How do you even manage to play with a STICK?


#1

Ok, reading the forums, ive seen alot of poeple saying that poeple will gradualy become alot better when going from pad to stick.

This is not true… not true at all!

Ive got my first stick, played with it for about 72 hours, and no improvement even after practicing doing the motions. At all…

My stick is a square route and has 6 buttons. not 8. This is simple and a noob stick. So it should be good for me. But no, its not simple. Its so much harder and makes me want to throw my stick onto the screen…

Looking at how other poeple playing with the stick and mabe trying diffrent positions. I found my self holding it between the pinky and the ring finger was the most comfortable. However, i cant manage to dash when i want to, sometimes when i want to do a DP motion, nothing comes out, but after a dash or automaticly, it comes out by it self.

Fast motions like Super jump + Burn kick doesnt come out. Only a super jump and the kick button you did. I even tryed delaying the burn kick by alot in both 1p and 2p sides and NOTHING COMES OUT!

After trying to do these motions by so many times, i feel like im starting to ruining the stick.

Who ever says converting from pad to stick for the first time will improve your play style is WRONG. I feel like i havent improved at all with the stick from Day 1, to the end of Day 3.
*
Really, guys… replying because of the 3 days issue? And with what? Simply put it in hours because im not talking about playing with a stick for 1 second one time a day for 3 days -.-*

Please, give me advice in any way that will help me get better with the stick with ease.

Its like watching a bad match instead of playing a match. Because everything i do is not my intentions. Some times i couldnt even block because apperently, my stick was too low for my Char to be standing and blocking.


#2

you just have to get use to it really. it takes more then just 3 days to get use to a stick if you have never used one.


#3

I think that it has been discussed at length in the past. The transition from pad to stick is a painful 2 week minimum process. Typically it takes 1 to 2 months to adjust. You just have to do repetitions. I suggest training and trials.

How do I manage to play with a stick? Well when Street Fighter 2 The World warrior came out, arcade sticks where the only things that they offered on an arcade cabinet. I went through the opposite same thing when it came out on SNES learning to play Street Fighter 2 on a SNES pad. In 2 weeks to a month, I was throwing fireballs and dragon punches and doing standing fierce flash kicks as well on a pad as I did on a stick.


#4

It took me 2 months to get used to a stick. It was long but totally worth it.

You did read this right?
http://shoryuken.com/f322/srk-newbie-saikyo-dojo-arcade-stick-faq-read-before-asking-questions-231888/


#5

I feel this way works best, it worked well for me during my transition and people who have tried it have said it’s worked well for them…

I assume you’re playing SSF4. What you should do is put the game into training mode, turn on input display so you can tell where you’re going wrong and then completely ignore the game. Watch a movie or browse the internet or something, assuming you can see your TV from your computer.

While you’re pre occupied with something else just practice the motions for moves and combos, keep doing this for maybe 1 or 2 hours a day. Obviously you will need to pay some attention to the game but I think it’s better if your mind is occupied with something else too. This way it will become subconscious and you won’t have to think about how to pull off moves because it’s all in the back of your mind and you can just do them.

It took me around a month to get as good on stick as I was on pad. It only really took a few days to be able to play the game properly though. After the first month my execution on stick surpassed what I was able to do on pad.

I was also playing Tekken at the time I transitioned to stick, and I think trying to pull off EWGF on stick helped too because you have to be pretty precise, so maybe you should try to maybe play some Tekken or ST or any game that has a higher execution barrier so you can polish your execution.

And another thing, try to play some non-fighters with the stick. Shmups help a lot because they require a lot of stick movement to dodge bullets etc. Get hold of MAME and try out a bunch of different games.

TL;DR
Practice, the more you do something the better you will become.


#6

I stopped reading there. As someone who has literally just switched from pad to stick, I can assure you there is no easy way to adjust. Remember that comfort is the key. If you repeat a motion a few times and it starts to hurt, then I suggest you practice another one until you find that sweet spot. Try to be aware of your finger, risk and arm movements when you practice to find out which position yields the best results. But seriously if you decide that stick isn’t for you, well no one is forcing you to use it. Go with what you feel is best suited to your abilities.


