Google DNS/Open DNS


#1

Anyone else try this? And if you have, what are the benefits/consequences of it?

I tried both the Google DNS and Open DNS.

I first tried Google DNS (8.8.8.8/8.8.4.4) and checked my ping. Here are the results:

Automatic DNS: 53ms
Google DNS: 11ms

I then tried using Open DNS settings (208.67.222.222/208.67.220.220) directly applied to my router and here are the comparisons.

Default DNS: 65ms
Open DNS: 5ms

This is honestly a joyous occasion for fighting games online, but again, at what cost? Now that I read up on it, these services can directly detect what you are doing because it relies on sending IP address info to a local server. At least that is what I am getting from the articles. I know an above average amount of information about networking, but I don’t know everything.

Feedback.


#2

Sounds interesting, when the government finally issues the law that forces all ISP to record your usuage on to a database you may aswell make the move. I’m not lucky enough to own to internet connections, if I did I would hook up my gaming connection to this for sure.

Someone somewhere is probably building software to mask you for this too


#3

This is actually… very interesting.
Good find :o


#4

Google dns is more for network testing if I recall. You should never rely on google dns for gaming or actual web surfing


#5

Yeah, I have no idea. I figured just to try it out and see what it’s like. To be honest, I can really tell the difference now that I changed DNS settings.


#6

keep in mind that you now have to travel farther to resolve your DNS requests, depending on where you live. Not to mention if Google DNS goes down for any time, you’d have to go and log into a new DNS server (rather than one just being chosen for you). Oh, and you also have to realize how many OTHER people might be using Google DNS, thus causing it to slow down.

Also keep in mind that the only thing you’re speeding up is your DNS resolution, your ping would still depend on your and your opponents connection when you play games (most games run a sort of P2P when connecting two users). DNS is more for connecting to websites.

I’m reading up on it though, as Google has been pumping money into it since 2009, and it IS an interesting idea. I still have to look into what happens if your opponent (while playing a game) isn’t using Google DNS, and how that would affect you

Still, I’ll stick with my local DNS servers though


#7

My understanding is that a domain name server simply tells your computer what IP is linked to what domain. Having a DNS server that is pinging faster to you shouldn’t make much of a difference in gaming because that information should already be established long before the game actually starts… it’s still not going to change the fact that it takes 120+ms to ping from USWest to USEast, nor is it going to change the routing that such a signal would take.

I’m no networking expert or anything, so I’m probably wrong though.


#8

I tend to think that 98% of the online population has no idea how to manipulate DNS settings or are too afraid to. Even on the highest traffic day, I dont see many people on Google DNS servers.


#9

I thought I just read that the google dns simply figures where you are and links you to the server that is closer. Since there are many mirrored sites then it is suppose to increase responsiveness. I dont think it would help in peer to peer gaming because there is no mirrored site, but I dont see how it could hurt.


#10

No harm no foul, I think.


#11

bingo. All DNS does is matches ip addresses to website names (go to your command prompt and ping www.shoryuken.com to find out the real name of the site).

it has nothing to do with gaming speeds


#12

You can already mask what you do. Get yourself a VPN. This also isn’t really going to do anything for gaming DNS has nothing to do with that at all.

DNS is for websites and how long it takes to resolve them. The "speed boost’ they are hawking here is that odds are you can hit a google DNS faster than another one. Which while cool in some situations, doesn’t actually mean much of anything.

When you’re gaming DNS doesn’t take part in it at all. It’s either a P2P link or a dedicated server. You establish the connection and then it’s the quality of that connection and distance that matters, and there is nothing for DNS to actually resolve.

This also won’t make a difference from streaming movies or downloads.


#13

ah okay thanks for the lesson :tup: