Had a really bad day playing fighters. Feel like hanging up the fight stick


#1

Been playing fighters Seriously now for 3 or 4 years and still a noob. Should be way better than I am. I’ll love fighters but I don’t think I have what it takes to be good. I’m I wasting my time. Didn’t enjoy playing 2night 1 bit. I usually do.


#2

LOL… Hmmm


10 lines…


#3

I mean, what exactly is it you want out of a fighting game? Are you seriously competitive, or are you content with just playing and going at your own pace?

Also, if you usually enjoy playing but had 1 bad day, then that’s the outlier. Why give up something you enjoy over just 1 bad day?


#5

I actually was thinking the same thing myself.

I played Street Farter in 1992, when my friend Billy told me to try the game out. I put my money in, he jumped in and kicked the crap out of me. 30 seconds later the machine was hollering at me: “HURRY! PUT MORE MONEY IN! 9… 8… 7…” Why do that? I left and played pinball and played 45 minutes for $1. For the record, Street Farter is second only to Tekken for my least favorite fighting game, just for that reason.

I learned that it’s better for my wallet and self-esteem to never play against a human opponent. Why do you want your permanent record out there for everyone to see? You walk into a room with a 0-263 record, I guarantee you all the competitive people with small penises will look at you and say “FRESH MEAT!”, because that literally is the only way that competitive players get said appendages to grow. Do you want that?

I do play occasionally but only one player. No permanent record, no antagonists, no comments about how this person slept with your mother, and no bullying. I will be playing SC6, I play DoA5LR, but I learned never ever play two-player under any circumstances.

Also, for the record, that’s not “trolling”. I really do not play two-player and I find I’m not necessarily happier but less miserable because of it. My advice is take time, relax, play a solo game and just ask yourself “Is it worth it?” because the BIllys of the world are not going to change, there’s always going to be people like that out there.


#6

You can play 2-player mode like Double Dragon, Final Fight…


#8

OP, you didn’t give very much detail. Like what do you mean when you say “be good?” What does being good at a fighter mean to you? If you just want to win a lot, then this probably isn’t the multiplayer genre for you.

Throwing away 3-4 years of grinding because of a few bad days is pretty ridiculous. If it’s like almost every time you play you’re not having fun, then something is definitely wrong with your mindset and you need to make some sort of change for sure. I’ve seen people who do nothing but whine constantly for years about how much they suck and claim they are going to quit fighters. I honestly wish they would just quit. I don’t want to see someone spend years of their life doing something they don’t enjoy.

I think some people stick around just for the community, but the community is supposed to be people who love fighters. And some people stick around just to be toxic too. Or maybe they become toxic because they have the wrong attitude, and can’t leave because they feel attached to the community. Whatever the case, there is nothing wrong with taking a little time off to think about what you’re doing wrong and whether or not fighters are worth it to you.


#9

I believe Evolution169 is super on the right track. But said a more sour way.

Everything between your loss, to your next win, to maybe another win Is the game. Every action you take toward learning more about a character you like, and meeting people that play in different ways for better or worse.

Without that, fighting games would be the most shallow genre. I understand people might have more fun playing single player, and they should aim for fun, but personally i cannot imagine playing alone, i would feel isolated.

Winning is not “the” feature in fighting games merely “a” feature that you can earn. And its often not the most important goal. The journey is the goal for me.


#10

Do you focus on just one? I’ve started the grind again after almost 20 years of rarely playing fighting games and I’ve found that focusing on the fundamentals and focusing on a only 1 or 2 games to be helpful. There will always be losses, just make sure you learn from them.


#11

If the pain is great enough that makes you question your own judgment as to what is the value to all of this…then perhaps is best if you walk away. Live happy, keep on gaming with other genres and what have you. You don’t need this and this certainly does not need you.

Fighting games are just games, what makes the game great is your personal enjoyment and if it is not there, then why bother. It’s like playing any sport, you can be casual or you can be competitive, now obviously there are several degrees of being casual and competitive.

Some folks enjoy challenge, no matter what field this might be presented in, be it sports, video games, studies, art, crafts, careers. If you’re a consummate athlete you know that pain is part of the process, not everyone is wired to be such, no shame in that, simply do your best but only do it if it makes you happy. Pain doesn’t make anyone happy, it’s part of the process sure but it is how we take that pain and run with it that divides us.

Personally, I feel I have grown over the years but I was at a standstill for a very long time. Same old grind, same old opponents, all of us at a very average level, no amount of playing changed that. It wasn’t until I started playing online that things changed. It was a rude awakening, lots and lots of losses, of course there were wins but it was only lower tier players that I could take down. What I did notice however is that although I was not doing great online, I was decimating my local opponents to the point they did not want to play with me that much anymore. They accused me of being cheap, dirty, not having a life, all that usual banter that comes from the typical sore losers, that’s when it dawned on me that I was actually getting better.

Patience is a virtua, watching others play also helped tremendously, watching stronger players than myself getting into sticky situations really helped, learned a lot of things I didn’t know about the game. Digging deeper into the mechanics of the game also helped tremendously, something I never bothered with in the past proved to be the best tool of all. Learn your character to the fullest, get familiar with every aspect of your character of choice, once you feel you can handle almost every situation, then perhaps it’s time to look into a next character and so on.

My advice, play Super Street Fighter II Turbo, you’ll find that once you’re proficient at it you can handle any other game. The basics are all there and these apply to almost all of the games, the rest is just systems and mechanics, but the primordial rules of space management are all there. Stick to the JP version as to not get frustrated with the US AI which is brutal, lol. Now is the best time to get into it with the 30th AC, it plays well online and it has all kinds of goodies. The offline arcade mode however uses the US AI so be on your toes!


#12

EXCELLENT advice electricgrave!!!

GoBay77
The only thing I can say is to learn from your losses. Play 5 games then go back to the replays (most games have this feature and PS4 has share play)
Focus on what you did well and what you might have done better.
ALL of the Pros do this. It’s what makes them beasts.
You’re going to lose A LOT before you begin winning consistently, so learning from losses is Crucial.


#13

I do play occasionally but only one player. No permanent record, no antagonists, no comments about how this person slept with your mother, and no bullying. I will be playing SC6, I play DoA5LR, but I learned never ever play two-player under any circumstances.

lol why the hell are you on SRK?


#14

Electricgrave, SPECTERLIGHT, both of your answers are superb.
GoBay77,
I recommend watching tournaments. This will show you the highest level of play and give you insight and hopefully inspiration. It’s easy to find them on twitch and YouTube.
When you see how pro players respond and react, you’ll have a better understanding of the game and ways you might improve.
Myself, I am thoroughly addicted to watching tournaments.
Never give up!


#15

Thanks for the kind words folks. Same goes for both Sepcterlight and Style_Frequency, great advice, watching your own replays definitely helps getting rid off patterns, mannerisms and predictability, if you watch enough of your games you’ll see what I’m talking about. Fightcade is a tremendous tool for this purpose as it records every session you may have. Great tool with a great crowd to work with, plenty of good competition in it.


#16

(post withdrawn by author, will be automatically deleted in 24 hours unless flagged)