Injustice - I got beat up entire afternoon


#1

So this is my first fighting game ever … I bought the version with fight stick , I spent about 2 hour practice combos , my guy is ares …
Go online - got beat the shit out of it

What to do to be better at fighting games ?

Seems like controller feels better than fight stick ?

Thank you, please guide me to be better fighter …


#2

Learning stick often takes at least a month.

I don’t really know much about injustice, but it seems like you don’t understand the basics of 2d fighters. To begin, I recommend that you learn to zone


#3

Technically, an Arcade Stick is better for fighting games than a regular console controller, but if you’ve never played on a Stick before, it’s natural to feel that a controller is better. The thing is you just have to master the stick just like you did with the controller over the years you’ve been playing with it. The arcade stick has better accuracy and response time and allows very complicated inputs compared to the controller, but your final choice should be the one you feel most comfortable for you. The arcade stick is worth mastering though, and there are plenty of tutorials over the internet to teach you how to use it and the way to master it.

As for fighting games in general, practicing combos is just a small portion of a fighting games. There are many concepts that you need to understand an practice for a very long time before you can get to a decent level. The best way to start is to get yourself a “Strategy Guide”, you can find them as a printed book (from publishers like Futurepress) or in forums like here in SRK. follow the guide step by step learning the basics of the game first and step into more advanced features as you get better, and don’t burn steps, it’s important to know how the game works, what you’re supposed to do during the fight according to the character type you’re playing, elaborate a strategy before you make your actions, know the optimal range of you character an the reach of his attacks and also of other character. Just make sure to get solid basics before you move to more advanced stuff.
The strategy guides divide the game features into many levels, and you’re gonna spend the most time learning the basics, and you’ll be practicing a lot, going to the training mode just after you run the game should become a second nature, and playing online is just a way to confirm what you just learned new and adapt it to a real opponent. Also, playing local against AI in different levels helps.

It takes time to play fighting game properly, they are not the same as other games like beat’em all and stuff that you can learn in single day or some hours of play, 2 hours sparing are way insufficient, in fact we can say that you haven’t yet started to play fighting games. Before you practice combos, get your basics to an appropriate level, there is no point learning a very long damaging combo if you can’t pull it off outside of the training room.

I hope I didn’t discourage you from playing fighting games, all I want to say is focus on the basics, if you have good basics, the game will be easier to master, just like martial arts, if you want to throw a complicated move and you don’t have a good basics, you will fail to pull out that move.
Don’t get discouraged or lazy, don’t give up and Practice, Practice, Practice, it’s the only way to improve.

And remember to have fun playing, it’s a game and it’s meant to be fun. Having a good time playing makes you improve faster. Have a good time and a good luck Fighting :wink:


#4

Thank you so much for your tips !
I guess I will get myself a guide book first !
For now I will try to stay out of the online - it just got me more frustrated, cuz i look like idiot punching and kicking


#5

Fundamentals apply to Netherrealm games, but they’re different fundamentals. Reaction punishes, patience, and setups are all still extremely useful.

Learn combos off practical starters, like a safe blockstring.


#6

imo an online reference is better. games get patched, making static guide books obsolete. I’m sure TYM has an Injustice section.


#7

Dont pass off your opinions as facts.


#8

1 MORE question , does any1 get a hand on the fight stick ? it has the lock out button which i don’t really understand how it work and the pulse too


#9

Certain fundamentals just don’t exist outside the scope of MK. I’ve spent one day with the title, but some time trying to learn MK. It’s enough to go online and start bopping fools.

Interrupts with d.1

Identifying Frame Advantage, using your down.1 “Low Poke”, then following up immediately with a quick string. This thing is usually one of your fastest normals, and hits Mid. It’s usually your only way to stop someone from just pressuring you with strings endlessly. Low Pokes give you frame advantage on hit.

This is something I find REALLY important, probably more important than any other thing I’ve had to learn coming over from other games. If you come from VF or Soul Calibur, it makes a lot more sense.

Unconventional Anti-Airs

Some characters just don’t have a standard go-to Anti-air, like a Shoryuken (Though some do), this means “Air-to-Air” can be very important depending on what the opponent is using to jump-in with. With Killer Frost, you may not be able to AA a character with a jump-in with a huge downward hitbox. This means, you need to identify the jump-in, then immediately jump towards the enemy with a rising jumping attack. This will usually beat out an opponent aiming to hit you on the way down, since they won’t be hitting their attack button until after the peak of their jump arc.

So I may anti-air a jumping opponent with my own quick jumping attack. I generally use j.1 or j.2 with Killer Frost.

From j.2, I can land, do Slide > up.3 > up.3 > 2,2 xx Icicle Spire thingy for like, an easy 35% or so. In the corner, I can Meter Burn the Icicle and combo back.3 for an area transition, which brings it up to 45% or so. That’s dope, and may be more rewarding than Anti-airing with one-off special attacks.
**
Committing to strings even though you don’t want to**

Seriously. You cannot hit-confirm off of some of your better strings. Since you need to precisely buffer special cancels before the first active frame of the final hit of whatever string you’re cancelling, you have a limited time to hit-confirm. Your character might not have a means to comfortably hit-confirm. This is something you need to learn to deal with. Find a string that’s safe on hit or block.

If you’re character does have a hit-confirm available. Go to it!

Meter Burn forward.3

Everyone can do it. It has one hit of armor. It’s an overhead. This makes it a major defensive and offensive option against many characters. You can also dash cancel these attacks as they’re charging. This means you can use it to dash through stage hazards. Wonder Woman kicking your ass on wakeup with her fucking instant-overhead/low mixup? f.3 Meter Burn right through that shit.

Knowing what you can Meter Burn f.3 through and what you can’t will open up some serious options when dealing with predictable opponents who nurse punishable strings too much.

Know your BnBs

From your Fastest Normal
From Low
From a Quick Mid
From Overhead (f.3/Meterburn f.3)
From Air-to-Air
From each Jump-in
From Crossup if you got it

Know when Meter Burn is useful

This is different on a per-character basis, even on a per-move basis. I don’t use all that much Meter Burn for specials on Killer Frost. Her Super is ass, and Meter Burn f.3 Dash Cancels are mad necessary to deal with Power Characters using Stage Hazards (Shit is OP at the moment). f.3 also leads to crazy damage with Killer Frost, since it combos into shit.


Skullgirls OTT! -Random select is top tier
#10

How do you meterburn dash cancel a f.3? Like, what’s the proper input/timing?


#11

f.3+MB > Don’t release 3 > Dash Forward or Backwards


#12

F.3 Is forward 3 right? 3 being Hard attack button?


#13

That is correct.


#14

Yeah I figured it out, but thank you.