Hello Everybody


#1

Hi everyone.
I’m new here to your site. I just found out about this website a few days ago by doing a random search, because a X-Box LIVE friend had talked me into starting to play CvsS 2 again and I hadn’t played in a really long time, so I was trying to do a quick search on some strats and stuff and I came across this awsome, awsome site. I’ve spent about the last 4-5 days reading up on tons and tons of topics in this forum and in the CvsS 2 X-Box LIVE forum, so I feel like I have already known some of you for quite some time already. lol Plus I have watched a lot of CvsS 2 and 3rd Strike videos that have been posted at this site or linked off of youtube from a video that I found posted on this site and I have just been blown away at the performances in those videos. I never knew the SF community was so big, world wide, and this competative. And I never knew of all the combo-potential in CvsS 2 without a EX#-Groove. I know, my skill is terrible compared to you guys, but I hope i’ll be welcome here. I’ve had CvsS 2 since it released for X-Box, but I didn’t play it for that long, maybe about 3-4 months at the most and then I put it down. I’ve played all of the Street Fighter games released on console in the US since the original Street Fighter II released on SNES, with the exceptions of 3rd Strike and the MvsCs, and i’ve always been a big fan of SF, but I guess due to the lack of competition (they closed down all 3 of the arcades inside the 3 malls in my city a few years ago) and my real life friends really not being that interested in playing the SF games seriously, then I never really got to break the game down into detail and in to trying to learn combos and things. So I mostly looked at the SF games to be who could land the most HPs and HKs and HK sweeps and could consistantly perform the characters special/super moves that would come out as the winner, but man after watching all those videos (Majestros’s Guile Tactics v1.0, Daigo Umehara’s Tournament Vids, basically most of the Jap Tournament Vids in general, etc…) and reading intellegent posts by people like Buktooth, Legendary Gokou, Majestros, etc… I can clearly see that my interpretation on the SF games were entirely wrong. I also have learned by reading topics here that people frown a lot on people using the EX#-Groove System for X-Box, because it can really be cheesy and I know that for myself because that’s how I used to win on X-Box LIVE. EX#-Groove was the only way I could really pull out combos. >< So also in the past 4-5 days i’ve really been practicing and trying to find myself liking a real arcade Groove. I know this game is many years old, but I don’t think it’s really ever too late to start somewhere. After finding this site, reading these topics, and watching those videos have really inspired me to learn SF games and to put down the Tekken, Soul Edge/Calibur, and Mortal Kombat. According to alot of you guys the real good players (American and Jap) have been playing SF for years and years, and one day i’d like to become competative in the SF games too. I’m really excited about being here and learning how to play CvsS 2 for real. (^^)


#2

Go to the matchmaking section and try to find some competition in you area. Playing good players is the best way to learn the game.


#3

First of all, welcome to SRK and know that there are lots of people here to help you get better at cvs2.

I guess Xbox Live does get new players into the scene, as proven by your post. I think when I first started playing this game, getting my ass kicked real hard by mid-high level players helped me get the feel for how the game is supposed to be played initially. Then I watched every cvs2 video I can find, whether they be combo videos or match videos. I learned the most from good match videos because it helps you with things like which moves can punish after blocking and or getting hit by certain moves, and what the best/possible combos are for a given situation (how much meter you have, how close to the corner they are, and what groove you’re using at that moment), and tricks and tactics.

I practiced the common combos that are used often for my characters (don’t need to know how to combo with every character you see in a combo video) in training mode, after you’ve gotten the basic mindset for the game on what you’re supposed to do and combos, then you just start learning the nittygritty of the game that help your game as your level goes higher and higher.

$0.02


#4

Well welcome to SRK, and learn how to chair tier with us. The 1st thing you probably want to do if you don’t have one is getting an arcade stick to practice on form the companies MAS or Hori. Watching tourney videos you will commonly see alot of C, A, and K groovers then you have the rare/unique players (Makoto P-groove, Buktooth N-groove, Nuki N-groove) and probably a few others who I can’t think of. S-groove is the shittest groove to play and A-groove is the top groove to play, so the order is probably from best to worst A, C, K, P, N, S.

Once you’ve picked your 3 characters and a groove its best to read up on your characters then watch tourney videos of people playing those characters (watching people with names that aren’t english is usually best way to know that its not scrubs playing). Watch yourself from doing scrub/gimmick moves and avoid those (you’ll read about scrub/gimmick play for each different character in threads usually and as you progress you know yourself what are scrub/gimmick stuff), record or save your matches and upload them and post on the thread, alot of people can tell you what you can work on and what your mistakes are and such. (This is the best way for people to comment on you like crazy of what you should and can be doing) Alot of the people here know their stuff through experience so use the resources you have to your advantage. At 1st you’ll probably get beat and wonder what the hell happened then you learn about Roll Canceling, Frames, Priority, Pokes, etc. After putting in a month of work into practicing your going to see that your game has gotten alot better then before. You can’t get worse you can only get better.

