Community: How did you initially approach UMVC3?


#1

Background: Ive decided to try to learn marvel (again) recently and i even managed to find a venue to play at. Although its an hour away the setup is pretty decent and the players are friendly (for the most part). I played my first couple of hours of matches and surprisingly it was pretty enjoyable. The players weren’t way above my level (which is a scrub) but they clearly had better combos and more time with the game. I won about half the matches i played…

Then i got put on stream and had a random FT5 against a very good player who pretty much just gave me a bunch of blockstrings, mixups, and setups that i am not familiar with, and proceeded to TAC infinite me to death after telling me he’s a scrub too. So obviously i got 5-0’d lol but it was still fun, especially seeing the infinites in person for the first time.

Afterwards i was asked why i played on stream even though im terrible, and i replied that it was just a random request, i didnt see the stream setup until after i plugged my stick in. Pretty much the guy told me that i was wasting my time if i expected to improve by just showing up and playing. When i asked him how should i be practicing, he told me that i pretty much missed the window of opportunity to learn the game and that i was too far behind to pick it up. So i ask, “so i should just quit?” and he replies “Its that, or you spend about half a year in training mode and on the internet borrowing learned concepts.”

So my question is, when you decided to play UMVC3, how did you approach learning the game? Were you a late like i was? Were you already good at fighting games?


#2

Obviously you’re gonna need to hit training mode to optimize your combos. Then you should be practicing stuff like incoming mixups, movement, etc. The guy that told you that you are too late is an idiot. I picked up this game super late too. Although I don’t think it’s a very good game, it is undeniable that the game is fun to watch and play. Even just messing around in training mode is fun with this game. If you have a good scene that you can play with at least once a week, you’ll see improvement over time. If the player that 5-0’s you doesn’t wanna play against you because he thinks you suck, he is an idiot.


#3

Lol who does this guy think he is? That’s some shitty advice and that dude sounds like a shitty person.

Keep going to that venue to play matches. Real matches against real players is valuable no matter where a game is in its lifespan. Also, like STANG suggested, watch matches and pick up stuff to grind in training mode.


#4

Ok thanks lol. And a side question, wtf is with people not showering and going to arcades? The firsr thing I noticed was a powerful stench of ass and one of the players said its a common thing?


#5

Lololol.

Most you can do is shower yourself and not contribute to it. And maybe politely encourage others to do the same.


#6

This isn’t Marvel 2 so you can still get in and do fairly well with a strong team and some solid practice. The game is definitely not at a point yet where it’s too late to do well. There’s a lot of average players still doing work in this game and high mid level players still making it work. The game is complicated yet ridiculously simple at the same time and if you learn teams that are good at simplifying the game you can go from there (essentially perfect your teams’ structure for killing before you are killed).

There are certain characters and teams that require more work than others, but there are definitely also characters and teams that you can make work without a ton of effort. If they fit your play style you could easily pick up Vergil/Wesker/Strider or Wolverine/Doom/Vergil and start to do well in this game with just months of practice (and a good mentor/practice buddy). Anyone telling you different is overhyping the difficulty of the game.


#7

It’s so much easier now to improve faster. You have youtube to view tech/combo videos as well as match videos. social media can be used to easily talk to players from across the world. The community itself has more players. Easily access frame data with internet and brady games bible. Even online play can provide limited matchup experience.


#8

I think this is debatable but I agree mostly with what you’re saying. This vast access to information on fighting games is one of main reasons people have trouble picking up the games. They don’t know where to start/what to pay attention to. I feel like the core of learning the game is through real live matches. I just wish the level of competition wasn’t so ridiculous. There aren’t enough new players trying to learn this so I feel pretty alone lol.


#9

I came in with a positive opinion of people in general.
I remain here without that. Still can be fixed though.


#10

Work smarter, not harder. The guy who talked to you is a complete fucking loser, where do you go for locals? I want to go and trip him and pretend it was an accident