Getting into tournaments for young players


#1

Hello shoryuken, big question. I’m in high school and have been into fighting games ever since I first watched an EVO stream in 2010. I want to start going to tournaments, but I have a few problems that restrict me. There’s the fact that im in high school. To make it even worse, my mother HATES my gaming habits, claiming I’m obsessed and play too much even though I can only play on fridays and days off from school. In fact, the only person in my family that is interested in fighting games is my older cousin, who sometimes goes to events. But, how can I start going to tournaments and playing competitively in this sitiuation (playin online can be bs at times, which you should already know).


#2

To start competing in events, go to events and compete in them. <br><br>You’re in high school, so I figure there’s at least a couple of people who are also interested in fighting games. Put up a paper or something with your e-mail or something to try and find other people nearby who’d be into getting some games in. You’re in HS, so I mean you’re probably not going to go on around the country hitting up every tournament. But if there’s local events, you should just try to hit those up.<br><br>As for your mom, that’s on you. Frankly, you’d think that an activity that lets her (assuming) son go out and meet new people, and compete in something that he enjoys wouldn’t be so bad. <br><br><br>


#3

I think what he’s really asking is that he wants to play in tournaments but with having a mom that disapproves of his hobby how he should go about doing so. And the answer to that is very obvious: to hell with your mom and start going to tournaments. There’s no secret to it, you start doing what you want to do and stop living life for someone else. It’s very unlikely that you can change her mind. The only thing you can do is to just tell her that playing in tournaments is meaningful and enjoyable for you (assuming it is) and just go – or you can hide this from her, but that’s an annoyance and a future headache waiting to happen. <br><br>Also if you want to start playing in tournaments just playing a bit on the weekends and days when you don’t have school won’t be enough. Unless you’re fine with with going 0 - 2 every tournament and simply donating your money you’ll need to put some effort and time into this, like anything in life. <br>


#4

 I’m 18 so I kinda know how you feel. My parents don’t like my habits either, but when I decided I wanted to go to Seasons beatings ascension (which was a decent little ways away from my house), I had a few points to prevent my mom from stopping me.<div><br></div><div>1. I have a job. She couldn’t say it would cost too much, because I was paying all of my expenses unassisted.</div><div>2. I don’t get out all that much besides work and the occasional visit to a friends house. So any reason for me to leave the house is good enough for her.</div><div>3. I have a car so I could transport myself and not inconvenience her. If you don’t have your own, try to catch a ride with your cousin.</div><div>4. Let your mom know where you’ll be at. They like to know shit like that.</div><div><br></div><div>If you can’t say the same for yourself about some of my points, car, job, whatever, try to make them happen. That way when your mom objects to you hitting up a tourney, reply very respectively with why it isnt a problem for her if you go.</div><div><br></div><div>TL;DR Make yourself look like a responsible and mature adult, and parents tend to be a bit more lenient about the things they let you do.</div>


#5

Yeah, just get a plan together on how to get there, how to pay for it, etc and tell her about it. Same thing I did with EVO, and my folks were hunky dory with me being overnight 2 days in Vegas. Presentation is really important when you’re trying to appear on top of things.


#6

at this crucial age, better look improving your grades and you can go to tourneys later. they will not leave.<br>you can go to tourneys during holidays. <br>


#7

oh lol, I came here thinking young player meant like kids. Was going to say fgc isn’t a good scene for kids. <br><br>Concentrate on studies, here’s a little secret<br><br><strike>a lot of hardcore fgc players are broke bums, you’re young. Don’t go down that path</strike><br>


#8

How are your grades?<div><br></div><div>If they are already good, point out that you’ve demonstrated you’re responsible for your age. Ask mom and dad to give you the benefit of the doubt.</div><div><br></div><div>If they aren’t good, they should be. Try to make a deal with them that after you improve them, you get to attend tournaments (so long as you can maintain your grades). This is win/win for you.</div>


#9

I’m sort of in the same situation and I’m a college student.<div><br></div><div>I however made the choice of making school a priority. Sure I try to make it to casuals such as San Diego’s Anime/Dustloop Fridays or Oceanside Fight Club to hang out, but other than that, I’m willing to sacrifice playing time if I need to study for midterms/work on a huge assignment/etc. However that doesn’t mean I’m not looking forward to entering tournaments. So far I only entered small scale tournaments in SD for P4A and I’m going to try my best to make it to those events in the LA region where all the more skillful SoCal P4A players are at.</div><div><br></div><div>And I do agree with those who say make school your priority obviously.</div>


#10

My mother used to be negative about it as well, but gradually I was able to show my parents that this hobby had a positive impact in my life.<br>I feel it made more analytical and just smarter all around. Always during lunch I would talk to my parents about what Ive been learning.<br>I didn’t even need to be specific. I would tell them stuff like:<br>“Hey, so somebody just discovered something in my game and therefore, I know have to juggle 8 options when attacking”<br>“My favorite player just won a tournament after recovering mentally from losing really bad”<br><br>Little stuff like that. The point is to transmit your passion. I’m an adult now, but if it wasn’t because my parents saw the passion in me when I was your age, they wouldn’t have taken me to EVO (been attending since 2005).<br>Good luck, and don’t let your passion fade away because of lack of support from others.<br>