#7

http://img696.imageshack.us/img696/6733/reactionfaces.gif


#8

Im sorry for making some poeple post stupid time wastefull stuff… read it again and understand it NOW… ?

Thanks alot KaosMIDIProphet!

Oh and Joutai, It only says of what converting to stick will mean and do. And not helping me get better with it.

But, to the rest of the replies… 2 Months? Ive been dying trying to do anything in practice mode. And tried Online when i think i got a bit of it. But no, so i went back to practice mode in most of my time in ssf4. Its Not doing me any good ever sense i stopped playing online for the time of playing on practice mode to adjust my self.

Trying to do it fast, comfortably. Even without thinking and do it however it feels. It just irritates me and doesnt give me hints on what im doing wrong when the input display clearly shows a perfectly set motion and press…


#9

it takes about a month. it really makes you wonder how arcades ever made money with these things though.

im good with a stick(its all i use), but im able to admit, they arent as accurate as other methods… theyre just better than pads (mostly because of the buttons on the right)

theres about a million reasons why sticks(i mean the stick its self, the buttons are good) dont make sense from a logistical standpoint, but if you actually want accuracy get or make a hitbox.


#10

if you are serious, give it time like any thing else. its not supposed to be easy at first, even many months/years later on. IF you were to give a reg xbox controller to someone who has never played before, I am sure that would take more than 3 days of getting used to


#11

Your immediate problems may not be with the stick more so than with some misunderstanding of how to execute the moves and the games input mechanics (negative-edge, SRK shortcuts, etc.), but we won’t know for sure unless we know exactly what moves you are having trouble with.

So what are you having trouble with? Is it quarter-circle motions? 2x QCF motions? Delaying the last light normal in your hit-confirm combo so that it links rather than chains, allowing you to cancel it into a special?


#12

When you’re first starting out with the stick you don’t need to do inputs as fast as you can, just focus on getting the motion down and complete instead of doing it quickly and half-assed. Quick and efficient inputs will come naturally. Don’t expect yourself to get used to something in 3 days, either, be more reasonable in expectations and set realistic goals for yourself.

also listen to fokkusuhaundo


#13

@Crafter, did you get that thing I sent you? :stuck_out_tongue:


#14

Don’t do it fast when you are starting out.

Slow is fast.

When learning initially do it slow. Trying to do it fast right away will lead to sloppy execution. It is like learning to dance. For beginners to a routine, choreographers will often do the motions slowly to ensure the dancers have proper form and posture instead of blowing through the number ungracefully sloppy.

For joystick motions ensuring that you hit your inputs cleanly and consistently is important because you need to develop your hand posture. As you get better and cleaner with your motions, then you can start to gradually speed up your motions. Speeding up when your hand gestures are still sloppy and not consistent will lead to failed executions and dropped combos.

I still have to do this when picking up new characters.


#15

Richard i sent u a PM.


#16

I’m assuming you didn’t grow up in the arcade era, which is a shame. Even though I did however, when I moved back to stick after not having used one for a few years it took a while to get the hang of it again. As others have said, a few days isn’t enough, keep at it and I think you’ll find you start to improve. A lot of people focus on the left hand when learning to use a stick, but don’t forget to focus on the right hand too, it’s probably more complicated in some ways, 6 (or 8 in some cases) buttons and only 5 fingers. How you approach this is kinda up to you (just like with the left hand) however if you look around the interwebs (and quite possibly this site) you’ll find information on both left and right hand usage with regards to arcade sticks.


#17

I use pad by choice.

Stick is alright. I can use a stick pretty proficiently, but I like the rotation of the Fightpad. Its more fluent IMO.

It took me about 2 months to get decent with a stick. But pad is just better for me.

dont believe the hype, if you want to use pad over stick, then use pad.

Im not very good, but pad is good for me.

the bad thing about the fightpad is that it is less durable than the stick. However I only bought 2 fightpads in one year. One for the 360 and one for the PS3


#18

I’ve said it before but;

You’ll play terribly for a week.
Suck for a fortnight.
And only start getting back to where you where after that.
By the month mark, you should be better than you were before hand and you can start learning advanced input methods.

Three days isn’t even enough to learn how you’re comfortable holding the damned stick. Keep practicing and you’ll get better. Slowly.