Combo's are great but... now what?


#1

So I’ve been playing SSFIV for a year now and it’s been really fun to play with friends but I want to get better at the game an take it a bit more seriously so I decided to buy SFxTK last week and I think i’ve really improved but no where near to the standard of people I face online. I’ve learnt a few basic combos but my problem now is how to execute these combo’s in a fight? It’s easy to learn combo’s and moves, it just takes a lot of time and practice but how do I learn when and where to use these techniques? It’s so easy to execute these combos in practice mode on a dummy but as soon as I jump online I find my self being almost perfected before I get a chance to even try the combo let alone execute it perfectly in the heat of the moment. In the end it just seems easier to spam specials and heavys. How do I get better?


#2

Your trying to hard to combo, and completely disregarding the other fundamentals just cause you want combo so badly. Lol
And when you do that… you start running into the opponents normals for no reason, then your at about 30% health before you know it.
And damn a year? You should be bodying kids already. Lol
just keep training in practice mode and learn how to get those combos on the matches against the CPU. Make sure your doing clean inputs and execution while practicing cause perfect practice makes perfect… And above all that is confidence, after that theirs not much else I can tell you dude. How about you footsie(I hate that term sounds homo, but yeah) to death, and when you see a opening or the opponent fuck up sick, big combo punish after.


#3

Thanks for the tips man. Then how do I know when to use these combo’s? How important are they? Yeah you’re right I should be but instead of playing againts people online i’ve been playing against the CPU. I’m starting to think that’s what the problem is maybe i’m spending too much time in training and against the CPU maybe I need more experience against people? Playing against the CPU is nothing like playing online I can take out CPU or hardest most of the time but I can’t beat most people online.That’s what people keep telling me ‘practice makes perfect.’ what good is practice if I can’t use what I learnt right?

Is there like a guide to footsies somewhere?


#4

http://sonichurricane.com/?page_id=1702

the definitive footsies handbook. id also recommend seths domination 101 essays you can get to all the articles straight from the main forum page


#5

Thanks i’ll check it out


#6

Playing footsies and zoning correctly is what you need to practice first. Personally though, I think picking your character and learning all his normals and which normals are good and beat other things should come first. What can be used as a effective zoning tool and your characters anti-airs. After getting that stuff down you learn combos and practice execution. While learning those things you practice setups as well. Setups in the corner, setups midscreen, hard knocks and the list goes on. Learning option selects and learning which of your characters moves beats other moves and the options your character has against another characters moves. Learning your character bad matchups and good matchups and practice them accordingly. If you can’t find a local fighting game scene I guess your off to the wonderful world of online play (please, I’m being sarcastic here about the wonderful online play if you’re think I’m being serious). Execution is so important and I think that’s more important than anything. Getting that hit and executing off of it is what I’m getting at. Start deciding to go to tournaments in the future if you start getting serious about it too.


#7

Wait what? You want to get better at a game so you buy a different game? Good luck bro.


#8

I live in the UK so there aren’t many places I can play locally and I can’t travel far. So yeah online is my only option. How do I zone against really aggressive players?


#9

I meant Street Fighter in general.


#10

Everyone has a gameplan that theotically evolves as the match progresses. If the gameplan is to maintain steady pressure you can zone them by keeping them outside of their optimal range so they can’t use their pressure tools effectively.

So to do this do you simply walk backwards? You can. But eventually you’ll hit the corner, and that’s where pressure characters really shine, you would be doing their work for them. So you use logic here. You throw a fireball, and watch what they do. They jumped over it? Great, dragon punch them. But, that is the oldest set up in the book and most players are keen to it. So you start to notice that this player is focus forward dashing through EVERY fireball, so you’re getting put closer and closer to the corner. Here’s where the principle of risk vs reward comes in. You analyze the risk of an action, vs the reward potential it has, since you know this players gameplan and reactions its an easy decision. You decide to go for it. You step closer to your opponent, but still at safe fireball range, hardly noticeable that you’re actually an inch closer than usual. Fireball comes out, he focus dashes (like you knew he would) so you’re ready, and BAM, combo time, let your muscle memory take over from there. Meanwhile thinking of your next set up, weighing their wakeup options, and once again analyzing risk vs reward for your next action.

This is just an over simplified explanation, but these are fundamentals. Try to remember, you’re not playing against a character, you’re playing a person. Try to determine what they are thinking, and look at their reactions (a lot of players have obvious bad habits). Practice that execution until its second nature, learn how to set up your combos by analyzing a players patterns and gameplan, then go to work blowing them up with their mistakes.


#11

Playing sfxt is a bad way of learning street fighter. AA are overall bad in that game and the entire wakeup/okizeme aspect is nearly nonexistent in comparison to other SFs. If anything playing sfxt will make you worse at sf4.


#12

yeah i cant combo worth a shit but i find i still somewhat have a chance online. i just hate to work harder :slight_smile:


#13

In a game like Street Fighter, you can always benefit from a combo by punishing something unsafe that your opponent does. For example, if they whiff a Shoryuken, you might as well be in training mode since you’re free to combo. Also work on what options you have when you get a knock down. The more you play, it’ll become natural to punish people for their mistakes.


#14

I pulled off some decent punish combos today (against cpu but level up is level up) as Akuma on 3soe. Took me a few days in training mode to learn some of the SA cancels but it starts to feel natural relatively quickly. Basically the more familiar you are with your combos the quicker you react with them.

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#15

You are already becoming a better player by that regard. The more you play certain matchups you’ll already know what situations to look for. From that, you’ll become a better player.


#16

I got over a huge execution block this weekend. I switched my grip on the stick to have more control and quicker dashing. Took me a little bit to get used to it but now I grip it naturally. Much, much quicker. Now I need to find a way to cheese Gill.

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