How to teach a sf noob cvs2


#1

Ideas on the things you need to teach a sf noob in order to best learn him cvs2?

Side note: After trying to teach a new player the game, I realized just how much about cvs2 I know… and how far from noob ness one has to get and how long such a thing takes. Cvs2 has a high learning curve… who knew?!


#2

Mindset, Gameplan, Control

You can sum up all of the above with one word, zoning.
Knowing the ranges and controlling space are key to any
match. That basically means you need insight as to the
ranges of, at a minimum, at least the top tier and upper mid
as well as your own character. A good handle on zoning
will leads to those handy setups that lead to those wonderful
10K combo’s you’ve been practicing for hours.


#3

Yea taking someone who doesnt know how to throw a fireball and teaching them a modern 2d fighter is virtually impossible. Which is why only old people like us still play them.


#4

That just cant be accurate. If you learned how to play, then other people can learn how. If any body taught you something about the game then other people can be taught.

So if by virtually impossible you mean, pretty easy I agree with you.


#5

Hmn… with that said, and looking at the noobs thread by bucktooth,

The first thing a new player needs to learn is the lingo.

Reason: This is a subculture; if a person wants to take part in it then they have to be able to understand the language of the subculture.


#6

teach them the basics (like how to do a fireball, what cancelling is, what a link is, etc), then tell them to read seth killian’s domination 101 articles

then toss him in an arcade, he’ll learn after being scrubbed enough times…hopefully


#7

yeah i did a norms paper on street fighter subculture lol.


#8

I’ve tried to do it a million times and I have yet to find anyone who will keep their interest that long. I wish you luck, but my experience is that getting someone past the “mash fierce and roll -> super” phase of the game is pretty damn difficult.


#9

You should see the people lining up at my last ship trying to figure out how to beat me. After a few months they finally started using light attacks lol


#10

Beat them a shitload of times and hope they ask questions or adapt at some point.

If a player doesn’t adapt, its pointless, because then you have to teach them how to adapt, which can be hard, and is just a whole other step to the learning process.


#11

haha yeah this is true; they usually give up quickly. I know I did this before; if it wasn’t for my competitive nature, i wouldn’t have learned CVS2. Maybe that would have been a good thing haha.


#12

I’d like to read that… pm me about it.


#13

i’d like to read that too.


#14

i really need to learn basics or some anti-mash patterns. I just lose a lot to scrubish things like: j.hk blocked, walk, throw; walk from faaaaar away, throw; d.lp blocked, throw; roll, super lv2; random lv3 supers (including some between pokes).


#15

d.ld/d.lk blocked, throw is something you’ll see a lot, but usually after they train you to block more with counterhits unless you’re just blocking the whole while, then they’ll go straight for throws.

watch some vids of good players they’ll get nailed from walk in throw sometimes…
how far away are you talking about here anyway?

If they roll lvl 2 super you, you’re probably being too predictable. I presume they’re rolling through some laggy move of yours right? If not and they’re doing it randomly stickout a cancellable d.MK to catch them out the roll or throw them during it, do something

Random lvl 3 supers through your pokes? Are they random pokes or your main footsies whiffs? Either you’re really predictable, prone to getting baited easily or they’re hoping to catch you while you’re mashing away, or they’re just scrubs guessing at everything.

j.HK block, walk up, throw… No advice for you here. If they’re hitting you early and you’re blocking early, might as well take the hit and throw them you’ll have the initiative. Everything else really depends on the groove and characters but I’d always go for anti-airs, safer that way.


#16

CVS2 is my first fighting game ever. I’m still very noob, but considering when i started playing it I got excited when a fireball came out, I have improved alot. From my experience the best way to get better and learn CVS2 is just experience with other people. You learn when to do things, how to do things, when you shouldnt do things, and things to avoid. Im sure at some point you have to venture out on your own and practice crazy combos and setups, but its the experience with people that really gets you going.


#17

the problem is: i’m NOT doing laggy moves, they roll at random an just super! I usually try to punish a roll with d+lk or d+lp and I eat the super

I do watch some really good videos, OTK is my favorite, but I can’t understand why nobody jumps at him!!! ppl here jump and I get owned because I dont know what to do, those jump-ins usually happens in times I’m trying to poke or when I’m not prepared. The strange thing I notice is that in videos ppl stay at a distance and poke poke poke, here I nobody do this, their guessing rushdown is owning me.

I wish I could record some of my matches for you to watch (and laugh)


#18

I’m teaching a friend hoe to play Cammy/Hibiki/Sagat in C-groove and all is going well so far, he was never a serious SF player either. He even went to Texas Shodown 6, even though he has only had a few weeks of practice and he is getting better. All he knew how to do was throw a fireball and it only came out like 50% of the time. Now he is doing C-cancels, dp’s, combos, so you see it’s very possible if the person has a true interest in the game.


#19

The active hit frames for a d.LK or a d.LP are not so forgiving as a low forward, and oftentimes don’t have the range to boot. If your character has a descent one it’ll hit “meaty” in 6 frames or less (Sagat’s is 4). Combo into a special or super on reaction once it hits, or just throw if you’re close enough. Especially if they’re doing it at a range where you’re jabs and shorts would’ve hit.

I haven’t seen one, unless he’s that guy who played N-Akuma (not too familiar with all the names) but since he’s up there in the grand scheme of things, he likely plays other people who are up there as well. If they don’t jump at him, it’s because he’s proven they can’t, or that they shouldn’t.

If they’re so keen on jumping in on you all the time out of no where, be more prepared to tiger uppercut or whatever when they leave the ground. You’ll be surprised at the results.
So far as them jumping when you’re trying to poke, that sounds like they know what your magic range is when you try to poke. You’re probably telegraphing if you’re playing good players, if they jump all the time for the hell of it then focus more on anti-airs and convince those scrubs to stop playing.

Funny enough, this is a problem for a lot of people who aren’t used to playing scrubs anymore. You gotta “reprogram” yourself to scrub busting mode so to speak. Get back to basics, since thiers is likely weaker.
And it’s not really poke, poke poke of course.
Controlling space trying to fish for counter-hits, you’ll see Sagat’s almighty d.HP for instance when he’s spaced for it. In my experience for example he seldom does it point blank, if at all.

I wouldn’t laugh; I’d be shouting like how people do when they watch football.


#20

don’t try to copy the japanese, they’re crazy =P

learn basics first, like what a poke is actually supposed to do, and how to anti air everything on reaction

I hate random roll supers, but the best way to deal with rolls is actually to throw or use your meatiest normal (lights are not meaty, at all), if you know they’re gonna roll super, let them roll in and just block and waste their meter

tick throws…took me quite a long time to get the timing to tech those…just gotta try to press throw as soon as the other guy is throwable to get the tech, or if they were doing it too slow, you’ll get the throw off instead, you’ll learn to eye the throw range with experience