I tried to draw


#1

All the fanart I see around here is incredible, so I’m scared to post these, but anyway. Recently I’ve been trying to draw:

http://www.gatotsu.co.nz/images/drawn/Remy.jpg

Remy from 3S. My first drawing that I was happy enough with to ink and scan.

http://www.gatotsu.co.nz/images/drawn/Venom.jpg

Venom from Guilty Gear. I can see that I really need to work on drawing hands.

http://www.gatotsu.co.nz/images/drawn/Ryu.jpg

I was bored and I found that cool picture of Ryu my SFAC guide. I was actually really happy with how the pants turned out on this (but his face makes me cry). May get around to inking it one day.

I’m trying to color them also, starting with Remy. But its not going very well :stuck_out_tongue:

Critiques would be nice, I would love to get better :slight_smile:


#2

I think I know this guy.


#3

I like your art a lot.

Proportions will help you improve your skills, don’t forget texture and shading.

Good job.


#4

Dennace?


#5

Yep, it’s me.

It’s cool you’re really getting into art, but if you intend to get better:

  1. Don’t be offended by critique, it’s nothing personal. Use them as a guide to make your craft better and further your ability.

  2. Aesthetically your drawings still seem a bit flat. When you are practicing how to draw, you should really start out with still lifes first. Take a simple object (like a bowl of fruits), but a light source on some angle, and attempt to draw it.

This is an EXCELLENT practice for modelling, texturing, and shading (most ESPECIALLY with the light sources and shadows). It is the right direction for learning how to draw 3 dimensional objects, or at least the illusion of 3D.

You can slowly “graduate” from a bowl of fruits, to say… a pet. Then a human. You’ll slowly realize that most entities in nature are just a combination of geometric shapes and volumes. You’ll learn how to draw a 3-dimensional object’s surface, lighting, and shadowing in no time.

  1. Wouldn’t hurt to pick up some books on drawing tips (especially how to draw humans). Some essentials include:

a) How to draw a face, and correct placement/location of eyes, noise, ears, mouth
b) How to draw appendages and torso
c) how to draw certain musclatures
d) correct proportions of body parts (For example, I think an average male is about 7-8 heads tall)

That’s all I can say for the matter. Great start, though. :slight_smile:


#6

i do not disagree of the importance of still lifes, and shading/rendering, but you can still draw people as well.
tips.

get books. a library card is free, and there’s dozens of books on form and structure.

DON’T TRACE…for that matter don’t try to emulate a style (like dragonball z). lear the body as real as possible. after you learn to draw the body correctly you can put your (or an existing) style to it.

don’t be afraid to be/get messy. your sketches are that…sketchs. don’t think of everything as a final piece you’ll do dozens…hundreds even of sketches for every final work you create.

draw every day, and the more things you draw the better all your skill will get.

draw through objects…books will tell you what i mean. remember that a house is basically a cube, not a flat square…

all these are essentials every artis pretty much uses.


#7

plenty of good crit already. Just to emphasize that reading books and all is important but nothing beats practising, so get those pencils out and keep drawing. Take critique with an open mind and try to correct your weaknesses.
keep plugging at it, and hope you get good results for your effort :slight_smile:


#8

Thanks for the advice guys.

I’ll see what I can do :slight_smile:


#9

Err, double-post. My router died while I was posting . :frowning: