Help me finish my Sega HSS-0130 PS4 mod (please)!


#1

Hello people,

I’ve minimum experience modding sticks (only previous swapped out stock sticks for Sanwa JLF’s and replaced buttons) but yesterday I began modding my long-held Sega Virtua Stick Pro (HSS-0130) to make it PS4-compatible. Pad hacks sounded too complicated due to soldering (although I am willing to try).

I cannibalised the PCBs from a Venom Arcade Stick and it all went about 90% fine, although I’m left with a couple of buttons I’m unsure about how to wire/connect to my standard Sanwa snap-in buttons (OBSF-24 and OBSF-30s). The problem is that they’re not connected/activated in the Venom stick in the same way most other buttons are (two wires coming from a 30mm arcade-like button). The Venom SHARE and OPTIONS buttons are on a separate mini PCB within the Venom stick and activated by small rubberised buttons. I’m not sure how I’d mod/translate this action so I could connect and activate it via a Sanwa two-wired OBSF-24 button.

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/324757/001.jpg

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/324757/002.jpg

I’ve currently got the PS Home button connected to the far-right 24mm Sanwa button but don’t think I’d need this usually on the PS4; once in-game I’d be using OPTIONS (Start button in effect) and the SHARE button potentially.

The two 24mm buttons on the top of my Sega 1L7B panel are what I want to activate SHARE and OPTIONS, so am I able to wire this up internally or do I need to poke the mini PCB out the back of the HSS-0130 body and activate some other way (in which case the pre-cut cable holes don’t appear large enough for the ribbon cable to come through)?

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/324757/003.jpg

Final question I’d have is if I needed to extend one of the wires from one of the standard Venom buttons (the L2, bottom-right) because it didn’t stretch to another button, then would you usually replace the wire/metal connectors for a longer wire (in which case, what type should I buy?), or are there extender wires you can get for internal button wiring jobs? I was thinking in case I wanted/needed to connect L2 to the far-left 24mm button to the left of the Sanwa JLF stick (for whatever reason); it doesn’t reach currently.

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/324757/004.jpg

The mod mostly works at the moment; directions fine and the main PS4 buttons (cross, circle, square, triangle, R1, L1, R2).

I also filmed a poorly-shot time lapse video of the mod here (again, first time trying and didn’t do a great job of it):
https://youtu.be/XaFiL7UWfac

Thanks for any help :slight_smile:


#2

Use a multimeter to figure out which pins on the daughter board are the signals you want and which are their grounds. Solder wires long enough to comfortably reach your share/home buttons to the signal pins, then do the same for the ground wires. Do the same with the corresponding grounds (you could get away with grounding a simpler way if it’s all shared, but nevermind that for simplicity’s sake at the moment. There are other ways you could accomplish this once you get the concept (splicing into the ribbon cable, tapping the spots directly on the main board), this is just the simplest way to explain it.

Edit: the top blue ring on the “xbox” contact should be green. All the upper contacts are ground there.


#3

Thanks a lot @PresidentCamacho for the reply. What type of wires do I need (are there differences in amperage), and why the red lines to those specific points on your edited photo?


#4

You don’t need to get into amperage here, your controller’s PCB operates in the milliamp range, and the wiring is not going to burn out for the amount of power being used in the controller.

Stranded wire is preferable, anywhere between 22 to 28 gauge, preferably 24 or 26 gauge.
And lower a number is the thicker it becomes, and higher the number the thinner it becomes.
lower than 22 gauge and the wire gets too thick to solder easily with, and 30 and 32 gauge wire is hard to strip the wire and it becomes easy to break.

The red lines is where Camacho is showing you want button pad corresponds to what solder point for the PCB and ribbon cable.


#5

Sorry; I’m still not sure how many points I need to solder (and to what). So for SHARE/MACRO for example, I need two wires initially; each end of either wire connecting to the metal pins underneath each Sanwa OBSF-24 button and the other ends soldered to what? The top green circle area and the bottom blue circle area? Do I then need more wire to connect the bottom blue connector to the small metal pin at the bottom?

Thanks with your patience with this; I haven’t a clue (obviously) :s


#6

You would need to solder to 4 points, 1 for each wire that the buttons you want to connect need. I can’t tell which of the pins are ground for those specific buttons, you’ll need to look closely at the board to trace them back like I did with the red lines. The grounds are probably all shared anyways (meaning your ground lines could be connected to any ground point rather than the one specifically tied to that contact pad), you can use a multimeter to test for continuity to find out.

Soldering directly to the contact pads is also an option, but beware that the original buttons are unlikely to function correctly due to solder blobs being there if that route is taken…


#7

Thanks again @PresidentCamacho. I haven’t a multimeter at the moment; would I need one to test or realistically could I connect to the PS4 and manually connect the wire endpoints to see if the signal carries (or do I risk blowing the PCB up that way, etc)?


#8

Here are the four wire you need.

http://i922.photobucket.com/albums/ad66/jdm714_bucket/Diagrams/Venom_Solder_zpst8ng8omu.png~original

Solder to those pads.
Wire length as long as you need.
Connect each pair of wire to each button.
Doesn’t matter which wire within the pair goes to which pin on Sanwa.


#9

@jdm714 Thanks a lot!!!


#10

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/324757/005.jpg

Thanks once again to everyone (@jdm714, @PresidentCamacho and @Darksakul); soldering done and everything works! Soldering was trickier than expected but it’s a good 20 years since I tried it last :D.