Difference between a person being an online or offline fighter


#1

What do people mean by that? Im new to this crap, so i hear ppl say it and im like y would there be a difference. More serious players offline? Because i hear of ppl bitch bout online players being butt munches and being cheap. I only play street fighter so thats what im referring to.


#2

On a lot of online games you can’t punish unsafe things as easily, or react to things as quickly.  so an online player is someone who abuses lag and throws out unsafe things regularly.  when you play against an online player you find yourself saying “that shit doesn’t work offline” as the match goes on.<div><br></div><div>not everyone does it on purpose.  a lot of players play online only and have no idea what they’re doing is easily stoppable offline.</div>


#3

Ahh i got ya. I only play online. Only a couple games offline with a friend. Not many ppl round here play


#4

There’s also the fact that the fighting game community has its roots in offline competition and that the major events are offline (rightfully so since online changes the game so much). Being “online only” can seem negative when it’s seen as not supporting the community by not going to events.


#5

<blockquote class=“Quote”>
<div class=“QuoteAuthor”><a href="/profile/81380/nsreeder">nsreeder</a> said:</div>
<div class=“QuoteText”>What do people mean by that? Im new to this crap, so i hear ppl say it and im like y would there be a difference. More serious players offline? Because i hear of ppl bitch bout online players being butt munches and being cheap. I only play street fighter so thats what im referring to. </div>
</blockquote>

There’s very little difference other than preference.  But keep in mind that any bit of lag tends to change how you’re able to react and time your combos, which is a big issue, and is largely why online competition isn’t taken seriously by the community at large.  Online is a great way to practice and learn matchups, but if you want to prove that you’re a good player, you have to attend offline sessions.  Fighting games have always had their roots in the offline, face-to-face scene, and often if you’re not part of that environment, you’re seen as missing out on the real heart of the community.<br><br>That and people tend to talk more shit online.  It’s pretty easy to talk shit when you’re safely hiding behind a monitor, but if you try that offline, you’re likely to get your shit pushed in.  This has the side effect of people being nicer and more friendly in an offline setting (usually), where you’re better able to create a tight-knit local community. 


#6

Chinatown Fair was all shit talking.


#7

<blockquote class=“Quote”>
<div class=“QuoteAuthor”><a href="/profile/601/Raz0r">Raz0r</a> said:</div>
<div class=“QuoteText”>Chinatown Fair was all shit talking. </div>
</blockquote>

arcade shit talk is still a far cry from suburban white boys calling you a nigger scrub on XBL because it was too laggy to punish their whiff lp shoryus<br>


#8

I got ya. I was hoping to test my skills at philly last weekend but no converter or anything to play on ps3. I would have gotten my ass handed to me, but it would have been a lot of fun being there and talking bout sfxt. Im currently in the process of understanding frame data. Theres a great write up on the boards for it ive been checking out.


#9

I hear that a lot. I just started using private chats or no mic. When i played marvel online it was annoying.


#10

<BLOCKQUOTE class=Quote>
<DIV class=QuoteAuthor><A href="/profile/81380/nsreeder">nsreeder</A> said:</DIV>
<DIV class=QuoteText>I got ya. I was hoping to test my skills at philly last weekend but no converter or anything to play on ps3. I would have gotten my ass handed to me, but it would have been a lot of fun being there and talking bout sfxt. Im currently in the process of understanding frame data. Theres a great write up on the boards for it ive been checking out. </DIV></BLOCKQUOTE>I’m not even sure if there are reliable xbox-to-ps3 converters or vice versa on the market.  Plenty of ps2 converters that work, but not cross modern console stuff.  Your best bet is to either a) be nice, don’t act like an asshole, and ask to borrow someone’s stick for your tourney match (most guys are cool with this), or b) dual-mod your stick (parts cost $30-$60) to work on both xbox and ps3.  <BR><BR>Tourneys are nice, but casual sessions and gettting to know the locals is even better.  Frame data can be a great tool if you know how to use it right, but you can certainly improve as a player without having to know that kind of stuff.  Practice and the ability to analyze your matches will get you much further. <BR>


#11

<font face=“Arial, Verdana” size=“2”><span style=“line-height: normal;”>Inb4talkoflaglessonlineplay</span></font><div style=“font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-size: 10pt; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;”><br></div><div style=“font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-size: 10pt; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;”><br></div><div style=“font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-size: 10pt; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;”>I use to be an online warrior, but after years of grinding, I realized that no matter how many decent connections I played with, I was always gonna run across some idiot playing with an unstable (green bar) connection. I also realized no matter how many points I got, there was always gonna be some fraud getting points from his friends to stay on top of the boards. You can’t force high rank players (or any players for that matter) to play you if they refuse, and neg repping ragequitters won’t stop them from doing it in the future. TLDR online play was pointless. I still use it as a pseudo training mode, but not as a basis for proving my skill. </div><div style=“font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-size: 10pt; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;”><br></div><div><font face=“Arial, Verdana” size=“2”><span style=“line-height: normal;”>There’s no excuses when you play offline. There are no dropped packets or random lag spikes. Nobody can avoid you in a tourney if they want to be the best, and people don’t talk trash unless they can back it up irl. On top of that, you get to experience the comunnity part of the FGC, complete with hype men, crowd reactions, money matches, and after-tourney dining (the best part of any major). </span></font></div>


#12

Id absolutely love to play locals with ppl from the area. Thatd be way better. Just havent found anything. Im sure there is just dont really know of any. I was going to get the ps360+ or just sell my stick and buy one thats good on both consoles. Yea converters are horrible with missed inputs. Ive played a lot of sfxt so i kno most of the match ups. Just looking to be more knowledgeable in fighting games is all. I wont remember that frame data, way to much info. Just looking for general idea so i know what people r talking about and how to find safer moves and attacks. I kno my abilities and know that im no where near tourney level. Maybe could win some local stuff but thats it. I just love the game and want to witness the atmosphere of a tournament and the people.


