How come the moon doesn't lift me?


#1

Waves in the ocean lift up and down due to the moon’s gravity, right?

So how come that doesn’t happen to me, or other inanimate objects?


#2

:slight_smile:

:expressionless:

:frowning:


#3

Doesn’t happen to you because you’re a fatass.

Fatty. Cut back on the Mickey D’s.


#4

Are you smiling at the prospect of the moon lifting me and dropping me at terminal velocity or something?


#5

You know I actually hear people call McDonalds McDicks these days. smh


#6

No, but I am at myself.

Does anyone else notice how quoting my smilies they’ve magically turned into Asians.


#7

First of all, I don’t eat at McDonalds.

Secondly, I’m quite certain that the amount of ocean water lifted by the moon at any given location has greater mass than any person could hope to acquire.


#8

Is this a physics fail or trolling fail?


#9

BK fan then?


#10

Don’t worry beGuiled! The moon is actually lifting you!


#11

:rofl:


#12

Save us, Lord Sagan.


#13

You haven’t figured out the ol’ cl_moon_lift 1 command in the fucking console?


#14

I’m actually asking here because I don’t want to make a fool of myself in that Physical Science class. And since everybody here doesn’t like me, I got nothing to lose.


#15

Water is a fluid. While our oceans are will firmly within our earth’s gravity well it is still affected by the gravity of the moon. The reason it causes tides is because as the moon revolves around us it pulls on masses in general. It also has a lot to do with wind and other earthly forces. However, all of these forces are maintained within our gravity well because we’re standing on top of the fucking earth and if you looked up even one equation on gravity this should make sense.


#16

The moon IS lifting you, and were you to stand on the moon, the earth would be lifting you as well.

The basic equation for the attraction between two objects is http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravitational_acceleration

The further away an object is, the less effect it has, attraction wise, on you. (Unless you’re involved with an internet relationship /joke)
As the moon rotates around the earth, the distance between the water and the moon is constantly varying, (though in a cycle, not erratically) causing it to have a different amount of ‘pull’ on the water.

It’s more noticeable in the ocean than other things because it is cyclic, and water is fluid, allowing it to change shape much more easily. Also due to the size of the ocean, and the fact that it covers most of the earth’s surface.

Interesting reading:


#17

Are you really an inanimate object?


#18

Holy shit I can’t believe I missed that. Good eye, Bobbypigo.


#19

It all…

…makes sense now.

Disclaimer - Would have to have seen the episode to understand.


#20

oh yeah! :cool: