Cult Classic Console Gaming Thread


#1

This thread is for discussion about gaming on all consoles not put out by Sony, Microsoft, Nintendo, or Sega (sorry NES and Dreamcast).

3D0, CD-i, Atari 5200, Vectrex, game.com, and all the like are welcome.

I’m currently on a Turbografx-16/Duo kick. I love hu-cards…why didnt anyone else ever use this format? Sometimes (a lot of the time) I like the Duo game performance more than Genesis/Snes. I always remember being jealous of the rich elementary school kids who owned Turbo Expresses. I would have settled for a Lynx.

I was flirting with picking up a Colecovision a while ago. As I get older I appreciate more and more games I can just pop in and play. Also not sure Burger Time has ever been topped.

The worst game on a cult classic system I probably own is Highlander for the Jaguar CD. I love Highlander, and I love crappy polygon games, but Jag CD Highlander is unplayable.

Anyone else still play any crazy lost systems?


#2

It’s probably a good idea to exclude SNK as well (or maybe not, NG AES collectors are hardcore)


#3

If you actually owned the systems back in the day (the home mvs or cd systems) its cool. KOF 96 on cd at home was amazing, even if you could make lunch during the load time between matches


#4

Who the hell could afford them? Six hundred dollars, and back in 1993 when the US dollar was actually worth something, was way too rich for my blood.

Some obscure consoles and handhelds that caught my attention, if only briefly:

Intellivision: The console responsible for a great many advances in the video game industry. This system always seemed to have the best original ideas before anyone else, and enjoyed a brief renaissance in the late 1980s. Too bad about those awful, awful controllers, though.

Astrocade: A game system with arcade hardware, before the Naomi? You’d better believe it! Thanks to its coin-op heritage, the Astrocade had the best ports of Midway arcade games like Space Zap and Wizard of Wor. The pistol grip joysticks that doubled as paddles were way awesome too.

Atari 7800: Kind of chumpy next to the more advanced and better supported NES. Atari fans tend to be rather delusional about this machine, and will swear on a stack of Combat cartridges that its games were better than the ones on the NES… even though its version of Galaga is stiffly animated and crashes after the tenth stage.

3DO: The first timid step into the world of multimedia gaming, the 3DO was quite powerful for its time. Unfortunately, that time was 1993. Two years later, it looked old and tired next to the more powerful Saturn and Playstation. An obscenely high price tag (look out Playstation 3!) didn’t help its chances much in an already crowded marketplace.

Gizmondo: I actually had one of these for about a year. It’s actually not a bad machine at all… it just had really rotten parents. If Microsoft had released this instead of a bunch of money laundering Swedish thugs, it might be on store shelves today. It’s got powerful hardware (although that power was badly mismanaged by the crappy software library) and the rubberized shell feels marvelous in your hands.


#5

The ones that I play right now are my Neo systems. I have had all 4 systems put out (MVS, AES, CD, Pocket) but got rid of the AES. Just to much money to keep up with homecarts when the MVS carts are so much cheaper. I play my NeoCD constantly though, gotta love the soundtracks to games like KoF '96, Last Blade, Metal Slug, etc.


#6

I remember back in 93, my mom’s coworker had a Neo AES I believe and was playing SamSho on it. My jaw nearly hit the floor in awe, especially back then when we were talking about a six hundred dollar console…not including the games, which were the price of a then-modern console themselves…


#7

i still play my duo all the time

gate of thunder\lords of thunder and y’s books 1 and 2 are god like


#8

ColecoVision was pretty awesome when I was a kid… A kid down the street had it, and we played the shit out of it every day.


#9

Anyone else ever messed around with a Commodore 64 or a Spectrum? Seeing as they were some of the first “personal computers,” I’m not sure if it would count as being ‘classic gaming,’ per se. I recall playing Chuckie Egg on the Spectrum (awesome sauce). In regards to the Commodore 64, a lot of games that came out on the Atari 2600 came out on it. The only game I can think of that was on the Commodore 64 that wasn’t out on the Atari (off hand), was “Alter Ego.” It was a game where you basically lived another life (pre-Sims/simulation games). There was a male and female version.


