Drawing/Sketching fundementals thread


#1

This thread is for people who want to learn how to draw anything from their imagination whilst maintaining a sense of realism in their work. The rules for this thread if you decide to post your own artwork are:

-Work must be in either graphite pencil (single colours) or black ink or charcoal on any sized paper, I’d suggest A5 but use whatever you find most practical.
-You can draw anything you like but try to show variety in your work.
-Work can NOT be older than 2 months.

If you can’t follow these simple rules just post your work in the lounge thread.

The topics I want to discuss in this thread are as followed (Tiered from most most important to least).

*Drawing ANYTHING from life, especially human antomy.
*Understanding human Anatomy: Muscle groups and Bones, Drawing the male and female body, Different body types and proportions.
*Mech Design, Drawing Cars, Planes and anything else that’s non organic
*Knowing the most common Animal Anatomy and Creature Design
*Drawing Objects in Perspective. Really basic to really advanced perspective tricks.
*How to render an Object, Lighting and Shade, Drawing Creases in Clothing
*Composition, Rule of thirds, The Golden Ratio, Camera views/Lenses.
*Freehand drawing exercises such as silhouette sketching, Straight line exercises, circle/ellipse patterns.

Personally I believe the most important topic in sketching is drawing from life, especially when it comes to human anatomy. I’d highly recommend going to as many life figure drawing session as possible if you can afford it, especially the ones that make you do the really fast gesture drawings (30 seconds - 2 minutes), do this often if you want to improve. If you want to draw a particular pose just set up a mirror beside your drawing table and become your own model, if not, ask your friends, wife, girlfriend, ANYBODY to pose for you. Have them take pictures of you if you need references. You have to develop a feel for anatomy and clothing by drawing them from life over and over again. Don’t learn by copying other artists. Develop your own approach and style by going straight to the source!

At least 50% of your sketchbook should be filled with Male and female figures sketched from life.

Posts I’ve found on the net explaining why Life drawing is important:

Bret Blevin’s why draw from life: part1part2part3

I think the topics I’ve mentioned cover just about everything. Feel free to ask questions.

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#2

#3

What are some good handercises to do to help get me cleaner lines? Mine can be pretty ugly looking and would greatly like to improve this.


#4

I make sketches with a pen as an excercise to improve my line.


#5

I didn’t think I’d get responses this soon.

Use a pen as Hectom said so that your mistakes are visible and permanent. You learn a lot faster when you can’t instantly erase mistakes. I do a number of exercises which I’ll post directly from my pad next week (hopefully sooner). As of right now watch thisand this. He doesn’t cover the best exercises to do but its a start.


#6

May we draw abstract images? I’m not very good at drawing life like things. Much of the art I have done have been intuitive abstractions.


#7

Yes, in graphite or black ink.


#8

Back when I did Architecture, we were taught to draw big to improve how we drew small. So we drew loads of A1 sized sketches before doing A3s.


#9

When practicing drawing exercises or sketching large environments (especially when you have to plot perspective grids) you need to draw large. A5 just seems practical for sketching anywhere. Hectom drew on a A4 piece of paper but he only showed us 1/3rd of the page, if that’s what works best for you then do it. I can relax the rules to anything larger than A5, but the graphite and black ink rule still stands. Drawing small helps to improve your precision and attention to detail.

I also have a lot of art, anatomy and perspective books in Pdf which I’ll be uploading soon.


#10

Personally I believe the most important topic in sketching is drawing from life, especially when it comes to human anatomy. I’d highly recommend going to as many life figure drawing session as possible if you can afford it, especially the ones that make you do the really fast gesture drawings (30 seconds - 2 minutes), do this often if you want to improve. If you want to draw a particular pose just set up a mirror beside your drawing table and become your own model, if not, ask your friends, wife, girlfriend, ANYBODY to pose for you. Have them take pictures of you if you need references. You have to develop a feel for anatomy and clothing by drawing them from life over and over again. Don’t learn by copying other artists. Develop your own approach and style by going straight to the source!

At least 50% of your sketchbook should be filled with Male and female figures sketched from life.

If you want to learn more about human anatomy go to www.biodigitalhuman.com/ (I haven’t used this site yet because I’m having issues with my PC but I’ve heard its good).


#11

aww. cool. i used to be really into sketching till i hit high school. took paid classes and stuff. but in school they made me use a bunch of BS mediums that i really didnt care for, like water color. or they made me do stuff i knew i wouldnt be interested in like commercial lettering. i hated the classes and it totally turned me away from art as a whole. i havent seriously sketched anything in close to 15 years now, but ive been having these urges to get back into it. maybe i’ll start up again


#12

you fuckers didnt tag me in this. shammmmeee

get in here @Negaduck‌


#13

The only mediums that need to be learnt are traditional graphite pencil sketching, Inking with pens, knowing how to use Copic markers, Digital painting and editing with Photoshop and 3d modelling with Zbrush.
Everything else is pretty much worthless except sculpting but I don’t think its a necessity to learn like the other mediums I mentioned. It works wonders if you want to learn anatomy by sculpting your own anatomical figure.

I’ll tier the most important topics to learn to the least important. All updates will be on my first post. I’ll stress even more that mastering human anatomy from life to the point where you don’t need reference material is the most valuable skill to learn in art. A perfectly rendered image will still look horrible if the basic anatomy and structure is bad.


#14

Here are some Loomis books to DL. If you only need one book I’d highly recommend “Figure drawing for all its worth”.

http://www.alexhays.com/loomis/


#15

I’m definitely in on this, my roommate and I were talking about trying to get back into drawing again. Looks like all my anatomy and physiology classes are gonna help me out :slight_smile:


#16

I’m taking figure drawing classes next semester. My human character designs in my comic need work.


#17

I’ll upload my anatomy books in this thread but you’ll have to PM me for the other books. I don’t want SRK to get shut down over piracy/copyright issues.


#18

Holla. Good lookin Manx.

What about marker work? Is this just traditional work and not digital? Been working with markers a lot lately to become more confident in my choices.

@Joshkaz‌ draw a line on a blank piece of paper across the length with a ruler, then try and create lines trying to make them as straight as possible until you fill up the paper (use your arm to draw the line, not your wrist). This will help you become more confident in drawing straight lines in your art as well as clean up the Lines you make.

This was done with pencil, then inked over, then marketed and finally a white paint pen for highlights.

http://i.imgur.com/bCOfMWI.jpg


#19

In regards to fundamentals, does the core stuff for doing work like this merit discussion?


^Soundwave vs. Blaster, BTW.

In regards to the subtle details that is, like the hard-to-see wiring that in the context of big machines and things like these two guys, is vital to their very functioning, for one of the most important aspects.


#20

^ Your image appears to be broken.

BMO is such a little cutie~