Leaf switch buttons or micro switches buttons for sensitivity


#1

just a question to people who’ve used both types of buttons.

i know micro’s require less maintenance in the long run but when it comes to button sensitivity/quick engaging can you notice the dufference with leaf switches?


#2

The nice thing about the leaf’s is you can adjust them to “hair-trigger” sensitivity… but you do have to adjust them occasionally…

Chad
http://www.lizardlick.com


#3

i’ve noticed that leaf button stick out more so than micro buttons. will this effect the reaction speed of button before it hits the switch?


#4

I’ve used both and leaf switch buttons are not as good in the long run for couple of reasons.

The main problems with leaf switches are that they are not durable and not consistent

So even if you adjust all the buttons to a certain sensitivity, they will soon unadjust themselves with some use due to the nature of leaf switches. The inconsistency problem becomes more apparent when you have to press multiple buttons at the same time. So you eventually have to constantly adjust the switches to make them playable.

Microswitch-based buttons are good as long as the button design itself and the microswitches themselves aren’t faulty, and it’s guaranteed to stay like that for a long time.


#5

how easy is it to replace micro’s with leafs (rewiring)?

i have a hard time pulling off combo’s with micro’s for two reason, i have pretty fast fingers and i dont put a lot of pressure when i press buttons, even when i do most combo’s come out inconsistently.


#6

how about using rubber bands to stop the switches from coming apart?


#7

The question you should be asking yourself is: “Why do you want to use leaf switches when microswitches are so much more accurate and reliable?”


#8

accurate? i dont think so.


#9

Buttons are not “accurate.” They either do complete the circuit when you hit them or don’t complete it. Leaf switches have problems completing it after basic usage. Their hitting percentage is less so you can say they are less “accurate.” Some are more sensitive than others but accuracy is not applicable to digital arcade buttons. Leaf switches can be more sensitive than micros but you will have to constantly adjust them. Imagine if you are playing Marvel/ST/etc. and your buttons crap out on you. You will have to adjust them like every other game. If I were directing a tournament and you pulled that shit, I would either forfeit you or make you play with microswitches. Besides, Sanwa buttons are more sensitive than leaf switches 99.9% of the time. Leaf switches are simply inferior to microswitches. If you want them, go for it. But if you have to take 5 minutes to adjust them after every game, delaying the tournament, then you will be forfeited, reprimanded, or physically harmed.


#10

like i said earlier how about using rubber bands to stop the switches from coming apart?


#11

They won’t come apart. The metal tabs that touch together to complete the circuit will bend and you will have to open up the stick and bend them back into place.


#12

i didnt say they were accurate. you did.

leaf switches work fine in the long run as long as you dont mash the button, and its not like the bend instantly, it does take some time.


#13

Yes, but the slight difference in bends between buttons may throw your timing off.


#14

Leafs are mushy and give no feedback. Granted, Sanwas are completely smooth, give no feedback but I do know when i’m anywhere near a sanwa button it’s going to go off.

There’s a reason why wico went out of business and not even happ’s stocking leafs.