How do I train myself to stop jumping?


#1

Any solid tips on this? I actually play a pretty solid ground game when I can convince myself that jumping at a standing Ryu isn’t a good idea but for some reason I just feel COMPELLED to jump right into those dragon punches. I feel like it’s one o the worst habits I have as a players, but I’m not sure how to curb said habit. Any ideas fellas?


#2

Play someone who anti-airs you consistently. Either you’ll stop jumping… or you’ll lose.

Find ways to beat fireball traps besides jumping. Neutral jumping or focusing a fireball is fine.

Learn how to use all your grounded pokes and how to play a neutral game. If you’re jumping all the time, your ground game is probably the reason why.


#3

I think my main problem is that I get impatient trying to open up people who have solid blocks at mid range. I need to develop a sense of patience I suppose, though exactly how one goes about that is beyond me at present.


#4

Play more Jackie Chan fist of fire. :cool:

jumps are terrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrible in that game~! :o


#5

I just played a BR who would constantly anti air my jumps, also spam fireballs with sagat, and when I started turtling he’d do attacks that you must block standing, after many matches I started attempting to read what he was going to do and blocked most of his attacks. I managed to bring him down to 30% health from there on but never knocked him out. I suck but feel accomplished that I stopped jumping for good.


#6

It’s difficult to change your natural instincts to jump at your opponent, but the greatest teacher you’ll encounter, is failure. Keep jumping at a decent opponent who knows how to anti-air, and you’ll quickly learn to stop jumping recklessly.

Jumping is, and always has been, a high-risk high-reward move. A lot of people tend to confuse aggression and rushdown, with stupidity and a LOT of reckless jumps and moves.

Limit yourself to 2 jumps per round. It’s going to take some willpower and it won’t be easy. You can neutral jump all day long, but limit yourself to only 2 forward jumps a round. This will do wonders for your ground game, since you’ll have to rely on it heavily in order to do damage. You’ll most likely lose several matches, but that isn’t the point, the point is to train you to resist these noobish urges to commit to bad jump attacks.

If you want, you can do it Pavlov-style, and have a friend punch you in the arm whenever you jump more than you’re allowed.


#7

Stop holding upback/up/upforward.
Instead just focus on what your character(s) can do on the ground.


#8

if you are playing with an arcade stick you can get a copy of SF4 for the PC and when programming the stick don’t assign a direction to “up” and spend an hour a day training on that. Or there is the rubberband/thumbtack on a band-aid trick. Put a rubberband on your wrist or a thumbtack through a band-aid with the point sticking out and put the band-aid on your finger. Every time you jump when you shouldn’t snap the rubberband on your wrist or stab yourself in the gut with the thumbtack. If the pain of getting anti-aired isn’t enough to teach you then maybe real pain will :wink:


#9

walk forward more. get rid of pony avatar.


#10

This is simple, as Kikuichimonji said, just play someone who will consistently be anti-airing you. This is how I stopped my friend from jumping all over the place. I swear she jumps every single time even when it’s unsafe.


#11

You might not have to, it might actually work for you, which is why you might be doing it in the 1st place. Test your opponent, if he lets you jump on him, then have at it!


#12

Don’t be scared of ground game. Embrace ground game.


#13

Do you have a general problem with impulse control? Completely serious question.


#14

Try to get into a game with someone of your general skill (doesn’t need to be some expert at anti-airing) and try to go rounds where you just don’t allow yourself to jump. Go into training mode and put a dummy on all block and just walk forward and push buttons on them - how many blocked hits can you get before they are pushed too far away. Once they are safely pushed away how do you close that distance?

Do you have any normals that cover ground? (Cody, DeeJay, Rose, Dhalsim, Blanka, Dictator, Claw, and others have a slide normal, some better than others of course)

Do you have any normals that are great anti-airs? Part of the trick of learning to not jump it to understand how easily a bad jump can get shut down, if you concentrate on improving your own anti-air game you will in turn learn how to spot your own bad jump ins. If you’re jumping in without a plan in place then you are probably just jump to cover distance and get some “easy damage”, after a certain level of skill everyone knows the BIG damage comes from jump-ins and so it’s usually one of the first things they really start practicing against.

There is no trick other than to play rounds without jumping, or like eltrouble said, limit yourself to 2 jumps or something of the sort per round.


#15

Uhh…I’m not sure?


#16

Crouch

In all seriousness if you can, when playing a match if you jump ask yourself if you really needed to. Then try and limit your jumping.


#17

I would just work on footsies, hit confirms and pokes.

Make a point to not jump for a couple rounds just to see what you tend to do. Watch what the opponent does and go from there.


#18

Programming your stick to not register up is actually a pretty good strategy I have found out, and I have practiced online with it. I play Gief so not being able to SPD normally really challenges you to use your footsies as opposed to just abusing people who don’t hold up on defense and 50/50ing them all day.


#19

I’m going to say the exact opposite, if you program your stick to not have an Up then you are training yourself to be sloppy with those inputs. It might help in the short term but god help you if you develop any muscle memory based on your stick not registering up.


#20

How does me not being able to actually input an SPD make me sloppy with inputs? Tell me, when you watch videos of top players can you tell if their inputs were sloppy or precise when they hit combos?