Damage scaling - Explanations, research and such


#1

Hello, I explored damage scaling recently in Marvel vs. Capcom 3 and found some pretty interesting stuff that I believe is worth checking. Keep in mind, I consider this is only an overview of the matter.

Here’s the vid I uploaded.

[media=youtube]HKMgT8YHu14[/media]


#2

I don’t think you hit on anything new here. We already knew that each and every move prorates the rest of the combo by a certain amount assigned to each move. We also already knew that meter gain is proportional to the damage the combo would deal without proration. These are the two main points you seem to be hitting on in your video, and they’re kinda old news.

The real mystery is hitstun deterioration, not damage scaling. Thats operating by some weird formula we haven’t figured out yet.


#3

Hitstun deterioration seems to be based upon moves used or how long the combo takes.


#4

Hitstun deterioration seems to be based upon moves used or how long the combo takes.


#5

Well I didn’t see it explained anywhere and I was mostly just really surprised myself when I first saw how strong the damage scaling was. I mean it’s crazy how cutting combos short with morrigan is more damaging than using some of her attacks that triple the amount of hits.


#6

Marvel vs Capcom 3/Combo Limiters/Damage Scaling - Shoryuken Wiki, Marvel vs. Capcom 3 Strategy and More!

It’s been up there since about 3-5 days after the game was released.

iirc buktooth also said that it is fully detailed in the guide book for the game.


#7

Why do I suddenly feel so much of a newb

So much for ‘my’ cool find and explanations


#8

Grats you wasted your time, wasted bandwidth, and proved to everyone here how truly stupid you are. Bravo.


#9

Uhh, no shit shirlock. The question is how. Unlike damage scaling, which almost certainly is just a % assigned to each move that’s a multiplier to each subsequent move, hit stun deterioration acts very weirdly. People think that there are two separate counters, one for the air and one for the ground, but they also seem interrelated in a way that we haven’t figured out yet. It also seems like certain moves aren’t at all affected by hit stun deterioration, like S and j.S. It’s a tangled mess that we haven’t unravelled yet.

Wow, chill the hell out. Way to blow that way out of proportion.


#10

Uhh, yeah, we know. The question is how. Unlike damage scaling, which almost certainly is just a % assigned to each move that’s a multiplier to each subsequent move, hit stun deterioration acts very weirdly. People think that there are two separate counters, one for the air and one for the ground, but they also seem interrelated in a way that we haven’t figured out yet. It also seems like certain moves aren’t at all affected by hit stun deterioration, like S and j.S. It’s a tangled mess that we haven’t unravelled yet.

Wow, calm down. Way to blow that way out of proportion.


#11

nice video, thanks for making it. good for ppl who need to see it in action rather than just read about it!

clock


#12

The easiest way to learn about the concept is to go into training mode with a a game that tells you what % of damage you’re doing. I know ssf4 does it, and iirc Blazblue CS does as well.


#13

trollzilla?

i thought it was a basic but a well done video on it so good stuff


#14

If you look at the notes in my hit stun decay thread, a long enough ground string will cause hit stun decay after the launcher, even if they never leave their feet, so it isn’t completely separate. I haven’t found a good way to quantify hit stun decay on an opponent who is still standing, though, because their animation doesn’t change when they regain the ability to block and it doesn’t seem related to the time until they can jump. If I had to hazard a guess, it would be that grounded moves are just affected more strongly by hit stun decay. There’s also the fact that moves do more hit stun if they come after at least one launcher, and do more against an opponent who isn’t grounded.


#15

Keep in mind that even though there’s more dmg, triple the amount of hits is much more useful because it builds so much meter. So it’s a balance between getting that extra 100k or getting that extra 2 meters.


#16

Against standing, to check hitstun, jumping should work, yes? First figure your frame data for a jump, so you know exactly how many frames to count back from (start at when their feet leave the ground and go backwards). Since holding up will make you jump at the first possible frame, this should be a good reference.


#17

That’s what I thought, too, and what I was doing, but then I noticed that the dummy was able to block quite a few frames earlier than they were able to jump and the difference got larger as hit stun decay increased.


#18

I do indeed approach the matter in the vid. I know these combos build meter, but I find it cool that combos regarding this damage scaling business are more than one dimensionnal.

But for some characters, Like Dr.Doom. Some combos actually give roughly the same meter and do that extra 100k.

Plus, x-factor actually turns this mindset arounds, since if I recall right, XF reduces damage scaling by 60%, which makes it 100% better to use these meter building combos on hit confirm (Unless you are running low on the clock and just want a quick end)


#19

X-Factor sets the minimum damage scaling of all moves (with the strange exception of Raven Spike, which always has a minimum damage of 30%) to 50%, so it is generally better to do the longer combos. Dr. Doom, for example, has a 25% damage minimum on his level 1 hypers, so X-Factor, even ignoring the direct damage bonus, doubles the damage they do at the end of a long combo. Wesker has a damage scaling minimum of 0% on his normals, which his combos are largely made up of, so X-Factor gives a huge boost to his longer combos, as well.