Help needed wiring FightStick SE (360) for project boxes!


#1

A buddy of mine had a great idea for modding my SE Fightstick 360 to work with other consoles, but I have no idea how to actually wire it up (I was hoping you guys could help me out with that). The idea is to connect the buttons and joystick in the arcade stick to a parallel port or d-sub connector of some kind, and then have the female connector hanging out of the stick. Then, if I wanted the stick to work on Dreamcast, I could just take a Dreamcast controller and turn it into an adapter by wiring a male connector to the PCB that would plug into the female port on the SE FightStick. That way, the Dreamcast controller would be receiving inputs from the Fightstick instead of it’s own buttons, and since no converting is going on there would be zero lag. Is this a viable solution?

If anyone could point me towards instructions on how to wire that up and what parts I would need I’d GREATLY appreciate it! I’ve never done anything like this before. I know how to solder, but that’s about it.


#2

this is generally called a project box setup(or something like that).

There are no set instructions on how to do this. No one set the standards

i’d suggest using db-25 connectors (people have argued for db-15 for those that like 6 button setups and want to make a connector for neogeo).

heres a general guide http://home.comcast.net/~jdpyle1/controls.htm


#3

Thanks for the help Twinniss. I’m a little confused about how to wire to the DB-25, as the buttons and joystick are already wired with quick-disconnects:

Where would I wire the DB-25 to?


#4

I’ve been doing research, and apparently I’m going to want to wire from the buttons to a terminal strip (which will then run each button signal to both the 360 PCB and the DB25 connector. My confusion comes in with the connection to the 360 PCB; the wires are going to the black terminal on the lower left, then going to the 360 PCB with what appears to be ribbon cable. Also, it appears that each button is running a ground wire straight to that black terminal (in all of the tutorials I’ve read, the buttons are daisy-chained with a ground wire before going to the PCB). If someone could walk me through this process I’d greatly appreciate it! I’ve never done anything like this before, but I’m a quick learner and I do know how to solder.

Edit: I’d also like to protect the PCB’s from getting fried in case someone plugs my stick into multiple consoles at once. Is there some sort of diode I could install that would protect the PCB’s from getting overloaded?


#5

I might suggest that if you plan on going the Project box route, you could just gut the madcatz default pcb in the stick and wire that in a project box just like other systems controllers. That way you wouldn’t have to worry about multiple consoles being plugged in. Lots more work soldering the 25 pin connector though.

Edit: I didn’t take into account but the Madcats stick may not be common ground, in that case you should get a retro arcade madcatz stick and use that in a project box. The ribbon cables to the buttons, hmmnnn. That’s a tough one.

I suggest that you make an excel spreadsheet or use open office to help you keep track when making project boxes.

I was thinking of going the Cthulhu route, but one of my most played systems is the dreamcast. I like having access to the memory card.


#6

You should track down an Innovation PSX/Saturn-to-Dreamcast adapter. They have a built in port for the VMU and would allow you to use the MC Cthulhu on Dreamcast. The only reason I haven’t committed to the MC Cthulhu yet is the lack of Sega Genesis support. I still play my Genesis/32X/Sega CD, and would love to play it with an arcade quality stick.