Fundamentals?


#1

So after playing Marvel for 2 years, I still get bopped easily

I realised my problem is because I have no fundamentals.

What are these fundamentals? I’m assuming footsies and spacing?
And how do I go about improving on these?

I tried playing Ultra to focus more on these but it hasn’t been paying off. I’ll definitely try some more and focus on patience.


#2

What do you have trouble with the most?

“Fundamentals” cover such a wide area that even seasoned players will give you a different answer every time. For example, when someone tells me they have a problem with spacing, I’m still not sure what they mean. In general, you space yourself in a way that’s good for your character, but not that great for your opponent. But this is matchup-specific knowledge. Also, if you look at a character like Ryu, he can space himself either at a range where he is strong playing footsies, or where he is strong zoning with fireballs and anti-airing. He will position himself differently in each case.

In short, give us some information about the character you use, and what you struggle with the most. Do you have trouble opening up the opponent? Are you weak on defense? etc etc.


#3

How do you realize you have no fundamentals if you don’t know what they are?
Marvel fundamentals are nothing like Street Fighter fundamentals. Practicing Ultra is not going to help you much in playing marvel, they are distinctly different. Especially if you are playing Blanka, as your signature suggests because he’s a pretty gimmicky character that skirts a lot of street fighter fundamentals. Ever hear commentators say “He’s playing Street Fighter in Marvel”? That’s a novelty because the style of footsies is entirely different. Looking at your teams I can see they are constructed well, do you understand why you are playing those teams in that order or are you simply just parroting successful things you’ve seen without knowing why they work?

Are you covering you’re approach with an assist and similarly using your approach to cover your assist?

The equivalent of footsies and spacing in marvel is what people call controlling the neutral. What are you doing to move your situation from the neutral to getting the hit?


#4





^Much of this information applies to SF4. He explains zoning better than anyone IMO.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wx6Z5VGsBw4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aXB8xHLA0To

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FQQCan5oo90 <- the absolute best tutorial ive seen on footsies so far.


#5

sweep sweep sweep sweep throw. Sweep sweep sweep throw. :wink: jk


#6

http://youtu.be/5ntNmonMvNk


#7

Did nobody read that he is asking about marvel fundamentals?


#8

LOL! I know right. I came in here and read the OP and was like, “Oh, can’t help. Don’t play Marvel.” Then I read the posts . . . “Uh, do Street Fighter ‘fundamentals’ apply to Marvel?” I honestly don’t know, but from what I’ve seen I can’t imagine they do. At least not in any specific way.

I guess everyone’s just trying to kill off Marvel in any way possible.


#9

They’re different huh? Guess I’ll won’t worry too much about SF then

Well, Nova needs a beam assist to approach and cold star is for bullying purposes once I have the opponent on blockstun. The latter also applies for doom. And ammy is a great anchor

I feel that this is one of the things I don’t do. I always go in with a raw c.M with Nova when it should be backed up by the beam. I think this is something I should condition myself.

I always thought SF fundamentals transcend to other different games. If this isn’t the case, then what makes fighting game players play well in different FGs?


#10

You definitely need to cover your approach like that, raw cr. M is very unsafe. Opening the round you may want to do something like back up, put out gravimetric pulse, toss an energy javelin and call doom, then start to go in based on how your opponent reacts. This way you have 3 things covering nova and 3 things covering Doom (including Nova himself). You can square dash in with dolphin kick because it option selects into throw, you can try the cr. M, or you can wait and see what your opponent does. Watch how Nemo and Coach Steve open rounds and make their approaches. The differences in teams are essentially inconsequential because Doom/Strange are similar neutral assists.

Street Fighter fundamentals do transfer in a lot of ways, but playing street fighter is not going to make you better at marvel by any means, other than possibly adding patience and learning to read opponents tendencies. Marvel is more of an anime/airdasher sort of game, movement is a lot more varied and that changes the footsies aspect a lot.

Also don’t undervalue the wiki:

http://wiki.shoryuken.com/Ultimate_Marvel_vs_Capcom_3/Strategy


#11

Good fundamentals do apply to all games, that’s why they’re called fundamentals. In my mind, having good fundamentals means you have experience in what it takes to win at fighting games. They help you react, adapt, and learn faster. It’s the reason why some players (think of Justin Wong or Chris G) can literally pick up any game and be good with it on day one, because they’re not playing “the game” specifically, they’re just playing a fighting game and drawing upon all of their universal experience. In contrast, there are other players who specialize in one or two games, and while they may be very talented players, they will take more time adjusting to new games because their fundamentals are comparatively lacking.

I would argue that no game has “different fundamentals” or “less focus on fundamentals”, they just focus harder on some areas than others. SF4 and Marvel (UMvC3 especially) are polar opposites in this regard. Think about it in terms of space control, because that’s the core of every fighting game.

In SF4, movement is limited. Attack vectors are limited. That’s what makes the game so scientific, and opens up all of the footsies that you see in high-level play, because the two players are constantly comparing and predicting from a relatively limited set of options, while simultaneously using their movement to enhance their options or disrupt their opponents’.

In Marvel, on the other hand, movement is more frantic and freeform. Attacks can come from anyfuckingwhere. There is still a finite set of actions that each player can take, but the range is much wider, and so it’s hard to account for all of the variables. The footsies still exist, the neutral game still exists, but you must shift your predictions to cover a wider range of options, and this usually leads to a proactive approach being more effective than a reactive one. That’s why you’ll often hear scrubs say that Marvel players are just mashing buttons and waiting for a hitconfirm, but they’re not. They’re strategically placing all that crap on the screen to cover their opponent’s options in the best way they can while avoiding getting bopped.

Anyway, different people will give you different definitions of what fundamentals are, but that’s what they’ve always meant to me. I don’t think fundamentals operate on a per-game basis, and I don’t think they can be practiced. You only pick them up through experience. Everything you’re asking about applies very specifically to Marvel neutral, in which case, the fastest way to improve is to play & learn more Marvel. Once you get good at that, you will notice ways in which you can apply your Marvel experience to other games, and that is when you’ll realize that you’ve finally notched some fundamentals.


#12

well champ does mash lol strategically
but in all seriousness fundamentals can transfer to any game
you can practice certain components of fundamentals i.e ranges and confirming but some depend on a high sense of intuition and that only comes with experience and live gameplay

street fighter fundamentals exist in marvel its just that they are highlighted more in last character scrambles. in the early stages of the match they are hidden under a multilayered system of trying to constrict your opponents movement thanks to assists
in 3d games such as tekken you account for different points of attack too