Execution Training and Sound


#1

I don’t have a Tv for my PS3 so I use one of my computer monitors with a DVI - HDMI adapter…

Not being able to have sound for my PS3 will yield some interesting results in the long run.

[media=youtube]mRnfXzax94c#t=8m25s[/media] Daigo demonstrates execution in silence, which makes me wonder if he does that when he’s practicing.

What do you guys think of practicing in silence?


#2

no one?


#3

I guess it helps him know when the joystick clicks, or registers an input. It probably is useful because you know when that input has registered and get used to hearing that sound. I’ve been practicing execution too, since I got a stick like a month ago, and what helps me is just practicing the motion inputs slowly and then speeding up. This helps me know where I have to go and what range of motion is required in order to correctly input a move.


#4

why don’t you use the composite cables for sound? just plug them into speakers.


#5

I inherited this PS3 from a friend, who gave the composite cables away. I was just thinking what advantages I could find without sound.


#6

I’m using the same setup for my 360. I suppose its plausible that its a disadvantage because having audio cues might help you react to things better but I dont think it makes any difference.

you could think of it as training for a tournament where you might have to play without sound or play in a noisy environment.


#7

According to Juicebox, practicing without sound or with headphones on forces you to rely on muscle memory instead of sound cues. He recommends this as a way of training your hands instead of your ears.


#8

I tried this and it was ok, but in a match I found it extremely hard. I don’t know about you, but there’s just something about playing in silence that makes me feel slightly uncomfortable, it’s like when I’m reading or something I like the TV on just to provide background sound.


#9

Insider scoop time. Tips straight from the pros.

The top pro players usually practice combos with the volume turned off. This is to eliminate habituation of relying on sound cues when executing difficult links. In a tournament setting, the crowds can get so loud that you wouldn’t be able to hear the game’s sound effects, so you are expected to perform purely by muscle memory.

Ideally, you should be practicing with the volume off and play a loud audience track, possibly live metal concert footage. The deafer you are, the better you will perform at tournaments.

Bonus: At a tournament setting, your opponent would probably be smacking an empty button to trick you into thinking they are executing a move. This is a common bait tactic. If you can somehow phase out all the audience and button pressing noises, then you wouldn’t have to worry about this problem.

I recommend using noise-canceling headphones or earmuffs or even ear plugs. A lot of pro players started using these things until they fully mastered phasing out noise. It could take some meditation practice. If you look at some old tourney footage, you could usually find Mike Ross sporting some noise-canceling headphones.

If you aren’t planning to play at tournaments, practice with the volume off anyway. You’ll find yourself executing a whole lot better. The worlds best pianists are masters of muscle memory. Did you know Beethoven was deaf, but performed on the piano flawlessly due to amazing muscle memory? Now you know! :tup:


#10

thank you so much. u have no idea how this helped!!!


#11

This is pretty legit information, I’ll keep this in mind when practicing.


#12

give it a shot. I think it will help you in the long run. You can see quite a few people playing with noise canceling headphones.


#13

I got a question does using your mp3 player count too for noise canceling? I usually play with music going on in my head to cancel out background sounds that I dont want to hear


#14

Anything that removes the sound from the game is good.


#15

you’re forgetting about the sounds he makes when he pushes the buttons haha