other characters as well. If you can’t deal with that on a daily basis then choose a character that can cover their mistakes better with overpowering moves like Ken or Ryu. Being frusterated is fine we all feel that way some times, but if it starts to eat away at you mentally to where you feel like quitting for real then you should try someone else seriously. You shouldn’t feel like winning or losing is everything, it’s nothing everyone wins and losses daily. You should be playing for the love of playing the game and only that, not because of your win or lose record.

Don’t take this as a bad thing it happens to the best of us too me included


#8

She isn’t simple, I guess, but for me she’s clicked on a visceral level like nobody else. Her moves, jumps, etc. all just feel right, and in my opinion, that makes a world of difference. Somebody like Ryu might be easier to understand, but I feel hopelessly awkward trying to control him. (And that’s assuming I can even stay awake for the whole match :rofl: )


#9

A learning tool for what? Offline comp is rare and I for one don’t have access to it :frowning:


#10

Stick with it.

Ive been playing Chun since Super was released (I played Rufus in Vanilla) and I find myself getting beaten badly by people I know I could beat. But I just keep my head up and spend a hell of a lot of time in Training mode.

I know it will eventually pay off.


#11

Basically Online play gets you a good feel for how the character is played. Offline play is always the best option but in my case. I work anywhere from 5 to 6 days a week. The time I have to play any online game that can be played offline is extremely limited. For me online play is all I got time for even though there is an active offline scene in my area. I also find all other characters not Chun Li to be weird and awkward even if I know how to use their moves.


#12

Chun-li execution learning curving, she has one of the easier ones. Because you don’t have to concentrate on your execution as much as you would say a character like Viper or Cammy, it’s a bit easier to play the game and play to your opponent more.

However some of a her matchups are downright frustrating like vs Blanka and Balrog in some cases even though those matchups are in her favor so you have to “think” a bit more with her than other characters. Characters like Sagat and Ryu you sort of play all your matchups the same.

Offline is the best way to practice if you have access to it. You should treat online and offline as two separate beasts. Online lets you learn a lot of your matchups which you can’t play offline.


#13

what im noticing is that chun is better suited for higher level of play than beating online mashers. when you play scrubs like that, a big portion of what makes chun strong cant be used. Sagat players who mash TU dont know what footsies are, and they dont know that wakeup srking isnt agood idea.

online play is often about mashing the most powerful moves, and really chun doesnt do much damage, and she takes a lot.

you have to work harder as a chun li player. she has some matchups that are straight up awful, which i think is a pretty nasty oversight by capcom.


#14

Chun is not harder to learn, she’s just weak until you master her core skillset. You don’t have an easy anti air or any reversal or an easy anything, if you don’t master what to do in those situations you’ll have trouble winning. You won’t suddenly see a huge improvement once you learn to time s.mk anti air the way you would if you learned to anti air with SRK. But it’s still an improvement, so hang in there.


#15

It’s funny you should say that. I was debating with my friend HollowTatsumaki (A Bison User) that Chun Li requires more work than most characters simply because you have to play in a different style depending on the character you’re facing. This isn’t the case for most chars, I used the exact same example using Ryu and Sagat saying how they haven’t got to drastically change their gameplan much from match to match.

I’ve been playing Chun for a good couple months now, I started with Ken in Vanilla and stuck with him for a long time also, but I find that with Chun, because she’s such a versatile character, the learning curve is bound to be high, but this only means that there is alot to learn with her. IMO you can know only 40% of what she is capable of and still be a decent player as everyday, there is something new you can learn with Chun. Whether it’s a new combo/link, shenanigans or even a particular match up tip, Chun Li has alot to her game, so don’t be disheartened. Stick with her, train, use advice given to you and you are sure to be a good Chun player sooner or later

=)


#16

IMO what makes Chun hard to learn:

  • Character-specific strategies.
  • Coming out with the right poke at the right time. This includes AAs that are oftentimes character-specific.
  • Lightning Legs execution. The basic BnB is easy, but it gets more difficult as you go to the more advanced ones (i.e. c.HP to HK.LL).
  • The fact that her only decent reversal option requires meter.
  • Proper U1 usage and execution.

Her links, imo, are one of the easiest in the game. Plus you really won’t be relying on your links too much. Execution-wise she is easy to learn, but the application is difficult.


#17

I think she definitely has a higher learning curve. Being versatile is key with Chun and it’s hard not to get stuck in patterns with your playstyle. I played a months worth of vanilla and played only Viper. Thought I give SF another shot when super came out and I didn’t wanna work as hard so I started with Akuma. Viper was too much work, Akuma was brain dead easy, but Chun is fitting me quite nice. Not Viper hard, but certainly way more challenging than shotos.


#18

Thanks everyone for the encouragement/the advice.

I’m beginning to notice that Chun isn’t very, xbox live scrub friendly. I feel like I can’t beat an xbox live scrub using Chun. But I do notice that when I play better people, I do better with Chun. I guess just a learning process.


#19

One of the reasons I like Chun is that she has so much variety with how she’s played. She has charge, motion, and mash specials. And she has both charge and motion commands for her ultra/super. She can dash ultra and FADC. She helps with learning footsies and having good fundamentals. She has some nice mix-ups and shenanigans. I feel like learning Chun exposes you to a lot more of the SF engine than playing solely as other characters, so a lot of the difficulty in learning how to use her is because of the breadth of strategy required to use her effectively.


#20

This is how I see Chun Li as well. She’s a good character to pick up if you’re a beginner and want to learn a wide variety of the mechanics and fundamentals of Street Fighter. Learning how to use Chun Li means learning how to use motion, charge, and rapid input specials, and the techniques needed to master them, such as motion/charge buffering, piano/slide inputs, and so on. Chun Li’s variety of normal and special moves give her a wide variety of attacks that can introduce a player to the basics of zoning, spacing, and footsies.

Execution-wise, I think Chun Li is probably of medium difficulty, although as a left-hand dominant player, it took me a while to train my right hand to piano all of the different Leg setups.