How forceful on the joystick are experienced players?


#1

I’ve only just recently been putting effort into fighting games as I purchased an Xbox and a couple sticks to play Cave shooters. While playing the shooters I’m quite delicate with the stick, but while training in KoFXIII I’m finding that I need to exert a lot of speed and force to execute many of the combos I’m attempting.

I’m kind of ocd regarding my sticks, should I be slamming the lever around or not? I don’t want to wear them out through unecessary force.

I don’t know anyone who plays these games so I’m asking here in the newbie forum because I am a newbie and this is probably a newb question.

Thanks for reading


#2

depends on the player, but those with good execution tend to be more delicate and efficient with their motions and button presses. that’ll come with time and experience though, knowing exactly how much force to exert to get what you’re trying to execute.

if your stick is japanese (i.e. sanwa/seimitsu stick/buttons) they are made to withstand quite a bit of abuse so don’t worry about that.


#3

dont worry about abusing the sticks… they are arcade parts assuming that you have madcatz. im pretty hard on my sticks though nowhere near someone that just bangs on them with little rhyme or reason. ive had my sticks for years and have yet to have so much as a button go out… and theyve been to many tournies and had many players use them.

as far as how much force to use its as little as you feel comfortable with using. some pros are VERY precise and move the sticks little… some wail on them like a 1 year old… its all preference. if you find that you need more speed to get certain motions out, well thats what you gotta do. vangief can standing 720 on pad… i can barely 360 on pad. on a stick theres no way i can do a standing 720… i’d imagine van has to be very fast in order to be able to do it. point i that different people have different skillsets. see how you are most comfortable using the sticks and tailor your character choices and strategies to that. people that cant do instant burn kick mixups dont use viper, people that cant/have problems doing 360’s dont use grapplers… etc etc.

-dime


#4

This might be a dumb question, but are Madcatz using literally Japanese parts or similar? Is there a difference?


#5

This is pretty much the same with anything that requires good execution; the better you are the less effort you are going to use to do what you want to do. Great bass players know just how much they need to push a string to avoid fret buzz, great basketball players are much more fluid in their motions, etc. etc.


#6

I guess if you were more gentle on the parts, it would technically last longer, since it’s under less stress. But overall, if it helps your execution to slam the sticks and buttons around, do it. Parts can always be replaced, and buttons are pretty cheap to replace. Also, these parts are designed for heavy use, so don’t worry too much about it. Focus on your execution instead.

Over time, you might develop a certain comfort level with your stick, to the point where you no longer have to make the motions so hard, but for now, just do what feels comfortable for you.

They literally use japanese parts, not knock-offs, or “Mad Catz” brand equipment. They are all using standard Sanwas that many arcades and arcade sticks are using now.

Of course, if you want, you can swap in different parts if you’re not a fan of Sanwa.


#7

Thanks guys, I may as well just play whichever way is most effective for me. The hardware is meant to be used and the parts can be replaced should I ever feel the need some day down the line.
I have a HRAP VX-SA and EX-SE btw


#8

From what I’ve heard, some high level players don’t force the stick around and ride the gate specifically to input things faster.


#9

a light touch develops over time. Assuming you drive, remember when you first learned to drive how hard you held the steering wheel? And now after a few years how you casually have one hand on it now? It is kind of like that.


#10

I’m probably a bit rougher than average. I still have a bunch of lingering old American arcade parts muscle memory.

To give you an idea, I’ve had my current stick since '07. I’m still using the same Joystick, though I replaced the stick PCB once (IE the microswitches). I also swapped all the buttons out, but it was more due to wanting a change of color than the buttons actually going out on me.

Unless you do something really brutal to your stick, you shouldn’t wear it out anytime soon.


#11

Some high players do force the stick around, but for the most part, experience teaches you to use lighter and quicker motions.

And riding the gate is never a good idea, it slows down your inputs, leads to imprecise motions.