Having the right mindset and how to get over ladder anxiety


#1

So this is a problem that has been prevalent with me during my entire time playing competitive games.

Whenever I played any competitive games I’ve gravitated towards ranked play in most of the games that I play due to the fact that It always felt as though people generally exerted more effort and tried harder to win whenever things like points are on the line, but I’ve always had ladder anxiety whenever I played games in which rankings or points of any kind is used to gauge skill in that particular game (Street Fighter, League of Legends, Starcraft, etc…)
**
My questions is what kind of mindset should I have whenever I approach ranked games in Street Fighter 5 (or any other games for that matter)?** I often find myself finding excuses not to play due to my ladder anxiety


#2

The 1st thing about sf is that you need to realize YOU WILL LOSE ALOT. When you thought you have worked hard enough learning the game, there will always be another person who is working harder than you or some gimmicks that you will lose to. Treat ranked as a training progress, whenever you lose look through your video and find out what you are losing to whether it’s your failure to aa properly or some gimmicks that you have not encounter before and hit up the training room till you are sure you can counter the same suitation next time it popped up.

Good luck in your sfv journey, everyone will improve over time so stay and enjoy the learning progress.


#3

You just gotta stop being a pussy and realize that without failure you cannot grow in anything.


#4

You have to learn how to learn or else you will never learn


#5

Real talk, you have to accept that you’re shit at this game and realize that the learning experience is more important. You’ll learn more from losing because your mistakes will be more apparent


#6

Give yourself an excuse to suck, but in a way that helps your overall game. Maybe if you want be less dependent on some move, force yourself to not use it for a few rounds. Or even just switch characters. Obviously your rating will suffer, but after you get to where you can win games with the handicap, then removing it will make you steamroll back to where you were.


#7

You suck, and you’re going to suck for a long time. Deal with it.

And fuck your rank.


#8

Your not going to get better without facing people better than you, I’ve noticed I always play my best against players who are better than me.
Ranked is also a great way to know where you stand.


#9

Your not going to get better without facing people better than you, I’ve noticed I always play my best against players who are better than me.
Ranked is also a great way to know where you stand.


#10

I’m a beginner at Street Fighter and I’ve found the best mindset is really to not think of your points or rank as a precious resource. The points will come quick and easy when you get better at the game. The points represent where you are as a player and you will find they will stabilise around a certain number until you improve, there’s no cheating the system (unless you rage quit and if you do that you are only really cheating yourself). I made a few improvements to my game and I shot up into Super Bronze from Bronze.
Take each game one at a time, if you lose; save the replay and then watch it back some time. Identify why you lost and address it and you’ll find the points come to you.


#11

Coming from other games that have ranked I almost always get this. Most of the time it’s just until I get into a comfortable place where I can grind out enough games. Eventually I get over the anxiety hump of a completely new game but what helps me is finding something I want to improve on and working on that solely.

So if I want to be able to get off jab punishes in matches I will go into a match telling myself to just do it once or twice, whether I win or lose I’ll have accomplished something. Having that singular goal that isn’t “Win” allows you to take your mind off the anxiety of winning or losing.

Also helps develop good habits that will improve your play later when you notice problems in your play.


#12

ranked doesnt mean anything


#13

I always get this kind of anxiety myself. It’s really annoying but in the end you have to tell yourself that it doesn’t matter what your results are, you’re not trying to be a pro.


#14

basically you’re putting to much weight into points…

just play casual for a while, when you lose badly to something, hit the training room and train similiar situations and what counters them (similiar, not necessarily the same being important here)
find more than 1 way to deal with it and
most importantly:
set the dummy to do 2-4 different actions and learn to REACT to the thing that gave you trouble.

bad with anti airs?
Set the dummy to jump in on #1
set it to dash forward throw on #2
set it to fireball on #3
set it to nothing at #4

now train to anti air consistently while defending against the other stuff. You dont have to evade+whiffpunish throw nor jump in/ ex move punish fireballs (yet).

Learn one thing at a time. But learn properly

merely setting the dummy to jump in and anti airing is no task and doesnt help at all.
Everyone can counter a move they see coming a mile away.


#15

I believe that everyone here is on the same page. I used to be the same way when I started out, focused too much on the points than the actual match itself.

Granted I still get a little salty from time to time when I lose a bunch of points online in SFV (albeit my own fault, or lag/ RQ’s) but at that point I usually just take a break, come back and I usually end up higher than when I started.

In the end the points are just imaginary numbers on a screen. I find ranked now to be an alternate training mode for things that I’ve learned in the lab. It’s all about bettering yourself and having fun doing it.


#16

Ranked I think are really good to train yourself to adapt fast. Other than that I feel I improve WAY more in battle lounge so if you have this opportunity with a friend or an online friend who is better than you but not destroying you, use it.


#17

The biggest thing to remember: they’re just points. Who cares?


#18

For each play session I set a goal for myself.

Say I’m learning a new combo in the lab. There’s no use learning a combo and not applying it in a real match. So I just practice at the lab, get a fight request and try to land that combo. And I whiff, and I get punished, and I miss buttons, and etcetera. I get beaten to a pulp. Dozen times. But as soon I start to land the first hit of the combo, I had to undergo several other lessons to land that combo. I’m learning things like footsies, matchups, frames, hurtboxes, hitboxes, gettin’ better at my stick game…

Then, finally I land the combo. And I hit the lab again and do it all over again.

My ultimate goal is to have fun and learn it. It’s like skateboarding, just a past-time/skill and it all comes down to falling and getting hurt.

Let go of the toxic competitive mindset.


#19

I’ve played a lot through a lot of ranked play in different games, and like everyone else has said it really comes down to mindset and the belief that rank points matter.

Generally speaking (assuming the ranked ladders are fair in their estimations of skill), your ranked win/loss ratio will end up pretty even. You’re going to win and you’re going to lose. The point is to learn from the people who beat you, the strategies you fail to overcome and what you can learn from them. Once you realize that inevitably you’re going to lose some games but see losing as way for you to improve, I think that’ll help.

But on a side note, don’t play ranked when you’re salty or on “tilt”, because your head won’t be in the game and you’ll likely make mistakes.


#20

That goes both ways though. If what you’re doing is immediately working you’ll never have to adapt.