Just because you get beat by someone horribly doesn’t exactly mean that the character it self is better then the ones you have, just means that the person playing the team has more experience then you. Often you may find yourself watching videos of your characters in action by the pros then actually playing to get ideas and tips or what not and then practicing it yourself. When you watch videos don’t pay a lot of attention to combo videos since they are made just to be as flashy as possible, but some of the combos themselves you can pull off in a game. And remember when your playing people if it don’t work once you can try again, if it still doesn’t work… stop and think of something new. Mind games will help you alot in your victories. Good Luck and don’t be afriad to ask questions.

EDIT: heh you beat my post by 1 minute lol.


#5

Thanks guys. =)
I’ve been practicing for about a week so far, learning legit normal combos (not the EX#-Groove stuff) in C and N Grooves (I seem to like those 2 the best right now) so far with my man Guile. I think i’m getting his normal combos down pretty well for the most part, but the combo timing was difficult at first and I still mess up on them sometimes. It’s still incredibly hard for me to cancel his normal combos into his supers, but hopefully with more practice i’ll get it. I posted my team and a couple questions over in the Team Formation: Discussion/Suggestions thread. For right now I only have training mode and the CPU to practice against and is it just me or does the CPU seem psychic? lol I’m having a hard time jumping in or getting close to the CPU to start combos, especially against shotos (even Dan lol), Sagat, Morrigan, and Sakura. And Roll Cancelling doesn’t work in the X-Box CvsS 2 EO version, but I figure the X-Box version will atleast offer sufficient combo practice and getting a better idea of the game. Then when I can hit up an arcade or get my hands on the PS2 version after i’ve got my Groove and Team down pat, then I can get in some practice with RCing.

Is there some websites that I can look into about getting a joystick, CMX?

Thanks.


#6

http://www.massystems.com/ <----MAS System heavy American stick with American arcade button set up.

http://www.play-asia.com/ <-----Hori Arcade Pro not as heavy as the MAS sticks, “clicky” stick with Japanese arcade button set up. Their sticks are back ordered.

If your stick isn’t by either company then it probably won’t last you more then 20 minutes of game play.

EDIT: the CPU consistantly does the same few things over and over, ex. ken does 3 shoryukens, morrigan spams fireballs and dp every jump in, Iori rolls and grab, Ryo and Ryu play counters, etc. just look for the pattern and combo accordingly. A few of the characters don’t really have patterns and can’t get in, thats when you need to learn your game of footsies on the CPU. Also CvS2 EO’s P-groove is different from the arcade/PS2 CvS2


#7

Cool thanks, i’ll definately check into those. Is there one that you would recommend over the other? Or is it just an American/Japanese personal preferance?

lol XD


#8

its personal preferance of which you feel more comfortable with, I myself prefer the Hori (Japanese) sticks because when it comes to “button mashing” you press the buttons really fast where with the MAS stick, just like the arcade you mash by sliding your hand left and right over the buttons. (You can do either style of mashing on the MAS stick) you can’t slide on the Hori stick because their buttons don’t work like that.


#9

if you like guile, go to youtube and search for “nakanishi.” his C-guile is sick and seeing a guile played the right way from the beginning will help you to NOT develop bad habits.

peace.


#10

Actually, srk is known for its stick makers. There are lots of quality stick makers in the Tech Forums and their sticks are top notch. Although most of the recent makers have been making nothing but Japanese sticks, they do make American sticks and other sticks if you ask them to. The only downside on those sticks are that they tend to get expensive, usually priced over 100 bucks for a complete stick.

I personally prefer American and Korean sticks over the Japanese sticks for cvs2. I just can’t play on the Japanese sticks for shit. A good MAS stick with a Perfect360 stick and convex buttons should feel really good. I agree with what CMX said about mashing on Japanese buttons. I’ve gotten so many blisters from mashing on them.

Also, beware of the overall gayness in the language, but also know that it’s all fun and games.


#11

Damn dude, it’s like you were thinking of my stick the whole time you wrote that…

…and what the hell is a Korean stick like?


#12

Besides combos, you should also learn properties of your moves, normals, specials & supers. Things like which moves are fast, which moves have good recovery, which moves have good range, which moves are cancelable, etc.


#13

Hmm, do you mean like…
(We’ll take C-Guile for example, since he’s who I have been pacticing a lot with.)

Pokes:
c.MP, sf.FP, s.MK, c.MK, s.FK.

Anti-Airs:
s.MP, c.FP.

Cross-Up:
j.LK.

Jump-In Combos:
j.LK -> c.LP -> c.LP xx LK Flash Kick.
j.MK -> c.MP xx LK Flash Kick.
j.MK -> c.LP -> s.MP xx Sonic Boom.
j.FP -> s.FP xx Sonic Boom.

Ground Combos:
c.MP xx LK Flash Kick.
c.LP -> c.LP -> s.MP xx Sonic Boom

Super Combos:
(j.MK ->) c.MK xx Lv. 2 Total Wipeout xx Lv. 1 Somersault Strike or LK Flash Kick.

