Identify these buttons?


#1

Got a bunch of these red buttons recently, and am wondering if there is any info about them. They are interesting in that while they are Japanese style and fit 30mm, they have a distinct American feel, with a very noticeable click like a microswitch. The only marking is this crown logo.
Pic is next to a standard Sanwa for comparison:

http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g61/anti_flag_army/Mobile%20Uploads/20160323_144056_zpswpm6wcyq.jpg

http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g61/anti_flag_army/Mobile%20Uploads/20160323_144115_zps04afndx3.jpg


#2

I’m assuming those are crown buttons, they are a Korean company


#3

Looks almost like a clone of the low profile Seimitsu PS-15

http://i.imgur.com/bIC1fAU.jpg


#4

Definitely a Chinese imitation. Starting my search with “Seimitsu imitation” gave me results that I could work with.

JinXi Electronic Equipment

http://www.aliexpress.com/store/product/Hot-Sales-rose-Red-orange-white-black-30mm-Arcade-Button-Built-in-Micro-Switch-Perfect-Replace/1960309_32555188563.html


#5

Thanks for the info, I didnt have high hopes for them to be anything special, they were just different enough to be interesting to me. Its actually funny how I got them, my work had these disposable kiosks for holiday crap that had this built in screen that would show you a short video of each item in the kiosk, the button to select each video was these arcade style buttons, so I made sure to snatch up as many as I could before they were thrown away, I ended up with like 15+ buttons.


#6

These are just generic Chinese buttons, nothing special about them. They’re all over places like Alibaba and Aliexpress.


#7

Curious, how clicky are they compared to the IL & Happ with their microswitch?


#8

That not a fair means of comparison. Comparing Japanese to American style parts is like comparing apples to oranges.


#9

Still curious. How about, how clicky are they compared to Cherry MX Blue switches? That better for ya?


#10

Actually comparing them directly to a happ button, they have about the same actuation force, and the definite click is just like a happ.


#11

Thank You Sir! That was helpful.


#12

Even seimitsu or sanwa chinese cloned pushbuttons do not need as much gram-force to actuate than happ buttons (which have already a spring loaded inside) plus the fact that happ buttons are often sold with generic (chinese) microswitches which are generally very stiff . Add the force of the spring + that of the microswitch and it’s WAY more than any seimitsu or sanwa clone microswitch.
Even a happ button with a low force zippy will still be stiffer than a chinese clone sanwa/seimitsu button. The feel is also completely different

Secondly, Aszyd and Darksakul were right, those seimitsu clone buttons are really low-medium quality and cannot compare to happ style buttons in feel, who wouldn’t agree anyways! The brand is not “Jin Xi”, that’s just one out of hundreds of alibaba suppliers.
the brand with the crown is BLEE -Guangzhou Baoli electronic equipment- (logo is a crown on pushbuttons, but BLEE in all letters on switches). The supplier mentions it in the link.

To be honest they’re quite flimsy and often stick (material has high coeff of friction), very similar to what is found in SEGA fightsticks (seimitsu clones) amongst others. Plastic quality is barely acceptable. Some of the only chinese made buttons worth trying are the opaque 2nd gen (nylon) baolian “gold leaf” buttons (rebranded and sold by ultimarc amongst others), the short yenox are cool as well if you prefer the american style (concave plungers are flatter than happ/IL).

The BLEE seimitsu clone buttons are similar to those by Baolian (who have a similar logo that resembles a crown but really is a boat shaped sycee ( s24.postimg.org/9yyv8ucn9/rvyb101g_01.png ) unlike the three prong crown of BLEE, plus the button case has a few differences if you look under :


#13

@Agieze - I still have no idea why you are so compelled to know everything about every clone part. Not hating. Just saying.


#14

I like that there is someone out there trying out something unusual. I think a bit over zealous on the critiques, but still cool someone looks into them.


#15

Absolutely. I appreciate it. I’m certainly not going to buy all those crap parts. I’m glad someone does and shares what they learn with the class.


#16

Maybe he works for Sanwa…


#17

“Official” licensed fightsticks (tekken etc) often have clone parts despite the license , not to mention HORI (and Madcatz)and their clone parts (because that’s what they are: original parts barely re-designed), or parts found in SEGA sticks, etc.
Sometimes an arcade stick will have a genuine sanwa lever but crap clone buttons (often clone buttons are just straight shit), so it’s interesting to know where the buttons come from and what they’re worth.
Take this example: the Neogeo X hardware. 100% chinese clone parts (just licensed by SNK-P, but not anymore) and not the best quality, I extensively tested both console , sticks, dock etc, and was very upset with the quality, gladly I was not the one who purchased this shit. The day SNK-P decided to put a halt to this mascarade, perhaps they really tried it out for themselves.

Why an I compelled to know stuff about clone parts? Why don’t you ask that to the vendors who lurk on this forum , who sell tons of clone parts(PCBs, levers, buttons, accessories etc), 200 in 1 “neogeo” cartridges with 50 chinese mods of the same KOF game, etc (converters, adapters, and so on)? Not to mention the clone parts rebranded or claimed as exclusive to the store (not aiming any vendor in particular since it is common practice). They’re unanimous on the fact that’s it’s “what you need for a quick MAME cab project”. I disagree and think these clones should be better studied and compared to genuine parts, it gives ideas to modders when weak points are exposed, people may come up with better concepts to correct and or enhance certain aspects for a better a fluid gameplay (example: a nylon restrictor gate from a clone JLW used on a genuine sanwa JLW since their gates crack due either to poor choice of plastic grade, poor manufacturing, perhpas age of parts -stocks are dated now- or it could even be the transparent plastic from the JLW gates have crakced due to crazing by contact with the main body and presence of plastifiers, who knows…). I knew some arcade techs who had their repair/install shops loaded with real and clone parts, so I had the opportunity to test them there and in arcade salons. I saw some crappy clones who had a conical compression spring inside, that’s an idea not used either by sanwa or seitmisu, but the idea is valid, perhaps we’ll see this one day in genuine jap parts? Another idea coming from clone parts: upside down pivot bearings, I could go on and on. Some ideas are just shit , others borrowed (stolen) from prototypes or discontinued jap parts, and others are just well known designs used in applications very close to the mechanisms employed in joysticks (doesn;t mean they’re suited or well implemented though, clone designers opt often for the cheapest and quickest solution)

Look at what’s happening with the korean parts: modders opted for different materials ( grommets, actuators …) and new accessories (stablilizing plates, different shafts etc), some clone companies produced them locally , now the “official” companies are implementing them in their newest designs.


#18

My experience is you get what you paid for


#19

I paid 3.75 for this vegtable pizza slice… best pizza ever.