How to balance work life and FGs?


#1

Hey I was wondering whatthe best methods are in regards to training in FGs and working a 40+ hr work week. I cant seem to find enough time to practice…what can I do to utilize what little time I have?


#2

Any way you want. Though depending on what you do results may vary. Regardless as long as you don’t turn into some sort of faj with a knack for pissing off random people it shouldn’t matter.


#3

I work 40+ hours, and have a 1-hour commute each way, 5 days a week. There’s a get-together I attend every other Friday, and I get in an hour or so set with a good player two or three times a week after dinner.

Another important thing to remember: If you have a fulltime job, you’re probably not going pro. You will DEFINITELY need to learn to accept losing.


#4

I work 40 hours, have a gf and jam with bands on a regular basis and still find time to practice fgs. I have tons of time, even, but I spend most of it playing guitar because AE sucks… how does working 40 hours keep you from playing fgs? I used to work 70 hours a week and still had time, but then again I was working in the far north where there was nothing else to do at night too.

I have the luxury of a scene where there is gatherings literally every day of the week. if you don’t have time to train on your own, learn the old fashioned way - go to gatherings and practice all your shit in matches. I learned all of Yang’s combos (and i mean all of them) in matches, with zero training mode time and no knowledge of his frame data. That is partly because his stuff is easy, and partly because losing and having to give up your spot playing is powerful motivation to get your stuff right. you seem to adapt quicker that way.

Avoid playing online unless you are a complete noob.


#5

To be honest, once I got a real job I found myself with way less time to practice. Well, it’s not even so much about time necessarily but more about the level of frustration you’re willing to put up with when balanced by the joy of gaming you get out of it.

After I got married, the time I was willing to put into practice got even less. That has nothing to do with the wife been a hard-ass or being demanding. She’s almost entirely indifferent to me gaming. But what the necessary practice for getting better consisted of was playing better opponents and spending time playing online. In short, it consists of losing and learning from the loses. For me to level up from where I’m at now, it would take a lot of losing a LOT to superior players and grinding those skills back down to a competitive edge. That’s honestly stress that I don’t need. There’s no way I’ll play pro, nor do I need to play pro. So, essentially what I end up doing is inviting stress into my life by spending time I could otherwise be using productively.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying that gaming or practicing is a waste of time. My best friendships have come from those things. I think rather what I’m saying is commentary on how FGs don’t give me anything as a “way of life” at this point on my path. I play every Friday night with friends in the area and we game for 3-6 hours straight on a given night. But during the week? There are no FGs in my consoles. There’s no thought of “leveling up”. There’s just fun in gaming again.

It’s funny in saying that because it seems easy to read it (even to me) and say, “You don’t have the heart/skill/dedication” to go to the next step. I don’t mind that criticism honestly because I don’t see any future in that step for me.


#6

If you can’t find the time then you can’t find the time.

At the end of the day it’s still just a hobby. Unless the hobby is your reason for living then you kind of have to accept that you’ll only reach a certain level because of your prior obligations.

However, just 15 minutes a day in training mode doing your BnBs or an hour of playing per day online or off can do loads to keep you at a level that’s at least acceptable.


#7

It’s hard, really hard. When I used to play other games competitively, I’d leave at 7am, get home at 5pm, and I had to find time to eat dinner and scrim for 3-4 hours then go straight to bed.

There’s not much more time for anything else.


#8

There is no balance. Work > Fighting Games. :sad:


#9

I gave up on it. Playing fighting games (or video games in general) consistently while working a full time job takes up too much time - unless that’s your only hobby.

Depends on what stage you are in with your life and career as well. I still traveled to majors this year, but at the age of 27 I think my tenure as a ‘competitive player’ is pretty much over. Interest has been waning and FG is taking a backseat to life priorities and other interests.

As long as I post on SRK, that probably means I still somewhat care though lol.