And as for Lv. 3 Sonic Hurricane I think that move seems to come out quick enough that i’ve just been catching people off guard with it on the ground, that are in the process of trying to attack me while on the ground.

I haven’t been over to the Guile Strategy section much, so most of those moves listed above are moves and combos that I have learned from watching videos or I figured out on my own. I hope it’s a pretty good start for the 5 days or so that i’ve spent practicing with him. :wonder: I definately have seen an improvement though over these last 5 days, I can usually pull off the combos about 80% of the time now. :nunchuck:

Did you mean I should learn the properties of the moves and break the moves down like that? Or did you mean something else? :confused:
I’m still kinda new to the game in terms of using a real Arcade Groove, performing legit normal Combos, cancelling legit moves into Supers, etc… Because I was used to EX#-Groove. From reading and learning alot of the abbreviations used on this website I think I got most of the terminology and abbreviations down pretty good. :tup:


#14

You should try replacing the short.flashkick with the roundhouse.flashkick takes a much nicer chunk of health, if you know how to negative edge you can try this combo link into a sonic hurricane - c.jab, c.jab, s.strong xx sonic hurricane or just for sonic hurricane confirms try c.forwards before the super or s.roundhouse into the hurricane (timing is more strick in the roundhouse link I believe, I don’t know how its done yet and can’t do it myself still) But I think how it works is probably you have to hit your s.roundhouse as a meaty to link it, if I’m wrong someone correct me.

After the j.fierce, s.fierce xx sonic boom (fierce) you can link a c.forward for an additional hit probably only while against the wall, I remember seeing this somewhere in these Guile threads, but its probably so outdated that where ever I saw it is not even true unless someone knows for sure it can be done please say so.

I think what FSGamer meant is learn the frames of your moves so you can know what can stuff what better, like who gets stuffed better with your 2 AA options so you know which one has better priority against certain characters.


#15

Knowing frame data is helpful but it isn’t necessarily a requirement to be good at the game.
What I meant by knowing properties of moves is knowking all the uses for all your moves (eg: combo starters, whiff punishers, AAs, poking moves, footsie moves, etc)

Add c.LP to that list. It comes out fast, it’s a good combo starter, hitconfirmable. c.LK is good too. I don’t really use s.HP or s.MK as pokes. Close s.HP is a laggy move if it gets blocked. Far s.HP can be crouched by most characters. s.MK is an akward move to use if you’re trying to keep your charge.

RC Sonic Boom is also a good AA. Also, in some situations you can jump up/back and do a j.HK.

j.LK is a decent starter in situations such as after a knockdown since it’s a cross-up. j.HP is the starter you use when you anticipate an opponent’s move and jump over it or when they’re dizzy. There’s really not much point in using other jumping attacks as starters.
For finishers, lvl 2 Total Wipeout xx HK Flash Kick when you have meter; HK Flash Kick when you don’t. Both options knock down and put you in advantage. Using Sonic Booms in the end works better in block strings.
For ground combos, c.LP(2x) x HK Flash Kick is your standard no-meter combo. Hitconfirmable, good damage and knocks down. c.LP(2x) > s.LK xx lvl 2 Total Wipeout xx HK Flash Kick is your combo of choice when you do have meter.

Try to find match videos with John Choi & Nakanishi, they’re both really good Guile players. Also, I have full frame data for Guile on my website.


#16

I would like to know also. My Hori Tekken Stick is not that good in my opinion. But to each his own.


#17

I don’t know but for some reason the Hori Tekken Stick compared to Hori Arcade Pros seems to differ by far for some reason. I’ve played with both and I have better execution on the Hori Arcade Pro then the Hori Tekken for some strange reason, its like Tekken just asked for the copyright to use they’re stick style and paid to have “Hori” on their stick just to make that extra $$$.

FSGamer - hey I don’t know how to read frames yet either lol. But when I play against people who compete in tourneys I really should learn those frames.


#18

http://www.video-opera.com/features/f0009.php


#19

Thanks I’ll add that to my favorites and read it when I’m not lazy and care about frames for once lol.


#20

I didn’t thinking Leezy was asking a serious question when he asked that. Maybe I was wrong.

A Korean stick is like an American stick in terms of appearances, but smaller. The knobs are battops and it’s about 30% smaller than Happ sticks, and Korean sticks rotate in a smooth circular motion. They use microswitches and have a rubber pad inside to bring the stick back to neutral as opposed to a spring like all the other sticks in the world. They have a pretty small throw and you don’t need too much effort to get moves out, unless your stick has a hella stiff rubber pad.

I’d say whether you are used to American sticks or Japanese sticks, Korean sticks don’t take much to get used to and play well. I know Jesse and wepeel said they like my Korean sticks, and I know Mishimaster from Japan played fine on Korean sticks when he visited Korea last year for Tekken.