How to Overcome a "wall" in Improvement? (As well as other questions)


#1

Hello, this will be my first thread created on SRK.
So for a little bit of background… I started playing sf a little before 2012 was released I started lurking on this site about a month before that however. I only relatively recently created an account and started posting… Since getting into the genre then I have been playing very regularly and watching as many videos/streams as I can. I generally play AE, but I have played SFxT and MK9 a little. I play as Guile and in online I have over 1000 games played in between my 2 accounts. I generally hover at just below the 1k PP mark (if that is any designator of skill which is doubtful)
My problem is this:
I feel like recently I have hit a wall in getting better in AE. I think that I am an ok or decent player, and I know that everyone says that locals are the way to get better, and I have plans of going in the winter when I have more time/money/ability to get there.

So my questions are these:
What can I do to overcome a wall in improvement while not being able to go to locals at the moment?
Are locals really as helpful as everyone claims they are? (I will be going in the winter no matter what the answer to this question is…)
And finally, is there any thing I should know/think/do before I go to a local? I will admit I am intimidated by the idea of going. I will power through that though.

Thank you so much for any help in advance.


#2

Everyone hits this at least once at some point. I’m sure everyone has a different explanation for this, and a different way of overcoming it, but here’s my two cents. You start playing AE (or any game), and as you play, you naturally get better whether you’re consciously trying to improve your game or not. Your game knowledge increases, your execution improves, your reactions to certain situations improve, etc. The first wall you hit (or at least I hit) occurs when there is no longer much to improve upon subconsciously. Your execution is passable, you know what every character’s movelist is, and you have all the basics down. The next step is to look deeper into your game to search for improvements. Why did you take damage that round? Why did you fail to damage the opponent? When you did damage him, how did you get that damage in? Did you take advantage of all of your options? Did you do max damage combos given the opportunity? Did you play the match at the right range, or did you fail to keep the opponent where he needed to be? There are a lot of questions you have to answer to analyze your own game and find fundamental flaws, and you’ll no longer get better by autopiloting every match you’re in with no reflection on why you lost/won.

That’s just my two cents.

Oh yeah, and watch match videos and steal shit that good players do, while also thinking about why they did them. Think about the range they played the game at, what they expected or wanted the opponent to do, and why they made every decision they made.


#3

Training mode is the answer to any wall hitting. if you sit down and think about it there are things you can always work on, things like anti air (I bet you are not very good at it), frame trapping, tick throwing, option selecting, baiting, 50/50, combos, and blocking to name a few. pick on one of these and train them in the training room using the dummy record function to create situations you are weak in and then practice it.
Casually watch guile player uploads (3000+ PP) on youtube and take not of these things
[LIST=1]
[]what they do after a fireball
[
]what they use to get in
[]how they space their sonic booms
[
]and what anti airs do they use and what distance do they use them
[/LIST]
make friends with the top ten guile players in your region (any 3 in the top ten is ok) then play endless with them and ask for their advice.

Yes, locals play a giant role in dealing with your fear of losing, and the pressure of playing in front of people, it calms your nerves and allows you to think straight, although your first local will most likely be nerve wrecking (yeah happened to me too) it is a vital aspect of getting good at the game and beating the plateau and also you will get to make friends with those who are kicking your ass and then invite them to online lobby so you can train.

Yeah, pack deodorant and enough water and some food, sometimes you get thirsty due to the pressure and if you dont drink water you will feel like hell.
also try to observe how people react when they play, the calm ones are usually the dangerous ones, and try to enter their mindset if you can (dont stress it though)

overall just have fun, and if you think you have hit a wall just pick another character for fun and hit the endless lobby. :wink:


#4

Make sure you checked your local matchmaking thread on SRK, maybe there are people who live close to you. Most people who think they have to travel to find games are usually wrong in my experience on this forum. Not that traveling for games is bad.

Figure out what is holding you back, and stop it/start doing it.

For example you can get above 1K just by anti-airing and poking so you should work on those.

It’s mostly the interpersonal connections, lagless connections, and the theory fighting that are helpful.

Like others have said, make sure your hygiene is relatively good and just be friendly and open to learning. You won’t get along with everyone, but that’s okay. Find the good/successful players and hang out with them and harass them for games. You’re going to lose a lot in the next six months. That’s okay, and nobody expects you to be amazing or to improve at a ridiculous pace.

The same things that apply to being the new guy in any other social group apply. Be humble, but don’t insult yourself.

No problem.

Not necessarily, if it’s a psychological problem. If you wakeup uppercut every time but you can do Ryu’s f.hp combos 10/10 times you won’t get much out of training mode. And if the reason you’re uppercutting is because you’re scared of throw mixups, you can’t really practice defending against them in SF4 training mode. But I agree with the sentiment for the most part.