Dear SRK, from a tekken 6 noob


#1

can you please teach me how to play this game. Tekken 2 was the last one that ive played seriously (if you call diong king,anna, nina’s grab combo’s and maybe 30% of the cast 10 hit combo’s serious). i played it for 2 hrs in a friends house and it seems very cool all teh faking and the long ass move list makes me feel like i should have been in this scene more than the 2d realm.

so im not really asking whos teh best person to use or cheap high low attacks but what i would like to know what are the basics that one can know where they are converting from playing a 2d to 3d? or you guys can link me a reference.

btw i couodnt stop eddie from hitting me : (


#2

heh I second this, I’ve had the game since friday and still have no idea where to start with this long ass move list :rofl:


#3

Practice is a first, try lurking TZ, and if the netcode will hold out try and find someone to do casuals with, I’m no Tekken pro but the things I said should help, here’s some links…

http://www.tekkenzaibatsu.com/legend.php
http://www.tekkenzaibatsu.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?forumid=139


#4

shit like low parry can be done by 23… but when? how many frames do you have to do it?
how many frames you got to break out a grab?


#5

Another one dies to Eddy mashing. :lol:

Should have played 3rd Strike. You would have felt right at home playing Tekken. Lots of high low mind games. Except without the free ass options selects.

I don’t know how many frames it takes for you to break a throw but it doesn’t really matter cuz top Law player Rip came up with a computer program that basically teaches you how to throw escape.

http://tekken.reepal.com/index.php/tbt/

Practice up.

I’m practicing now and it’s pretty clear that you get almost 10 frames after a throw starts to escape. The hard part is mainly telling which hand they are extending out further to throw with. The 1+2 throws are pretty hard to see for me.


#6

This is a really good read for people trying to get into the Tekken universe.


#7

I think by the time you see the grab spark, it’s too late to break. I think.

Low parries, I don’t know how long they last. I just try to VF-style fuzzy guard it in to my defense. Most mixups in the game are like, one option comes fast, and the other option comes late. so you don’t really have to worry too much about reacting to two potential options at the same time. You just have to block low during the low window and block high during the mid window, for example.

/tekken-scrub trying to give advice to a tekken-noob


#8

Hmmm…yeah you’re right. That is a little quick. I’ll just have to train myself to look for the hands. It’s kinda confusing training yourself to break differently from when you’re on the left or right side of the screen. You gotta remember that the left hand will face in front on the right side of the screen or you’ll be trying to right throw left throw escapes n shit. :lol:


#9

yo, if you’re trying to practice reaction breaking throws, you can just move in to training mode and switch modes to offensive training. Then select all the training dummy’s throws, and knock yourself out


#10

I don’t think breaking throws is that vital for a beginner. Yea, Rip’s program is an awesome tool, but there’s just so much more that needs to be learned first. Plus, you can just duck throws a lot of the time.

First, learn the jargon. Looking up combo lists is no good when you have no clue what 1,2,3,4 or iWS means. Zaibatsu is the place to go.

Second, that long ass command list you see with each char, fuck it. You only really know 5-10 of them. Those will be your high/mid/low pokes, your crushes, and of course a couple of launchers to punish whiffs. Of course, knowing launchers means you have to know some BnB juggles. I use Kazuya, one of the most complex chars in the game, and I only need to know 4 juggles at most: One for when I land an ewgf; one for when I land a WS 1,2; one for when I land a CH, and one for when I get them into a wall. This is a tough step, so I suggest you focus on one char. Lars seems to be the easiest to learn the game with.

Third, learn how to move correctly. You don’t need to be lightdashing master, but know, for example, how to sidestep to make opponents whiff and shit. If your back is close against a wall, learn to maneuver out of there. When you’re on the ground, know when’s a good time to side roll, back roll, etc etc. For example, when you are against a wall, that’s not a good place to tech back roll.

Fourth, learn how to block. Seriously.

After you learn these fundamentals, then you can learn the advance tactics such as breaking throws 100% of the time, wavedashing, your oki game, etc etc.


#11

That’s probably the best advice someone can give to a noob like me. Nothing too detailed and easy to digest. I also looked at the movelist like :wtf:


#12

Yeah the move list is like playing SF. There’s a bunch of stuff yeah but it’s just for variety’s sake during casual play. Tournament play is about which moves have the best frames and range and which lead to the most damage safely.