#11

Does your high school have an anime club by any chance?<br><br>Reason I ask this is because usually anime heads are gamers. If there is an anime club at your school make friends with them, join their club and ask them what games they like to play. Then see if they are interested in doing a gaming night or something at one of their meetups. If that goes well, see if they would be interested in doing a tournament event sometime. Make sure all of that goes through the school administration for approval. <br><br>Try that and start there.<br><br>My high school’s anime club used to throw gaming tournaments once a semester. They were a lot of fun and we had fighters, puzzle games, DDR etc. The turnouts were very big since word out got to difference schools. <br>


#12

I really wish I had gone to that school.
My school sucked because being involved with anime club was looked down upon by about 95% of the school. But that’s probably because it was run by the same guys who ran the trading card club and nobody liked them


#13

<blockquote class=“Quote”>
<div class=“QuoteAuthor”><a href="/profile/51983/swafflong">swafflong</a> said:</div>
<div class=“QuoteText”>Hello shoryuken, big question. I’m in high school and have been into fighting games ever since I first watched an EVO stream in 2010. I want to start going to tournaments, but I have a few problems that restrict me. There’s the fact that im in high school. To make it even worse, my mother HATES my gaming habits, claiming I’m obsessed and play too much even though I can only play on fridays and days off from school. In fact, the only person in my family that is interested in fighting games is my older cousin, who sometimes goes to events. But, how can I start going to tournaments and playing competitively in this sitiuation (playin online can be bs at times, which you should already know).

</div>
</blockquote><ol><li>

We can’t tell you to ignore your mom. That’s something you have to decide or try to have a real honest conversation with her. Frame it in terms of alternatives.</li><li>The best way to start playing in tournaments is to… go to tournaments. Make friends. Make good first impressions. Be a cool guy. This could potentially help with 1, if you make friends who aren’t total dickwards.<br></li></ol>


#14

I am going through your same issue right now; matter of fact; they don’t even know how much I play as I play on a monitor in my room; if they ask; I am doing “homework”. My grades are perfect but it will be hard convincing them to take me out 2 hour drives to the main local tournaments as I can’t drive; I can pay my own tournament fee and I may throw out a 'I can pay for gas". My Dad is a computer programmer so he may not care so much, he may even approve of it but my step mom gets mad at me for pretty much every so that will be the key. I wish you the best of luck, I can relate to you completely here. 


#15

Can I suggest against going to your school’s anime club. I hate to be the shallow, judgmental ass here, but you know as well as I do that many people who pick up anime and games have REALLY poor social skills. The fact that you are here asking this critical thinking question shows you’re beyond a lot of the people who do go to game tournaments and anime cons.<div style=“font-weight: normal;”><br></div><div>If you want your life filled with dramatic people go ahead, but I’m 25 years old, gamer since I knew what games are, and I simply can’t imagine trying again to build up a social circle around games. I have friends who play games and friends who don’t, and I feel like if I try to make myself “become” video games then I don’t grow as a person. So yeah, I understand you’re in high school and it’s hard to find people to meet when you have obscure hobbies, but all I suggest is that you don’t give up <b>who you are</b> in the middle of a really developmental part of your life just because you don’t see how you can have geeky hobbies and still live your dreams in the same lifetime. Get to tournaments whenever you are financially and socially independent to do so yourself.</div>


#16

As it’s already been said, schoolwork is above and beyond the first priority and responsibility. Once you can keep that in mind and in practice, just show them you’re responsible enough to attend. If your parents are like how mine were when I first started travelling, let them know that you’ll call them when you guys make a stop for gas/food (if you’re travelling to something 3+ hours away, usually my group and I will stop at around the 90 minute mark for food and to stretch our legs), call them when you get there, and then give them a call either before you go to bed or when you get up in the morning. <br><br>To most people, this seems incredibly controlling and incredibly childish to do, and I can understand where they’re coming from when they say that. However, it gives your parents peace of mind that you’re okay, and that you’re there safe and sound and in good hands. (Provided you travelled/are staying with friends, etc) Usually 1 phone call a day just to stay in touch really quick, let them know what’s up and that you’re fine is what most parents will ask for. 2 calls is the most I’ve made in a day when I’m at a tournament, and that was only at Season’s Beatings last year when I almost beat Infiltration on stream, I was so excited at how well I did (even though I lost) that I still called up my parents and told them, and they were excited to hear the news. Heck, even most parents will just ask for a text when you either get up or sometime during the afternoon instead of a phone call since that’s easier. Just depends on how your parents are. <br><br><br>TL;DR, communication is key. Stay in touch with the parents once or twice a day.They’ll appreciate it and respect you for it. 


#17

Thank you guys all VERY much for your suggestions.
.My school doesn’t have anything like an anime club, but me and my friends are trying to start something like that, btw.