Is this gamestop controller common ground?


#1

I searched a bit and I can’t seem to find any details confirming the internals of this pad. I checked http://slagcoin.com/joystick/pcb_wiring.html#PCB_DIAGRAMS and cant find one that have the same shape or start/back positioning. I have use Gamestop controllers before… but these were the sharp 4716 version listed on that site.


#2

Could you post a straight on picture of it? I don’t think I’ve seen that one before. Does it have a Mad Catz marking on the back?


#3

I recall somebody post a thread on this a while back. I think it might be a rebranded Pelican.

If I am recalling correctly, it is not common ground all the way through, but you will need a second opinion.

Edit:

Read this post This might be the same pad:
http://forums.shoryuken.com/showthread.php?t=178342


#4

Looks like the one my friend just picked up from gamestop, the bb070
http://www.joystickvault.com/showphoto.php?photo=451&cat=507

And on that note, its very very weird. From what Ive gathered so far I put in this thread
http://forums.shoryuken.com/showthread.php?p=6538958

Down, Right, LB, A, Y - Can use Downs ground for all
Start, Guide - Can use either Start or Guides ground
Up, Left - Can use either Up or Lefts ground
X, B, RB, Back - Can use X ground for all

And the whackiest part of all, apparently X/A use same signal and Y/B use same signal.
I have Y and B working right now and not a single thing soldered to them…


#5

That’s not really all that wacky, using the same signal. I mean, that’s how it’s designed. Rather than a common ground and separate signals for each button, there’s a signal matrix, with each combination of high and low creating a new button. It means fewer connections in the controller and a more involved decoder.

For a quick example, if you had six buttons (let’s call them A-F), then for a common ground setup, you would obviously need six signal wires and a ground wire. But for a matrix, you would only need four wires (let’s call them 1-4)

x 1 2 3 4
1 x A B C
2 A x D E
3 B D x F
4 C E F x

So, you see, if points 1, 2, 3, and 4 are at different voltages, then the difference between each is a button press.

So here, you could say that buttons A, B, and C all have the same “ground” because point “1” is common for all those buttons. In the same right, buttons C, E, and F all use the same “signal” because point “4” is common.

I hope that made some sense and cleared up some confusion as to why non-CG pads have multiple commons.