#10
  1. Quit job
  2. Play all the fgs you want
  3. ???
  4. Profit!

#11

Does that make Wolfkrone a noob?

Training doesnt just have to come in the training room or match play. Another idea would be to get a smartphone so you can read up some guides or watch youtube vids when you get a little time spare on your lunch at work or on the train or even if you go to the toilet The good thing about 3SOE is that it shows where Capcom are heading with youtube functionality, so now you’ll be able to watch your games back any time and in any place so you can at least break down your matches and see how to improve in different matchups from that. I think Capcom realise FGs take time to get good at and this is the reason theyre adopting features like trials and youtube uploading. Obviously you dont just want to watch vids of you so go to Level Up, Team Spooky, iPlayWinner and other youtube channels like that so you can learn how to use your character from high level matches.

Execution takes practice but learning from experience and gaining knowledge can come from outside of the game and outside of home now. Its a lot easier now than it ever used to be for full time workers to maintain their level or even improve in some aspects…


#12

Thats what i did


#13

so sick of hearing this fucking example. online play - is - worthless.


#14

Well worthless in many respects, useful in very few.

Play good people on your friends list. Learn matchups. Test out setups with someone not in the same room.
Other than that, it’s low on the list of things to do if you want to get better.

OT:

Work is always more important. Even for Justin Wong. Everyone in the FG community plays as a hobby. Some are just better than others.
There is no such thing as ‘going pro’. There is only ‘self-improvement’.


#15

Why? because its the prime example that goes against your theory of online being TOTALLY useless? Marns just started training online too for Evo as have many other players at high levels. It has its benefits for learning the fundamentals of match ups etc. Sure there are somethings that work online that you wouldnt ever do in a proper match and its not as great or smooth as offline play but people like Wolfkrone coming up to the top is the prime example that proves it does help overall, especially when some people live maybe 100 miles from the nearest arcade or cant get off work to get to a tourney pretty far away.


#16

I’m pretty much resigned to the fact that I’ll always be mediocre. I certainly think it’s possible to maintain high-level play and work so long as you don’t have many other hobbies and have some decent offline competition. Neither of those conditions apply to me though so eh. All my peers who used to be into fighting games stopped years ago, they require a lot of work to fully enjoy and everyone wants instant gratification now.


#17

The problem is time isn’t always directly proportional to skill. My goodness, even with a FT job, wife and kid I get 20+ hours/week of FG gaming in. Fucking wow. Which includes sparring at the local scene vs some east coast “pro guys”. So I should be holding my own right? Yet I still get option selected/vortexed/frame trapped to death by some dudes that spend half their time playing COD. smh/wtf/lolwut…

So, what seems to matter is not how much time but the quality of time. Its not easy tho. Some people learn and commit a 1-frame link to muscle memory in a week, others months, others never. So there is a “talent” component as well.

Just don’t end up like me. There was a stretch in 2010 that I really REALLY wanted to level up and it end-up up hurting my job performance because I spent a ton of time at work trying to study MU vids. Games are supposed to be a pastime unless you trying to make a career out of it.

NINJA EDIT: So as you can see you can supplement play time with “youtube” or “stream” time, but don’t take it to far like me.


#18

I love hearing noobs say this. Always complaining about online play, because they suck. And how many online players are playing competitively and ranking? Exactly…Because you are a noob online, doesn’t make everyone a noob online.


#19

As great as lag free tournament play may be, you NEED to practice sometimes, and not everyone can just go to a tourney any time they feel.


#20

Great responses, guys! Yeah I’m not planning on going pro…I probably could have when I was in high school and college, but now after work, i just want to chill…eat…watch Reno 911 reruns…work out…and THEN train on FGs…usually only a couple of hours a night. I guess I’ve just developed an obsession with the game and I really want to get better. I usually play online cuz my buds don’t play FGs. I guess the main thing is to just play for fun and not to expect to win every match. I really liked the response of 15-30 mins a day on execution.