How much training, etc


#1

Hello everyone, I’m curious about a couple of things and wanted to get an idea on a couple other things too. I’ll put them in questions so if anyone can reply I’d appreciate it.

  1. For pro players in fighting games, what’s the average time they play/practice a day? I’m talking about guys who consistently enter tournaments like evo an others? Daigo,momochi,wong,sonicfox,etc.

  2. Do these guys play other type of games or just fighting games? Like do they also play cod,fallout.etc?

  3. How much practice/play do you guys do a day?


#2

Moved to the newbie dojo.


#3
  1. Pro players play for a living, it’s their job. So most likely they have play sessions over 8 hours, even 10 hours a day researching, training combos, running sets and taking notes. They’re sponsored, so they must win to pay the bills. That being said they have the fitting situation to make a living out of it.

  2. Maybe, can’t really tell. But they can’t be as good in other games as a fighting game.

  3. I work 9 to 5, go to college at night and I’m a commuter. I get up at 5 a.m. and go to sleep at 2 a.m. on weekdays. I play at least 10 hours a week.


#4

Thanks for replying. Yea I figured they play at least 4 hours a day but you’re right I think it’s much more than that. That’s the reason the same guys are always in the finals and top players at tournaments, an average player that doesn’t do that for a living is against a lot if they plan on challenging them, that’s why I recommend people to have fun and don’t worry about losing over and over and over, all top guys also lost (and keep losing) over and over and over the only difference is that they train/play for hours and while its true that some people are more talented in fighting games, it’s also true that practice makes perfect. And you play 10 hrs. a week even with your busy schedule? That’s cool man.


#5

I’m pretty sure most pro players have jobs. I can’t imagine someone like Ricky Ortiz or NuckleDu making 40k-60k a year by playing games, but correct me if I’m wrong.


#6

I imagine most play for a living, maybe not all is what I think, being sponsored eliminates 99% of other players that have a full time job, even with a job if they’re pro then they still train much much more than a regular player. I read that Daigo trains about 8 hours a day, “8 hours a day” and this is coming from him in an interview. And he’s not the only pro that trains this much. I imagine being sponsored means that instead of watching a movie most times you’re training, I mean they love this and it’s awesome how they go about their art. Again I just read that about Daigo but wanted to get an idea, how much do you play on average?


#7

i work a 9-5 job, do workouts, usually i play for like 2-3 hours and leave 1 hour to watch my replays before zzz. It’s been 3 weeks since i bought the game and i barely scratched the surface, i can’t even win against scrubby tactics (jump ins, wake up supers, wake DPs, dropping combos, doing unsafe moves…etc etc etc). If you are new to fighting games, get ready to sink in alot of hours to get the basics right, then even more for the advanced tactics.


#8

Many pro players practice quite a bit considering it’s an integral part of their lives. It pays for a lot of what they do, and while they’re sometimes sponsored, it doesn’t cover every expense they need to make to have a standard living.
I don’t know much about whether other pro players, play other video games, but I know JWong, for a while now, picks up literal anime games like DBZ: Xenoverse and Naruto and plays through them on stream. I think he uploads it on youtube?
I’m still a student, so practicing for me is, unfortunately, very limited. I play at least 4 hours a week, which isn’t actually much at all. I don’t know much about SFV, but I was able to practice a lot more during SFIV:AE because school wasn’t as pressing to me as it is now.


#9

I want to ask a question regarding training mode and I couldn’t find a specific thread on a training mode tutorial so I hope this is the best place.
How do you set the dummy to v-reversal on block?
I have been trying to do this since the 3rd beta. I shall go through my actions to see if you can spot my flaw.

I enter training mode.
I record the dummy specific v reversal for on block actions.
I turn on the specific recording with v reversal from on block actions.
I set dummy to block.
I cause the dummy to block.

I shall go on to describe what I see. The dummy does not v reversal. white lines appear on his side of the screen to indicate that there is an input, no inputs appear (I have show inputs on). If I really mash during the recording, then the dummy wobbles a bit.

If this is not the right place to post then please lead me to the right place. I have tried multiple PS4’s.


#10

It’s actually kinda depressing to hear about how much some players train - and then many of them STILL aren’t really considered “top” contenders.

Makes me wanna run away. :smiley:


#11

don’t look so hard for reasons you could never be good

there are a lot of top players and even more very high-level players who don’t play an extreme amount

it’s less about how much you practice and more practicing efficiently. knowing what to look for is a huge advantage, so find yourself a “coach” and get to work.

even if it feels good to blame lack of time, you don’t need to throw your life away to be good, even amazing at fighting games.

…that said it really helps to be in a major city


#12

Bro you really should start your own thread… not cool to try and hijack someone elses thread with your question.


#13

I only know, in real life, 1 sponsored pro who makes his living at fighting games, and he plays 6-8 hours a day. You can always find a way to squeeze extra time out of your day if this is important to you. reducing TV time, getting a job closer to your home, a big time waster is sleep. unless you are an athlete in a physically demanding sport you don’t need more than 4 hours of sleep. even if you reduce to just 6 hours of sleep that is 2 extra hpors u cantrain.


#14

Way to set people up to have health issues down the line due to lack of sleep.


#15

health is for losers. Winners stay awake. Seriously tho, as long as you recognize that a sleep cycle lasts about 90 minutes as long as you are getting 3 solid sleep cycles (4 1/2 hrs) you will have no adverse health affects. Too much sleep does cause health issues as well, so better to do as successful people do and stay awake
http://www.businessinsider.com/successful-ceo-sleep-schedules-2013-10?op=1
http://www.businessinsider.com/sleep-patterns-of-the-worlds-most-successful-people-2015-2?r=UK&IR=T
https://www.quora.com/Sleep-How-do-CEOs-who-sleep-for-only-4-5-hours-daily-manage-to-function-and-run-multi-million-dollar-companies-for-years


#16

Medical experts recommend 7+ hours of sleep a night for adults. Sleep deprivation has been conclusively linked to many long- and short-term health problems.

The articles you cite don’t really support your point, and even mention the dangers of sleep deprivation. At most they cherry pick a few misleading examples. George Burns smoked cigars like a fiend and lived to be 100. That doesn’t mean smoking is healthy.

If you only need 4 hours of sleep a night, more power to you. But for 95% of people, it’s totally wrong that getting more than 4 hours is a “time waster”.


#17

You need to take a break from training sometimes because sleep deprivation will slow your reaction time. I used to think that it’s a big time waster but it’s not.