#13

It all depends on what your level of involvement. Yes, offline is probably the most optimal way to play unless you live in Japan or somewhere where they have blazing fast connections. But there’s nothing wrong with being an online-only player if that’s what you want to do. You have a lot of people here that forget that not everyone’s interested in being a tourney-level player. <br><br>But honestly, as much as I’d love to be going to tournaments and practicing all the time, I just don’t have the time. My career keeps me really busy and so online is really about the only option I have unless I get an odd weekend off and can head to some local meetup. But that rarely happens. So for me, it’s either play online, or play Arcade or Training mode by myself. <br>


#14

<blockquote class=“Quote”>
<div class=“QuoteAuthor”><a href="/profile/81380/nsreeder">nsreeder</a> said:</div>
<div class=“QuoteText”>Id absolutely love to play locals with ppl from the area. Thatd be way better. Just havent found anything. Im sure there is just dont really know of any. I was going to get the ps360+ or just sell my stick and buy one thats good on both consoles. Yea converters are horrible with missed inputs. Ive played a lot of sfxt so i kno most of the match ups. Just looking to be more knowledgeable in fighting games is all. I wont remember that frame data, way to much info. Just looking for general idea so i know what people r talking about and how to find safer moves and attacks. I kno my abilities and know that im no where near tourney level. Maybe could win some local stuff but thats it. I just love the game and want to witness the atmosphere of a tournament and the people. </div>
</blockquote>

From my personal experience, PS360+ is an extremely good PCB.  If you’re able to install it yourself, it actually might end up being cheaper than selling your old stick and buying a new one, depending on how much you get and what you’re willing to buy for a new one.  But for $60 in parts, getting a stick that will work on all modern consoles, and potentially future consoles as well, with no extra cost to you, is a fairly good investment.  <br><br>I’m not sure what you mean by ‘tourney’ level.  80% of all players in a tourney aren’t experienced veterans, they’re guys like you that love the game and want to be able to meet and compete against other players.  Plus, joining tournaments is a great way to expose yourself to higher levels of play, and show where you’re strong and where you’re weak.  You might think you know certain matchups, but once you play against guys of a higher caliber, you’ll probably realize that you’ll have to adjust your strategy.  Either way, even just watching tournament matches live and playing in casuals, will already greatly improve your gameplay.  


#15

Yea i could install it, i always mess with that electronic stuff. If theres another local tournament im gonna check it out. By tournament player i mean people who are really good and way above my level. Maybe im overestimating the players, but im sure id still get rolled there. Im only a b rank and thats where ive been for awhile. I play a lot of online. Im happy where im at for my first fighting game ever, but im always looking to improve. Definitely the match ups change when u play higher level competition. I see all sorts of shit thats new to me. Thats y i watch a lot of videos of high ranked players and watch what they do.


#16

<BLOCKQUOTE class=Quote>
<DIV class=QuoteAuthor><A href="/profile/81380/nsreeder">nsreeder</A> said:</DIV>
<DIV class=QuoteText>Yea i could install it, i always mess with that electronic stuff. If theres another local tournament im gonna check it out. By tournament player i mean people who are really good and way above my level. Maybe im overestimating the players, but im sure id still get rolled there. Im only a b rank and thats where ive been for awhile. I play a lot of online. Im happy where im at for my first fighting game ever, but im always looking to improve. Definitely the match ups change when u play higher level competition. I see all sorts of shit thats new to me. Thats y i watch a lot of videos of high ranked players and watch what they do. </DIV></BLOCKQUOTE>Most guys aren’t killers.  Either way, you’ll never know unless you play them yourself.  You won’t improve unless you start playing better players then yourself, to help show you where you’re weak in your gameplay.  Watching videos is great to nail down the theory of what you need to do in a match, but you really need to practice at it and play it out in order to cement it.<BR><BR>The only requirement of being a “tournament player”…is that you show up to tournaments.  That’s it.  <BR>


#17

I noticed that when I play offline I’m able to pick up on habits A LOT faster. I’m able to adapt to a situation and understand what I did wrong. Online I can also do these things but its mostly confusion


#18

<blockquote class=“Quote”>
<div class=“QuoteAuthor”><a href="/profile/601/Raz0r">Raz0r</a> said:</div>
<div class=“QuoteText”>Chinatown Fair was all shit talking. </div>
</blockquote>

<br>Summer nights at CTF, the smell may be gone but not forgotten!<br>


#19

<font face=“Arial, Verdana” size=“2”><span style=“line-height: normal;”>What’s incredible now, is you have a generation out there now, mainly born post 1990 I guess, who may well have never played a fighting game standing up or sitting next to another person. That must truly fukken suck. Virtually every fighting game out there now with any kind of online ranked mode has these bogusly inflated accounts that you will never, ever meet offline.</span></font><div><font face=“Arial, Verdana” size=“2”><span style=“line-height: normal;”><br></span></font></div><div><font face=“Arial, Verdana” size=“2”><span style=“line-height: normal;”>People quick to throw out the race hate too when they lose hard, that shit’ll get you stamped on hard or arrested, standing in front of an arcade machine. Also, however many videos and forums you see, it’s hard to beat being walked through complex game mechanics in person by a better player.</span></font></div>


#20

I hate when I see things online that I know wouldn’t work offline.  Anyone who’s fought a Lion in VF5FS knows what I’m talking about.