Learning a Game


#1

I recently got into GGPO and am amazed by how awesome it is. However, 90% of the games I am unfamiliar with or didn’t pay any attention to when it was hot. I want to practice, but it’s not like console released games where there is a practice room. Even the concept of a practice room if fairly new.

Back in the day, how did people get so good at these games by playing only at the arcade??? It seems so much more difficult to do it that way.

/rant


#2

People wasted alot of money…


#3

Its only a waste if they lost their skills and didn’t gain anything from it… but yeah a lot of money was spent.


#4

Dedication, time, competition and money.

Yeah, that’s about the gist of it.


#5

I gotta say, even tho I played some back in those days, I can’t imagine getting good like that. I used to play Guile in WW, and I never learned any combos, it was just hold down back and then sonic booms and flash kicks all day. I really can’t imagine getting that good without a training mode to back me up.


#6

play basics, then you apply engine knowledge to that as you learn about the game.


#7

I think it would really help having someone of a similar skill level to play with, I find that if someone outclasses you by a huge margin then you probbaly won’t learn as much as when you are on the brink of victory/defeat most of the time.

If you had an arcade where everyone was around the same level, or at least had a group you knew that were around that it would probably be faster, but also fun to learn the game.


#8

FBA and MAME cheats are an okay training mode.


#9

I would trade a training mode on the level of VF4 for readily available offline competition anyday.


#10

Lots of quarters, lots of time and lots of friends with lots of quarters and lots of time.


#11

I remember paying attention more closely in the arcade, knowing that I only had a short time there to learn something new.


#12

yeah. I learned SF4 entirely on arcade, and still don’t have the console version. It’s not really that hard at all, you just are forced to make more out of your time.


#13

Can you play training or singleplayer on the arcade machine? If so, do you just insert a coin and train as long as you want? If so, then I could see how people afford to stay in the hall and train every day…otherwise, wouldn’t you need to be LOADED with coins?

I mean, in every established arcade there are those who practically live in there, just going out for food and drinks now and then. How can they afford it? And then there’s those legendary guys who just comes out of the shades, beat the shit out of everyone, and leaves in silence.


#14

SF4 had a mode (which is disable on most setups) where it let you play a certain amount of computer opponents before playing a real opponent. Obviously this isn’t on most arcade fighters.

Getting in personal time against the computer is good combo practice. It’s hard to imagine not having training mode, but you get used to it, and make more out of your time, and I think that practice ends up being more practical in the end although I’m still not able to do some of the 1 frame links in 4. If the cab is always packed, it’s pretty likely there is another less trafficked machine somewhere nearby where you could get this time in. That’s how I do it.


#15

I have been wanting to get into fighting games for… months now. And its not like I don’t have the resources to. Heck, I think I’m kind of lucky here to get into fighters. Not only do I have all the PC stuff (with an arcade stick) but I have no other then CTF 40 ft from my usual hang out. And almost all the games that aren’t like a couple years old are only a quarter so really, what do I have to lose?

I just don’t know, I have yet to start. All I do is watch matches (both on the computer and in the arcade). Maybe I’m just overwhelmed or something. There are just so many games to learn. However how many of them are played competitively? And even then, those games are a bit too much… or maybe I’m just a pussy.


#16

It’s easy to get information overload and get discouraged if you spent hours watching youtube vids of pro fights or hang out at tournys just watching.

I’ve had that with SF4, where I didn’t play it for more than a month. I just got discouraged watching how great some of these players were, and how I couldn’t get anywhere near that skill level. Of course it’s because they’ve practiced for years on other street fighters, while I haven’t.


#17

I remember once a friend “training” at the arcade by putting quarters in the second player slot. He’d get mad when someone wanted to play him… Back in the day.


#18

Man I used to do that stuff.

When I really wanted to practice I’d just play on an emulator, look up vids and work on my execution. Nowadays I don’t have enough time nor do I play anyone really good ('cept the rare online player), so I just scrub it up and learn what I can from each match.


#19

Playing at an arcade is intimidating for many it seems. I don’t think this is rare.

First I’d recommend finding the game you want to focus on. If you aren’t good at any fighters yet, I wouldn’t advise trying to learn many at the same time. It’s easier to learn one well, because the rest will be easier to learn afterward. From then on, jump right in and play as much as possible. You learn much faster in an arcade environment, and to my understand, CTF comp is high level, so you have a great opportunity. Respect is earned in arcades, which is also intimidating, but if you show you are determined to learn and get better, you’ll find your arcade peers to be the best resources for improving.


#20

You don’t learn if you don’t ask questions. I find that having a place where people are way better than me to be the best sort of setting to improve my skills in a game that I’m trying to learn. I took a lot of losses before I’d finally squeak in a win, and now it’s not so rare to see me win at SFIV or any game. I say find an arcade where people are way better than you. You’ll level up quickly because you don’t want to get scrubbed out every time. Just stay patient. Learn as much as you can. Ask questions. Hell, befriend a player or two. Talk about your matches after you guys leave the arcade/ gaming spot.