Getting over the hump?


#1

I consider my self to be an above average player. I could beet your average SF player, but I can’t beat a “great” at all…I know that should be a given but I’m trying to step my game up, basically cause I’m kinda frustrated. II just got out of a Chun mirror match on PSN and he did cr. lk 2x cr. lp into ex legs to finish me. that pissed me off, cause I can’t even do Chun’s 2nd hard mode trial! and I can’t seem to crack 75% in my win percentage online… See I usually place well in local tournies, like I ALWAYS seem to get 3rd or 4th place…but I really wanna win some more than I lose some…any advice? -Fritz


#2

you can’t get 3rd or 4th in our local sf4 tourneys:lol:


#3

Practice, Practice, and more Practice. Is all can be done. Also, study how top players play to improve yourself.


#4

The difference between a good and a great competitive gamer of any type, I find, is that a good players spends the match thinking about what he is doing and executing it well. The great player spends most of the match thinking about his opponent and what he is thinking about/about to do. Start trying to read your opponents patters, get into his head and trap him. Watch Justin Wong play, he will almost instantly read an opponent and put them into exactly the type of situation they aren’t equipped to handle, both as a player and as a character.


#5

I would suggest the Domination 101 threads. They’ve helped me out a lot.


#6

Yea i find alot of people saying stuff like this.

On topic
Alot of average people have this problem (including myself) but you gotta go to tournaments to that’s a great part in stepping up anyone’s game. and i think there is a area on this site talking stepping up your game and mind sets. its pretty useful.


#7

I read them, and I understand the concepts of controlling space and stuff. I read them several years ago, several times, back when I was still learning how to play. But right now, I’m stuck in the middle of the road. I think it would help if I explained what I think are my problems as a player.
a) I can’t handle being excessively poked. Like I get raped by characters that have to poke rapidly to win (i.e. Boxer, dictator, etc) if they’re good. If I could keep them at bay, I’m fine, but if they’re good, they’re gonna get in…
b) clutch situations. Not too great in the clutch. That’s when my play gets the most erratic.
c) limited execution. Like I could do the “hard” stuff, but not the “very hard” stuff, like the 2nd challange I mentioned. Like I could do guile’s charge super, but I can’t combo into it, stuff like that
d) I tend to get cocky. This I’ve started to get better at, but I tend to unintentionally play down to my competition. That’s what happened at the gamestop tourney, too (again, 3rd place)…


#8

More importantly, study how YOU play to improve yourself.


#9

a)If they like to poke, start doing reversals, do your pokes first, attacks with lower body invincibility, or use high priority attacks. That should make them think before they do that.

b)This is a big one and it’s not easy, not even for me. In any competition, this is what separates the men from the boys. This is something that has to come with time, skill, reflexes, and dedication. I know when I go clutch because my heart starts pumping like crazy and I know I have to be one step ahead to win. It works sometimes, it doesn’t. Look at baseball in the playoffs, you’d be surprised that even the best players choke up. I don’t even know if it’s genetic.

d)DON’T GET COCKY AT ALL. ALWAYS be wary of your opponent, especially in SFIV, where comebacks are king.

Personally, I’m struggling with the same and I have to keep reminding myself of these constantly. Happy beatdowns! :wgrin:


#10

I’ve found watching replays to be extremely helpful.

Seeing what I did wrong, or going through the match in my head helps me realize where I need to improve.

Also, identify your weaknesses as a player, and practice online in ranked/ player and really focus on those things (ie, I’m really bad at teching throws, so I’m going to make that my focus for a while).


#11

Oh, ya, and try to not fall into patterns that opponents can read easily. I do this too much, and I’m trying to correct it.


#12

Practice isn’t enough. Travel.

Traveling is very important, even one tourney out of your region is great (or even Evo, since all sides of the US are represented partially.) Playing the same people will help nothing. Eventually you will start building a gameplay around your opponent. Even if they pick up new characters it won’t really help. Also playing online if possible can partially help. Don’t take it too seriously but it can still help getting over the hump, especially if you can play top players.