Conductive Wire Glue-No More Soldering?


#1

Thought this was interesting and that I should share it with the modders out there.
http://www.thinkgeek.com/gadgets/tools/b70c/?cpg=cj

http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/m275/jogi21/random/ConductiveWireGlue_DC41/wireglue.jpg

http://i41.tinypic.com/331zr6r.jpg

Carbon is one of our favorite elements. It makes diamonds, it makes all known life possible, and it makes pencils (and who doesn’t love pencils?) Also, it seems that carbon fullerenes (buckeyballs, nanotubes, etc) are going to do a lot in our future. Time to bring a little of that microcarbon goodness into your home and make it work for you now. “Wire Glue” Conductive Glue uses microcarbon technology to make a glue that also conducts electricity.

That’s right - no need for solder anymore; now you have Wire Glue! It acts like a glue, it acts like a wire, it tastes like . . . just kidding - don’t eat it, and it’s stupendously-awesome-incredible. Put simply, it sticks bits together and allows electricity to flow between them. Wire Glue is great for repairing wires, gluing together electronic kits, and really, is a great safe (i.e. no heat) way of introducing children to electrical engineering. Get some now, and get in on the microcarbon revolution early.

“Wire Glue” Conductive Glue

* Using the latest advances in microcarbon technology, this glue actually conducts electricity.
* Lead free.
* For both AC and DC low voltage circuits.
* Dries overnight to a super strong hold.
* Each jar contains 0.3 oz. fl. of Wire Glue

I’m gonna try it out on my FS3 mod and see if it works.


#2

I’d just like to see if its a quick and easy alternative to soldering? I’m not gonna use it for the whole project, just a few places to see if it works just as good as soldering.


#3

Sounds really cool but can you remove it like you can solder? :wink: Also it takes overnight to dry, not exactly convenient :sad:


#4

meh… I would prefare to work with solder than glue. I guess it would be handy for those who don’t own a soldering iron and want to save a few bucks though.


#5

I have it. It’s not an alternative. Structurally it’s very weak and the exact amount of conductivity is debatable. I don’t recommend it.


#6

Wow thanx for saving me a lil bit of time then I was gonna guinea pig it and try it out.


#7

Darn, 09’ers really are something else.


#8

Shit sounds like the messiah. Welcome to electrically conductive epoxy.


#9

ill stick to my soldering iron lol


#10

Oh good thing I saw this post. Was almost going to pick up some


#11

does this thing really suck? would have been a great thing to use for PTP audio DIY. oh well. :frowning:


#12

Yeah, damn those 09’ers posting a thread worthy topic in a tech forum possibly interested in its subject matter. They really should be poking and making snarky, antagonistic comments like yourself instead. You being a model example and all. :rolleyes:

A pity the integrity of this stuff is off. Would have made an interesting substitute if it bonded better. Not having to deal with the heat of soldering would have been nice in situations where something could melt or fuse incorrectly. Less chance of making a horrid mistake. Though anyone planning on actually doing a project that normally would require soldering would probably not be scared of doing it the right way overall.


#13

come on gaiz


#14

sounds pretty cool, and could be useful in certain situations…but it doesn’t take me all night to solder a PCB >.<


#15

Speaking of soldering, could anyone reccomend a reasonably priced soldering station? Weller has one for about 45-60 dollars on amazon (for hobbyists,) and I was wondering if that will give enough wattage/heat for the soldering commonly being done on pcbs. I haven’t soldered since high school


#16

Damnit noobs just get a good iron (no radio shack 15watt iron!). Get a nice craftsman iron. Get a weller if you have the money.

Get AT LEAST a 30 watt. Get GOOD FLUX and LEADED solder. Dip your metal in the flux and apply solder to your clean iron tip and walla! Soldering made easy.


#17

Use leadless rosin core solder, its safer and you don’t need to use rosin.

Use a damp sponge to clean your tip.

A basic soldering set up will run you about 30 bucks (15 watt iron, solder a new tip) at radio shack.

They are made of cheap material though so be careful.

Although I almost posted that a 15 watt iron is safer for boards, it really depends.

but 30-40 watts is safer if you aren’t new.

If you are looking for a pricier iron, make sure it’s thermally regulated.
http://www.hakko.com/english/index.html


#18

Damnit noobs just get a good iron (no radio shack 15watt iron!). Get a nice craftsman iron. Get a weller if you have the money.

Get AT LEAST a 30 watt. Get GOOD FLUX and LEADED solder. Dip your metal in the flux and apply solder to your clean iron tip and walla!

Lead ftw. Radio shack 15watt irons ftl. I use a weller iron that will go over 100 watts. I use 60 watts regularly.


#19

btw the picture shows someone lighting a led with that crap glue. I think a potato has enough continuity to light a led.


#20

Wait what? Did you read what I posted?

If it’s in regards to lead vs lead free solder, all I have to say is I’ve never had a single issue with lead free or lead based solder, but I did feel nauseous and had a headache from using lead based.