Does playing in real matches help? Even if you can't use an arcade stick efficiently?


#1

I’m currently just going into training mode daily with my TE and just practicing moves until I get them right without messing them up. Right now as an Ibuki player the road seems even harder because I can no longer do her chains, combo into specials or finish my link combos. I can do the normal links but I can’t cancel into specials.

I can do specials when I’m not comboing into them. However, when I attempt to make a cancel happen it feels like my hand becomes encased in a block of ice disabling me from getting out any special move.

I haven’t been in any real matches yet, but I’m thinking if I just sit there and not play until my executions perfect then I won’t be used to the game anymore.

I hesitate to post this here because I know how volatile the SRK community can be. Which is why I try to refrain from posting too much.


#2

play with friends who can help you training.
you need to know wich combo can go where. Some combos are useless or there are better one you need to mix real game and training mode to know how to use your pg efficently
and btw many combo use up a lot of meter and consuming it to do little more damage isn’t always a good idea since i have more tool to apply pressure without fear of punishment


#3

The problem is your ‘over learning’ it happens when you spend way too much time practicing and not applying the science you learned in a real match making it harder to learn new stuff. It’s like trying to load 5 GB of data onto a 4 GB SD Card, it’s just not gonna happen. You need to unload what you learned and then when you have it locked down in your mind you can learn some more because the information is already there.

Your ultimate goal is to take what you learn and try them on real opponents, you should’nt expect to win matches but your goal is to win none the less. At that time you should apply what you learned and see what is effective or not. Some of Ibukis combos (like many others) are situational, your not guarunteed to get them off and your opponent (If he’s seasoned) will know how to defend your attempts if made obvious. You need to play people only to learn how to play people, not learn new moves because your opponent is not gonne give you a chance to use them, at least not for free.

As far as inputting special moves from chains (Called Target Combos) and links, you need to buffer the directional inputs as your doing the the last one or two hits from your combo. There is an input leniancy in the directional inputs so you can do the motions and have maybe .50 seconds to press the button and complete the special move. Through training you will learn to do this via muscle memory, just learn them one at a time.

Maybe you should give us some examples of what combos your trying to link and we can help you with that at least. Hope this helps.


#4

Basically I just want to do Ibukis practical BnB’s when I need to. When I block something unsafe, see someone whiff anything with slow recovery or hit confirm when I land a standing or crouching jab.

For example if I block an SRK but I’m not close enough for LP -> MP -> HP xxx neckbreaker I want to be able to do crouching MP into neckbreaker instead. Or if a get a crouching jab I want to be able to do another into standing jab into standing forward cancel with neckbreaker.

Those are the main combos I use when I get in.


#5

Learn 1 or 2 think at a time
Go to real Match to try it off
see if they pay and when
repeat


#6

FUCKING PAD PLAYER, FUCKING SCRUB, FUCKING LEARN SOME LINKS YOU FUCKING RETARD.

No, look, you won’t gain real execution skills UNLESS you do stuff in real matches. Pulling off a combo in training mode is one thing, being able to do it under pressure in a real match is something else entirely.


#7

I was in your shoes until this past weekend. Sitting in training mode and practicing combos I’d found on the forums, basic BnBs, canceling normals into specials. I was pretty happy with myself because my execution had been improving a ton(I swapped from pad to stick with SSFIV).

That weekend I participated in a Ranbats, I’d been sandbagging about playing online and I’d only played a friend randomly once or twice. Needless to say I got my ass handed to me but I learned a lot.

Practicing in training mode can definitely help but now I feel like it’s more for fine tuning and teaching yourself reactions for situational things. Since the ranbats I’ve been playing online with my friend coaching me and it’s definitely made a difference.

Once you break the ice and get your feet wet you lose some of the nerves and jitters. You’ll grow accustomed to the feeling and your execution will suffer less and less.

Go out and get you some, stay confident and do your best to win! It can be pretty rough starting out but you’ll be better for it in the long run. Good luck!


#8

double post, sorry


#9

I’ve been hitting the lab multiple times to get the execution going not playing only but then when I was finally content ( I could do few moves without effing the move up )
I got my ass handed to me because I can’t move for the love of god with the stick…

Is there any way you can practice this or some kind of method to move fluid or is this also experience because i love my TE.
I know this sound silly but even the cpu downright played with me…


#10

You still need to practice them under the pressure of a real match.

Everyone can do EVERYTHING in training mode, it’s during matches that we fuck up.


#11

Best post of the thread in my opinion.


#12

practice makes perfect. training mode is fine, but you need to be able to do it while your in the hot seat(under pressure/ranked/consistently).


#13

learn just one combo at a time. learn it in training, then play real matches till you can land it, then go back to training and learn another combo. Start with her basic punish/BnB combo and go from there.


#14

I need help with finding a grip that doesn’t make me rest my wrist on the surface of my stick. When my wrist is making contact with the surface the motions are causing my wrist to rub against the stick, creating a painful friction after about 20 minutes of use.


#15

The problem with training mode, boards don’t hit back.

In training mode you can set up an ideal condition to land a long damaging combo, anybody can hit a punching back that doesn’t block.

In a real match your windows of opportunity to land those combos are fractions of a second. To be effective you must learn the timing and rhythm to land those punishes.

Also don’t forget those one or two hit counters. Footsies add up. A computer is less than ideal to practicing footsies.


#16

try the wine glass two or three finger grip.

also play in real matches learn your normals, other things will come with time


#17

maybe stop being a whiney little *** on a shitty ass forum and get practicing.


#18

People aren’t understanding that I’m not a beginner. I’m just switching from pad to stick.


#19

Yes. Unless you are a robot, your execution will not be as good in a real match as it is in training mode or casuals. Distractions, pressure, and other external factors will impair your ability to preform. And the only way to get used to this is to play under these conditions as frequently as possible. So yes, even if your execution is ass, playing real matches will help you.


#20

Not really, no.

I switched from pad to stick a ways back and it really is starting from square one. You miss the punishes, your set ups are a half second too slow, etc. So you will lose. Lose a lot. Lost a lot a LOT. And as people have noted, hitting combos in match is harder than in training mode which means its even harder to figure where the combo botched. What I like to do is go to training, practice it until I hit it (easy to say once you can play on stick, fuck all hard if specials are a burden) and then try it out in matches until its internalized. Once you get really good with the stick, you can just freestyle it in matches even.

In summary, no; matches add extra difficulty in learning stick as well as frustration - but hell, if you’re here you must like to play so play. Its not like you can’t do both.