#10

I never knew anyone who owned a 3D0. It had a bunch of crappy fmv games, some learning games, and a few exclusives I always wanted to try. Gex was the big one back in the day, although eventually it went cross platform. Also Road Rash was supposed to be good on it. I remember this rpg that EGM reviewed near the end of its run called Lucien’s Quest (i think). Seemed interesting. Not sure if there are many exclusive games still to make collecting this system now worth it.

Yeah Lords of Thunder is one of my favorites, I like it much better than Gate. I have Ys I-III but never got around to playing them (yet). I saw there was a remake for DS…is it that different?

We owned a commodore64 when I was a kid. It was just a really fat keyboard (with a slot for cartridges in the back) and an optional printer. It was kinda like a computer that you used your tv for a monitor for. When you turned on the c64 it immediately went into a crappy word program. The only game I remember for it was a learning one called Math Rabbit. I was happy when we got the Atari 2600…


#11

the PC-FX used hucards

it was developed by hudson soft so i guess they just use it in their consoles


#12

That reminds me of my spoiled friend and his lil brothers. They had every system. I was glad to just be able to come over to play, but these ungrateful bastards just could not take care of their shit. Sega CD games scratched beyond playability. Game Gear screen broken. Neo Geo controllers and cartridges broken. I’m like damn, at least let me get a chance to play before you tear your shit up, please…

We all laughed at the kid with one the turbo graphix 16, as we traded SNES and genesis cartridges.


#13

lol do those tiger handhelds count?!


#14

BBC Micro B owner here (well my parents were).

Elite was as awesome as the legends say. Took a lifetime to load off of cassette (lol at anyone ever moaning about modern load times) and you couldnt save your games if you switched off the computer. Left it on for 3 days solid once and made it to ‘Deadly’

On a mates Amiga (I think) and playing the original Leisure Suit Larry, you would have to answer a load of questions to prove you were old enough to play the game. In the days before google, that could be pretty hardcore to get past.


#15

Virtua Cop on handheld rocked my socks off. You got a light gun with the game. A little laser like thing. And the sounds were just awesome.

  • I owned a Commodore vic20 if that counts. lol

#16

I actually owned one. Biggest mistake gift I ever got. I think I got one game for it and that’s it. I picked up a demo of the Road Rash game and it became the most played game on that system. Me and a few friends would play that game for hours just running over old ladies and knocking people in the head.


#17

Lol. BBC Micro. Old school indeed. Loading anything off of cassette was slower than anything people can even begin to imagine these days. Even the most atrocious of load times on modern games doesn’t even get close to taking as long as cassette load times.

Leisure Suit Larry was pretty interesting back in the day. I think, like you, a friend had it on his Amiga. Google and search engines in general made things way too easy for people nowadays. Who here remembers playing “Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego?” and the only way of getting the answers to the questions asked were to search through the Guinness Book of World Records (or by checking out information about certain cities)? Google, eat your heart out.


#18

The first time around, one of my friends had a jaguar. The two games we would play over and over were AvP and Iron Soldier. AvP was great but hard as hell. It was also pretty revolutionary at the time and there was nothing else like it.

Looking at the game now as a current jaguar owner it’s still hard as balls, the graphics havent held up that well, but it’s quite fun. The atmosphere is great, sound is good, the game can still scare you.


#19

I had a GP32 for quite some time. Home brew was the only good thing about it though.


#20

I just got onw a couple of months ago.

I bought it for the CPS2 emulator, and it works pretty well!
To have Alien vs predator, D&D: tower of doom and Shadow over Mystaria, Battle Circuit and Vampire savior in your pocket and play in the train is win!