CPU as a valid opponent to train against?


#1

Lately I have been wondering why my combos/chains just aren’t coming out when I want them to because I’ve been using training mode as suggested but something ain’t right. In training mode you can practice to your hearts content but it just doesn’t seem like the practice I’m doing is being reflected when I’m versing a human.

When I started playing xbox live ( or taking the odd trip to the arcades) I stopped using arcade or challenge mode but now I’m thinking that even though the AI just gets ends up becoming way to predictable it might be still a valid opponent to verse in terms of training because you’re versing an opponent in match settings so you’re playing against them in the same context as you would a human. To be more specific, I’m talking about practicing moves/combos against the CPU to increase the chance of pulling of moves successfully while versing a human, not developing strategy. Against a CPU you just can’t throw out chains whenever you want to unlike in training mode, therefore you have a time limit, life bar, ex/super limit, ultra limit and pressure from your opponent.

I can’t remember this being mentioned in the post on the front page of SRK (the huge one about strategy and what not, only that training mode was great for correcting errors. So what are your comments on this form of training? Do you think it could work?


#2

twitch

Anyway, if you need to work on landing combos in a match … then work on landing combos in a match. If online is your only option then get in some 5-bar games and focus on combo execution. IMO. Playing against the CPU is not a realistic bar for any kind of training. CPU does stupid stuff with inhuman reactions, and often falls into very obvious patterns.


#3

?

Yeah thats just the thing, 5-bar matches dont come across all the time. This is sort of a last resort approach to training without another person.


#4

it shouldn’t really hurt him practicing his combo’s against cpu. just leave fight req on and kick all the bad connections. this way your practicing your combo’s in matches but your keeping them warmed up against a punching dummy basically.

just so long as your not trying to beat the cpu with patters etc and only trying to practice execution. everything else sucks against the cpu.


#5

Never use the CPU to train. NEVER. Playing the CPU is horrible. You can’t really use footsies or proper spacing at all. Playing the CPU like you would a player, the game “punishes” you for it. You are pretty much put in a position to win with specials. Take Fei Long for instance… he’ll rekka everything you do. You can win on just DPing all the time. Shit, they eat wake up DP’s, wake up Ultras. The also do the same stupid strat. Gief does Green hand on wake up. Cammy opens the match with Spiral Arrow, Bison opens with the slide. The CPU plays so stupidly you fare easy no problem by just using specials.

Some opponets like Viper and Chun will let you use your pokes but characters like Cammy, who counters with Spiral Arrow, won’t. There is nothing to gain but a cheap laugh from the CPU. They even do wake up Ultras. Sagat will always eat Akuma’s 3 hit FB no matter what. Hell, he may not even block it period.

tl;dr
The CPU is stupid and does stupid things that you can beat with specials alone. They teach you nothing.


#6

This is exactly what I thinking. Im talking about combos against cpu, period.

So that is 1 yes and two nos. But I think a couple don’t quite understand what I’m talking about.


#7

To beat AI Abel… simply walk backwards, and throw. Over and over again.


#8

You want to practice? Go to training and put block on random. That’ll help you more than the CPU. Seriously,that will help you.


#9

But the advantage of using CPU for combo training is that you get a bit more “pressure”. Because practicing combos on non-moving dummies might not always help when you start a real match, and the heat is on.
Just don’t try to learn anything else, treat the CPU as pure combo practice. Don’t even care about winning the matches, just about blocking and hitting the combo.


#10

I “train” on the CPU during fight request. I just keep doing my bnb on it over and over again or practice other execution related stuff on the CPU. My mindset isn’t I need to beat the CPU, I’m just practicing my combos. I see no harm in that, especially while waiting for a match. It’s really been helping me a lot to land my harder links consistently. It’s just another type of training dummy but with limited health and a timer.

And yes, I do believe some of the previous posts, the people don’t understand what the OP is saying. They probably read CPU and immediately went to post how CPU sucks without reading the rest of the post.


#11

To crapface and Yin.

Cool, you’ve seen results. Just what I wanted to hear.


#12

yes.


#13

How I practise combos with “pressure” is record ryu mashing DPs and then continuously punish them. Do one combo ten times in a row, the the next one ten times and so on…


#14

I’ll ask a question.
How many Guile/Blanka/Chun Li players do you find on line that do nothing but constantly focus (I’ve had one or two, but not to CPU degree of once you’ve been crumpled, they’ll keep hitting you with lv.1s.)

Once you can answer that, you’ll probably get your answer :slight_smile:

PS. No, the computer is a shit opponent, it can read inputs and will do it.


#15

Frankly, it’s not that useful. It’s better than the average ryutard since they’re just as braindead but with the added benefit of lag, but it’s only useful if you don’t put any real thought into it.

Basically, the thing about trainingmode is that it allows you to practice the exact same thing. What you want other people for is the matchup experience, which the CPU is marginally useful for; thanks to the weird, whiffy hotboxes, it’s just to find out crap like Honda’s nj.fp is really strong. If the CPU ever does that. I dunno. You really might as well just find stuff you don’t know how to deal with and set the trainingmode dummy to do that, because it’s never really going to help you practice the setups you’d see from a real player.

I usually just practice blockstrings and links inbetween matches whenever i have request mode on.

shooryuken


#16

Yeah you’ve got a valid point there. Its training in the wrong and right context at the same time. Though i have been trying out things like what works against blanka when hes just lept up into the air for his ultra and other such things. Training dummy is very useful in that instance.


#17

Uryo practices his combos against the AI.

[media=youtube]hqROvqx_Urc#t=2m25s[/media]


#18

If you listen to Justin Wong’s interview on gooteck’s website, he says computers are fine for practicing combos on too. Once again, more replies that missed the point of this post completely… When you record the training dummy to do stuff, it plays back exactly what you recorded so you get into a rhythm and you know what is coming next. When you practice your combos against the CPU, there is still a randomness factor as to what it’s going to do. Not THAT random but still somewhat. But then again, I don’t really practice for “pressure” when playing against the CPU either because I know I’ll still always win. It’s just another way to practice for your execution people! I practice my stuff in training mode too. But when I have fight request on, practicing my combos on the CPU keeps me warmed up on my execution. It’s still good practice.

I’d love to see how many more posts come up on how the CPU sucks and is a bad opponent and completely miss the point of this entire thread.


#19

You can also you just put the training dummy on the highest difficulty setting and keep fighting it out, that’s a nice way to learn how to punish and time your execution with that little extra feel of pressure.


#20

I agree that the computer is fine for learning SOME things. Combos, obviously, but also things like move priorities, poke ranges (your own pokes that is, the CPU won’t poke properly for shit), etc.

As long as your aren’t developing strategies, you’re fine against the CPU and a hell of a lot more interesting than something static or recorded (not that standard training mode doesn’t have it’s advantages). If you are practicing combos, just keep an eye on the combo counter to confirm they are really combos as the CPU will let you get away with all kinds of stuff a human wouldn’t/shouldn’t.