Just one quick question!


#1

Hey guys. Long time casual SF player looking to get better after a renewed interest in SF4 and the super and arcade addons.

I bought this the other day -http://xbox.about.com/od/xboxaccessories/fr/horiex2stickrev.htm
The reviews seemed good and I’m getting on okay with it.

And then after some searching I saw that you can easily and cheaply buy arcade quality components in the name of Sanwa joysticks.

These are considered to be the best, right? And am I right in thinking that this is it? http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/SANWA-JOYSTICK-JLW-UM-8-BLACK-BAT-TOP-HANDLE-JLWUM8-/390132659302?pt=UK_Video_Games_Coin_Operated_MJ&hash=item5ad5b7f466#ht_1709wt_1396

I have a couple of further questions.

Will the eBay item fit my Hori EX2 fightstick?

What is generally considered the better shape? The ball or the bat top handle type?
And

Is it easy to install? I read that it’s a ‘pop out and pop in’ job, but some other guide involved soldering, and that’s above my station (mainly as I have no soldering iron).

Is it really needed to get the buttons as the buttons seem fine on mine. They don’t stick and are responsive.

Thanks guys, any knowledge or information passed on is greatly appreciated. :slight_smile:


#2

You will be modding a lot to fit the Sanwa parts in.
There is soldering involved, yes.

I think you are confuse with other HORI that are pop in pop out.


#3

What are your thoughts of the stock Hori stick? Decent enough for Intermediate to Advanced player? I guess expert would be a no.


#4

I respect your interest in purchasing an arcade stick, but it sounds like you rushed in buying one.

First of all, a Hori EX2 isn’t the best for modding. It’s portable and has a 6-button configuration which a lot of users enjoy. However, the stock buttons are soldered directly onto the controller PCB. There are also metal tabs on the button holes that need to be grinded before you can insert a Sanwa button. Hori buttons are not as good as Sanwa’s because they feel mushy to press and aren’t as sensitive. If you ever have the chance to try a Sanwa button, please do.

Bad news, the JLW wont fit in the EX2 either. Nor is the JLW what most people use for their sticks. That would be the Sanwa JLF. It also won’t drop in an EX2 without some work.

What you probably should of done (besides more research :p) was get the a Madcatz Brawl Stick. It’s a bit more expensive yes, but the stock parts are closer to Sanwa than the EX2 is. This stick requires NO soldering to mod and Sanwa buttons/joystick will be the ‘pop out and pop in’ sort of job you were hoping for.

Hope that helps, try browsing the tech talk forums before you jump onto some other deal lol.


#5

Yeah, ex2 is not an easy stick to mod, comparatively speaking. You have to de solder the buttons from the PCB before you can pop them out, then solder the new buttons on to the board in some form too.

Compare that with a Madcatz TE and Hori HRAP, where you unplug the quick disconnects and pop the buttons out.

For the cost of the stick, I’d say it’d be better to leave the ex2 in its current state, and invest the money you would have spent on the buttons and stick in to a box that will give you more scope for modding in the future.


#6

Also - I know why I moved away from the ex2, but if you are getting on okay with it, have you asked yourself why you want to change the stick? It might help you to figure out your next move better :slight_smile:


#7

You must’ve read up on the wrong stick, because the Hori EX2 is anything but pop in pop out.

The buttons on the EX2 are soldered directly to the PCB. So you must desolder the buttons just to get them off the PCB. I believe you will also have to dremel off the tabs that hold the buttons in place.

The Sanwa JLW will not fit in the EX2 as is - no stick will. You will need a dremel to modify the JLW so it can be mounted in the EX2.
Personally, I think the EX2’s stock stick is fine as long as you’re not using it to play Tekken.
What some people will do is transplant the shaft from a Sanwa JLF into the EX2’s stock stick and replace the stock microswitches with Cherry microswitches to avoid this modding process - the end result is supposedly better.

There is no better shape for tops, they don’t really have a significant impact on the stick’s performance, they only affect how you grip it. A majority of players play on balltop mostly because everyone else is playing on balltop.


#8

yes you can mod it, but its not easy if you’ve never done this before.

http://pineconeattack.com/2008/12/07/how-to-mod-the-hori-fighting-stick-ex2-with-authentic-arcade-parts-xbox-360-version/


#9

Thanks for the information. In fact i went into Game (UK game store, like EB) and saw it for 25 quid and done a quick Google, read about 4 good reviews from reputable sites and snapped it up. My intention wasn’t modding until I started coming here.

You guys think it’s adequate for higher level stuff? I doubt I’ll be like Daigo or anything, just intermediate maybe advanced stuff. Is it capable of doing pretty much everything or will I struggle to do shit super duper fast?

My friend is saying you don’t need all of it, you can just replace the micro switches, negating the need to mod as much. Is that true? Or would that mean you wont have all the benefits of the Sanwa part?


#10

Sorry, this got moved and I think that it slipped down the forum. Anyone able to clarify? Thanks :slight_smile:


#11

Well, it’s a cheap stick, and I’m sure you’ll get used to playing on a stick using it, but once you play on quality parts, you’ll never want to play on the Hori stuff again. They don’t automatically make you a better player, but the feel on real arcade parts is a huge step up. Most people like the sensitivity of the Sanwa buttons, and how you can lightly tap them for advanced techniques, such as pianoing.

I think changing the Microswitches out would be harder than just changing the entire button.


#12

The buttons on the ex2 felt squishy to me. I had one go on my mate’s Madcatz TE and realised what I was missing. Arcade parts are not going to make you instantly a better player - but a stick can feel better for you. Daigo could still fight well on an ex2, so you aren’t missing out.
The ex2 for 25 quid is fine - but unless you really want a challenge, don’t bother trying this as your first mod. To replace the switches inside you STILL have to desolder the PCB. The only part you won’t have to do is dremel the holes wider to fit the arcade buttons that are just bigger.

Long and the short: it will not save you money to mod this, because, in my experience, modding rarely works out cheaper.

Obviously, if you still want the challenge, go ahead! Tech talk is all for modding! :smiley:


#13

Depending on how good I get, I guess I’ll look into this more. When i get into something I normally like to have the best or nearly best of stuff. I built my PC, it’s got 2 x GTX 570s, i have a Yamaha R6, Les Pauls… You see where I’m going.

I’ll probably end up either buying the TE stick, or making one myself. But for now, I think you’re right, I should stick with this until I need to move on.

Thanks guys. All very friendly and informative posts for a newbie :smiley:


#14

It’s good stick for a beginner, later you can mod it to full sanwa/seimitsu mode which will be better then TE stick :slight_smile:


#15

I used an EX2 playing Hyper Fighting, you can change the stick to an octagonal gate pretty easily, i remember really helping with the performance…All these quality Sanwa parts stuff are overrated…


#16

First off, there should be no need to change the stick if it is functioning well, as the fighting stick EX2 already has quality Sanwa Omron switches stock on it. So the KO Hori stick is good enough, and one can unscrew the ball top and replace it with something like a spiffy bubble top or bat top, if he so desires.

Secondly, the buttons are soldered to the PCB, and will require basic knowledge on how to unsolder a connection & resolder. Simple stuff imo(especially since the buttons are soldered to the PCB, you have a nice bit of room to work with as the connection points are spread out nicely).

Also the knock-off sanwa buttons that hori uses, can hold official sanwa omron switches. Just remove the buttons, pop out the stock switch, put in an omron, and you’re ready to go. This is good as you won’t have to bother with dremeling down the button tabs to hold real sanwa’s if you don’t want too.

Looked into this a lot a while back when a friend was thinking about modding his EX2. Overall, its an easy mod that just requires changing of the switches to bring it up to spec :slight_smile:

Edit: Personally though, while the EX2 is a neat little stick after modding, i’d recommend grabbing something like a SFIV SE stick instead. A lot easier to mod and can be found cheap also.


#17

Nope. Not that easy.


#18

Not really. On the What stick to buy guide, I gave the Hori EX 2 fight stick a mod difficulty rating of 3 or moderately difficultly while the SE and TE has a difficulty of 1 (Easy).

In my mind the Hori EX 2 is a little crap stick design to separate fools from their money. The case is well made, but the buttons are terrible and the PCB does have reliability issues. If anything (other than the hallow case) maybe the joystick is worthy of redemption. It also was not on any of the choices for recommendations.

Remember people Hori EX Fight Stick series are not to be confused with the Hori Real Arcade Pro (HRAP) series.

@Phil_SSFIV
Honestly for a first time modder go with a SE or TE.


#19

Are you for real about reliability comparing Hori vs Madcatz pcbs? Madcatz has been notorious for shit quality & they still had a lot of PCB issues, especially buttons not registering or dying out…

I own the Virtua Fighter stick which is the same with the EX2…Never had any problems with it at all, only thing was that it was too light & bit small casing…Other then that the stick is fine…


#20

My friend owns HORI EX stick too, he changed the buttons and gate, I dont know if it was difficult or not, but still it was cheaper (in our country) than buying TE+ new pushbuttons and gate.